Posts Tagged ‘Tabitha Barr’

The Women’s Corner: The “Fat tax” shames plus-size women, and it needs to stop

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Since becoming an “adult” I am now in charge of my own spending. I am now more aware of what things cost – why do things cost so much? – and how often I need to buy them.

Now, shopping for clothes is something I have a love-hate relationship with. I have to be in the mood and looking cute to actually find clothes I like. And I have noticed something that at first confused me, then just angered me.

Being a plus-size girl, I have to buy plus-size clothes. I mainly shop at local retailers, but I also shop around in Wichita too.

But as I go around looking for clothes I like, I find that the sizes that I need are more expensive than those who are meant for someone skinnier.

Why is it that I have to pay more for the exact same thing? Am I being punished for being plus sized?

Women’s clothing already fits smaller and sucks into the body because, for some awful reason, people thought this was a good idea.

But now you’re telling me that I have to pay more for something that should already be sized better in the first place?

I did some research over this, and the biggest contender to my argument is that plus-size clothes have more fabric and that is why they cost more.

This is just a claim full of BS. If this was a valid argument, then size-fours would cost less than size-sixes because a six is “more fabric”.

Unless we start basing cost off of a scale on size, plus-size clothing should not cost more than normal sizes.

It is just another trick that companies pull to get more money from shaming people in society.

I feel like trash when I know that because of my body, I am having to spend more money to cover it.

Even The New York Times did a story over the “fat tax”, and it’s incredibly upsetting. The article talks about how the “fat tax” is basically punishing people for being bigger than those around them and that “it’s cruel and unfair to single out one body type.”

Stores’ higher prices for these clothes are putting those who wear them down into the dirt. It feels like a slight nudge you might get from your family at a get together like “Oh, is that your third slice?”

Because why should it matter Aunt Carol? It is my body and it’s none of your business.

The fashion stores are becoming more condescending by each passing day and it’s sickening.

At the end of the day, companies that hike up the price for plus-size clothing are really just shaming their customers who are “bigger”.

I find it absolutely ridiculous that I have to pay more for clothing because I don’t have the definition of a “normal” sized body.

I find it frustrating and repulsive that companies around the world are stooping to an all-time low.

If they are trying to target plus-sized women, shouldn’t they accommodate to their needs instead of taking advantage of them?

I am not an object. I am a human.

Do not try to shame me for being bigger than what society can handle.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communications and Production

‘Home Improvement” needed a remodel

Thursday, November 15th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Have you ever been to someone’s home and they only have the basic 30 channels? This becomes boring because you can either watch old shows or sit there and twiddle your thumbs. I just so happened to be in that situation and I tuned into the TV instead of being bored out of my mind. I flip through channel after channel but settle on “Home Improvement”.

My family used to watch that show all the time. I just remember it being one of those TV shows that made people laugh. But after rewatching it with an adult brain, I realized “Home Improvement” is actually extremely sexist.

Now don’t get me wrong, I love me some Tim Allen. He’s very funny and voices a beloved Disney character. However, that show is the voice of every manly man’s ego. If you’re not familiar with the show, it pretty much follows the life of Tim and his family. Tim is the stereotypical American male in that he’s very passionate about his tools, his handy work, and especially his ego. He is very adamant about showing off his manhood and taking care of everything a man should.

Every episode, and I mean every single one, Tim is doing things that belittle women, especially his wife. According to Complex Media, the first episode has Tim mocking his wife for wanting them to go the opera, dismisses her attempts to help him build a birdhouse, and claims that women shouldn’t be working on cars because men don’t work on washing machines.

What kind of humor is this?

You can definitely tell that the target audience for this show was middle aged white men who like to show that they are truly men. It’s actually atrocious and disgusting.

Each episode’s plot line is like a plea from every man saying, “I’m a man, you better believe it.” The male characters have to have a tool in their hand at least once a day and they have to make some comment about how they do man’s work while their wives are off taking care of the house and children.

This is not the olden days. This was only written in the 90’s. Women were oppressed in TV shows even just years ago. And of course, it’s still happening, but due to female activists, these kinds of shows are being put to a stop.

It’s insane to think that the humor of degrading women and putting men on a pedestal was seen as normal. And to think that I kind of grew up on that show disgusts me. But thanks to the changing world where women are charging towards equality, I know that this show is not worth my time, nor my laughs.

And to those who say it’s just comedy and that I just don’t understand the humor, you are proving my point exactly. If the world gives that sexist humor a platform, it will become a norm and be seen as acceptable.

But it’s not. Degrading females for being women is wrong in every way and it shouldn’t be made into a joke. A man can show of their manliness by doing what makes them happy, but in that process, they don’t need to put women down.

We can all live in a world where women can do the handy work and men can do the dishes and everyone’s ego can still be intact.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communications and Production.

The Women’s Corner: The word “feminist” is not an insult

Friday, November 9th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

If you have been reading my column long enough, you can probably tell that I associate myself as a feminist.

Now, my definition of a feminist is any person who is helping women be seen as equals in society. Where all women are treated fairly, and we get the same opportunities as men. And that’s what I thought was the known definition of feminism. But there are people in this world that took that and turned it into an insult.

