The Women’s Corner: The “Fat tax” shames plus-size women, and it needs to stop

December 4th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Since becoming an “adult” I am now in charge of my own spending. I am now more aware of what things cost – why do things cost so much? – and how often I need to buy them.

Now, shopping for clothes is something I have a love-hate relationship with. I have to be in the mood and looking cute to actually find clothes I like. And I have noticed something that at first confused me, then just angered me.

Being a plus-size girl, I have to buy plus-size clothes. I mainly shop at local retailers, but I also shop around in Wichita too.

But as I go around looking for clothes I like, I find that the sizes that I need are more expensive than those who are meant for someone skinnier.

Why is it that I have to pay more for the exact same thing? Am I being punished for being plus sized?

Women’s clothing already fits smaller and sucks into the body because, for some awful reason, people thought this was a good idea.

But now you’re telling me that I have to pay more for something that should already be sized better in the first place?

I did some research over this, and the biggest contender to my argument is that plus-size clothes have more fabric and that is why they cost more.

This is just a claim full of BS. If this was a valid argument, then size-fours would cost less than size-sixes because a six is “more fabric”.

Unless we start basing cost off of a scale on size, plus-size clothing should not cost more than normal sizes.

It is just another trick that companies pull to get more money from shaming people in society.

I feel like trash when I know that because of my body, I am having to spend more money to cover it.

Even The New York Times did a story over the “fat tax”, and it’s incredibly upsetting. The article talks about how the “fat tax” is basically punishing people for being bigger than those around them and that “it’s cruel and unfair to single out one body type.”

Stores’ higher prices for these clothes are putting those who wear them down into the dirt. It feels like a slight nudge you might get from your family at a get together like “Oh, is that your third slice?”

Because why should it matter Aunt Carol? It is my body and it’s none of your business.

The fashion stores are becoming more condescending by each passing day and it’s sickening.

At the end of the day, companies that hike up the price for plus-size clothing are really just shaming their customers who are “bigger”.

I find it absolutely ridiculous that I have to pay more for clothing because I don’t have the definition of a “normal” sized body.

I find it frustrating and repulsive that companies around the world are stooping to an all-time low.

If they are trying to target plus-sized women, shouldn’t they accommodate to their needs instead of taking advantage of them?

I am not an object. I am a human.

Do not try to shame me for being bigger than what society can handle.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communications and Production

Athlete of the week: Tia Bradshaw, women’s basketball

November 30th, 2018

The week: Bradshaw opened up the week with a great performance in HutchCC’s 102-35 win against Lamar, Colorado. Bradshaw had 15 points, three assists and two rebounds in that game. Saturday, Bradshaw had eight points, four rebounds, three steals, three assists and zero turnovers in an 92-48 win against Hesston.

The season: Bradshaw, a Dodge City native, is averaging 6.8 points, 2.6 assists 1.6 rebounds and 1.5 stels a game for the undefeated Blue Dragons, who return to the court on Saturday against Independence at the Sports Arena.

Roebuck’s Reward

November 30th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College women’s basketball team is off to a strong start this season, going 7-0 for the first part of the season. The Blue Dragons are off to a hot start, but this would not be possible without the help of standout sophomore Dejanae Roebuck.

Roebuck, a sophomore forward from Olathe, has been the player to watch for the Blue Dragons this season. While Roebuck is having a successful season so far, the story has not always been the same for her.

Coming in as a freshman, Roebuck didn’t know what to expect. She was not the dominant player fans have seen on the court this season, but more fearful and shy as a freshman.

“As a freshman I was a little more timid,” Roebuck said. “I didn’t really know how to take charge. I think now that I know what to expect, I’m definitely more of a leader on the team.”

Roebuck improving is something the coaches have noticed. Roebuck has improved on her skill in all positions and is someone who the coaches want out on the floor.

“She has definitely come out of her shell. She was timid at times and played on her heels a lot. She was non-aggressive and has gotten stronger and has more confidence,” Blue Dragons coach John Ontjes said. “She has expanded her game to where she can play on the perimeter. She has become a very versatile player for us.”

Roebuck is one of the leaders on the team, but the position wasn’t handed to her overnight. A lot of work and dedication was put into becoming the player she is today. Roebuck worked hard during the off season, practicing and getting extra shots up when she could.