I went to go look up the web’s definition, and came across a very different outcome. “Urban Dictionary” is a common source for today’s generation because any person can write their own definition based on their own experiences. These opinion based definitions show the most popular ways people think. And clearly, people have taken the word feminism and turned it into a vulgar word that now resembles an insult.

The second top definition is, “a sexist, male hating individual, solely concerned with female supremacy and the denigration of all males and boys . . . a male hater of the first degree.”

This just baffles me.

But what really got my anger stirred up was a comment saying, “the simple solution to stopping a feminist is to slap them stupid, order the bitch to get back to the kitchen and make you a … damn sandwich, followed by preventing her from leaving the kitchen, just as nature intended.”

This is not the 1940s, get your own dang sandwich you pig!

Feminism is not about male bashing at all. It is about women being seen as an equal to men in every form of life. I don’t hate men. I don’t think women are better than men. I believe, like any other feminist, that men and women are equal and should be treated as such. This is not a weighted scale, it is a level playing field.

I made this column to give a platform to women, because you don’t see those often. I write because there are topics that I want to discuss from a woman’s perspective. But never do I want readers to take my words and appoint that it is hateful towards men. That is not what this is for.

All of my columns this year are written because I felt a pull toward that topic, and I wanted to share it with my fellow peers. None of which are meant to degrade men or put women higher on the scale.

I don’t want people taking from my columns that I hate men or that all of them are terrible. Because they’re not. Like everything in this world, there is good and bad in all situations.

Feminism is a word that I proudly use to describe myself. It is not an insult, nor is it an adjective that says women are better than men. We are equals, and that’s what we want to be seen as. Someday, we will be equals in every aspect of our lives, and I hope that I have somehow contributed to that.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communications and Production

Women’s Corner: the leg-shaving hiatus

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Now that October is here, the fall weather has set in and cooler temperatures are falling upon us.

Most people love this type of weather because it means sweaters, warm drinks and the upcoming holidays.

Those are great and all, but a perk of cooler weather is being able to wear long pants. Which means the action of shaving my legs becomes forgotten.

My legs will look like Bigfoot’s in no time, and they will most likely stay that way unless a special situation arises.

Shaving my legs is probably something I dread the most in my life. As a woman in the United States’ society, I am supposed to be cleanly shaven at all times and should never have my body hair seen by anyone.

Well I am breaking this “rule”, as some might call it, because winter is when my feminine legs turn into manly legs. Long pants sure can make a difference in a person’s life.

Now, many guys might think this is disgusting, but let me tell you something darling, shaving my legs takes more effort than you think.

It is not just something that happens really quick and it’s over with.

If I am going to shave my legs, I am going to do a pristine job, so that it was all worth it in the end. That means I will be shaving my legs for a good hour.

Guys, can you imagine spending two or three times a week for an hour each, shaving your legs because society tells you that it’s what needs to be done?

Because I’m here to tell you that women are as hairy as men. They just have to hide it. And it’s not fun.

Something as simple as leg hair should not be such a big deal to society.

It is one of the most natural things humans have and why should only women be shamed for having it show to the public?

I know there are a lot of models who have broken through the stigma of women and body hair.

I absolutely love this, because it shows that women are human too. That we are not just objects for others to admire, but are a living being who has a body, a brain, and even more.

So if you see a girl this fall whose leg hair is a little bit, or even a lot a bit, long, don’t judge her.

Don’t tell her that it’s gross. All women do it and it is very natural!

Just go about your day, and think of how happy she is that she didn’t have to spend an hour or more taking a razor to the hair on her legs.

Colder weather means a leg shaving hiatus and I am so down for it.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communications and Production

The Women’s Corner: The double standards of pronouns

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Since the beginning of our lives, we are accustomed to the pronouns of the adults in charge. Through school, we call our teachers by a pronoun followed by their last name. But recently, I’ve come across a double standard for this simple action. We call male adults “Mr.” but we call female adults by three different pronouns, and it doesn’t make any sense to me.

I never questioned it growing up, because it was just what you did. However, now that I’m older and I have more feministic genes in my brain, I’m kinda pissed about it.

A woman that is not married goes by “Miss”. For a woman who is married, we call them “Mrs.” But when either of those things are in place, we can also call them “Ms.” Now why in the world do females have three different pronouns, when males only have one?

Why do people need to know our relationship status? We shouldn’t be defined by our relationships with another person. We are not dependent on others to get the job done, so why should we be called by Mrs., Ms., or Miss?

Not only are we defined by our marital status, but we are judged on our age. Mrs. is based on marriage, but is also seen as mid-aged and older women. Miss is used for those who are younger. But Ms. is supposed to be used for both married and unmarried women, but we all know that most people use this term when speaking with older ladies.

Why is this a thing? Why are women put in a judgmental box and given a name of what to be defined by? It’s such a big, but sutble, double standard that needs to change.

But change is hard in a society where new ideas are shut down without a second thought. Women are still being treated unfairly with unequal pay, and everything else that is wrapped up into being a female. Do we really need to fight for something this little?

When asking a close male friend, he said it doesn’t matter. He’s never thought of it that way and it’s not that big of a deal, which it shouldn’t be, but it truly is. I have to go through my whole life being defined on whether I am single or married. Why? If a man isn’t, why should any woman be?

Women are facing so much in this day and age and this shouldn’t even be one of the things we have to fight for. It should just be common sense and gotten rid of. It will give us as women more confidence in our lives. We won’t be judged based on our marital status, nor our age. We can actually be our own person!

Let’s stand together and fight. We are independent women who don’t need any pronouns.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman in Media Communications

The Women’s Corner: Kickbutt female characters that inspire me

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

Growing up, everyone finds a person to look up to. For most up us, it’s our parents, grandparents or friends. But the physical people in our lives aren’t the only inspiration that influence our personality. There are tons of movie and TV characters of empowering women who can brave the big bad world. They have especially influenced me and my view upon how to handle myself. Here are my top three favorite movies/shows with kickbutt women that inspire me.

“Charmed”

The first is a show that I used to watch as a little girl with my mom. She would watch it in the early mornings before school and would sometimes let me watch along with her. It is a show about three sisters who find out they’re witches, and end up saving the world on multiple occasions.

Yes, it is a fictional story about witches, but they go through life’s struggles like any of us ‘normal’ humans do. I personally related more to the character Piper because she was the quieter one of the sisters, but always had an important story to tell. Piper fights so hard for a life where things don’t get in the way of her happiness, but through that journey she learns that life has many roadblocks, but if you fight like hell, you can power through.

That for me, was everything growing up because even through the trials you fight through, can be overcome with hardwork and perseverance. Piper taught me to never stop fighting, because it pays off.

Marvel

The next group of female characters that have given me the power to keep fighting are actually apart of a huge company all together.

Marvel has given life to many female characters that can definitely hold their own like Black Widow, Scarlet Witch and all of the women in Wakanda. If the word “kickbutt” was to describe anyone, these are the ladies that conquer it with a day’s work.

These women are everything I wish I could be – mentally and physically strong, decisive, quick-witted, smart and courageous. Their pasts aren’t all rainbows, but from that, they have pushed past feeling sorry for themselves and made their own path in history. I don’t have words for how amazing they are.

Whenever something has gone wrong, or tragedy has struck, I picture them and how they would handle the situation. It may sound stupid, but it works.

“The Bold Type”

My final set of characters that push me to be my best self are from the “The Bold Type”. This is a present day show that follows three best friends, and their paths through life and their jobs working at a famous magazine company.

Not only does this show have empowering women, but they have empowering careers that are soaring.

If I was to recommend a show to watch with your BFF, this is the show that can make you laugh, cry and become closer. It showcases life’s struggles for women, but gives ways for pushing through. After I watch an episode, I truly feel like I can fight anything the world throws at me. I am a huge believer that movies and TV shows impact how you act and the paths you take through life. These characters are very special to me because they have all become apart of me.

I hope that sharing my story can lead others to their inspirations of empowering women. We can all have, and be them.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communication and Production

Column: The Women’s Corner: How I stay safe on campus

Friday, September 7th, 2018

Tabitha Barr, columnist

As a first time freshman here at Hutchinson Community College, there’s a lot that I had to do to prepare. But there was one basic principle that I completely ignored and is vitally important. As a female in a new environment, I need to be more aware of my surroundings, especially in a setting that is predominately male.

Where I park on campus is a bigger deal than most people think. Most of the time, the student union parking lot is completely full. The next place people usually head to is the parking lots on Plum. Even then, the parking lots provided can be crowded to the brim. This happened to me my third day on campus and I was freaking out to say the least. At that moment the only thing on my mind was finding a parking spot and not be late to class. I ended up parking on a side street and hurriedly fast walked to my class. However, as a female, I forgot to take in my surroundings and prepare myself for the three-minute walk. On my way to class, I passed around 15 other students, most being male. In this time, I was sized up and down, cat-called, and in too close proximity for my liking. This is an important example of how women, especially on campus, need to be aware and ready to defend.

The most common and easily accessible protection that can be bought is mace. Many females on campus already own a mace pack and have it on hand at all times. These are usually stored on keychains or backpacks and are easy to get to.

Another method of protection requires nothing but what most already have on them. A simple car or house key can be the ticket to on hand protection. To have the most successful defense tool, put the key between your pointer and middle finger as close to your knuckle as possible. Have the key part sticking out away from your body and it gives you a security of defense. This is a good method to use at all times of the day no matter where you are.

Finally, the most critical way to stay safe is to watch your surroundings and always have an escape strategy. I have become so paranoid that everywhere I go I have a mental plan on what to do and where to go if something goes wrong. When walking to classes, I make sure to stay where other students and staff can clearly see me. This way if any male was to come and use their dominance against me, others are there to keep me safer. An escape plan is essential to staying safe. Always know where the most populated places are or where a locked place is that is safe to escape to. Women in this day and age are in dangerous areas everyday, but if these methods of protection are followed, we have a better chance of staying safe and protected.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communication and Production