The hard work is showing up, especially in games, as Roebuck is making 55.4 percent of her shots and shooting 43.8 percent from the 3-point line.  Out of the seven games played, Roebuck has started in all of them and is averaging 17.4 points per game.

Along with putting in the extra work outside of practice, Roebuck is someone who her younger teammates look up too. Conference play is starting to gear up for the Blue Dragons and the returning players know what to expect. The freshmen look up to and follow the sophomore’s examples on and off the court.

“I think that as sophomores we know what to expect and we have to help them get a feel for how the game is played and the pace we play at,” Roebuck said. “I think they are definitely coming along pretty well.”

Sports roundup: Blue Dragon basketball still going strong

November 30th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The Hutchison Community College men’s basketball team had another win over Hesston College 103-83.

This was the Blue Dragons final non-conference game, played Saturday at the Sports Arena. They shot just over 60 percent for the game. The Blue Dragons improved to 9-0 overall.

For most of the game, Hesston stayed close to the Blue Dragons. With 13 minutes, 10 seconds remaining, Hesston’s Cal Hartley shot and made a 3-pointe, and Hesston trailied 70-58. The Blue Dragons then went on run, tightening up defensively and pounding the ball in the paint.

Hutch went 2 of 10 from the 3-point range and 23 of 30 from the free-throw line, with a total of 21 turnovers.

Women’s basketball – The No. 13 Hutchinson Community College women’s basketball had an easy win Saturday at the Sports Arena against the Hesston Larks, winning 92-48.

The Blue Dragons forced 19 first-half turnovers, scoring 27 points off of turnovers.

Hutchinson shot just over 42 percent for the nigh, including 2 of 13 from the 3-point range and 8 of 11 from the free-throw line.

The Blue Dragons also outrebounded the Larks 56-29.

This was the last non-conference game for the Blue Dragons.

Salt City Bowl – The No.13-ranked HutchCC football team will face the Navarro Bulldogs in the 10th annual Salt City Bowl on Saturday at Gowans Stadium.

This will be the Blue Dragons’ 21st bowl game appearance and Navarro’s 20th bowl appearance but first since 2013.

The Blue Dragons and Bulldogs have only meet twice before, and Navarro have won both times. The first time these teams have meet was part of the Jayhawk Conference- Texas Conference challenge. Navarro win 54-34 at Corsicana, Texas. The Bulldogs also won the second time 41-16 at Gowans Stadium in 2013.

Football awards – Hutchinson Community College freshman linebacker Monty Montgomery, from Grayson, Georgia, was named the 2018 Jayhawk Conference Defensive Player of the Year. Along with him 23 other Blue Dragons, he earned all-Jayhawk Conference football honors for 2018.

Five Blue Dragons were named first team and six were named second team followed by 11 honorable mention statuses.

Montgomery lead the way for the Blue Dragons in tackles with 79. Forty-two of those were unassisted tackles, with 15 tackles for loss, five quarterback sacks, three interceptions, two fumble recoveries, three forced fumbles and four quarterback hurries. Montgomery also had three defensive touchdowns this season.

Come for a grand Ye Olde time

November 30th, 2018

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

The Hutchinson Community College Fine Arts Department is collaborating its Theatre and Concert Chorale to present the Ye Olde Madrigal Feaste. It started Thursday, and goes through Saturday.

Everything begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Waldo Auditorium of Lockman Hall.

Deidre Ensz-Mattox, Theatre/Speech Instructor and Director of Theatre at HutchCC, shares some insight as to what the evening would have in store for those who go.

“Ye Olde Madrigal Feaste isn’t really about anything,” Ensz-Mattox said. “It’s not a plot-based play. It’s an experience. The performance is set in old England in a grand hall complete with king and queen, court jesters, lord and ladies. Audience members will be encouraged to engage with performers and participate in a medieval style Christmas celebration.”

The choir, with direction of Neal Allsup, Director of Choral Activities, will be performing ceremonial music, Christmas carols and madrigals.

The theatre members will be doing a comedic play as well as improvisational theatrics. The cast consists of fanfare trumpeters, the court jester, butler and wenches. All costumes are to be authentic reproductions of period apparel.

General admission seating, with dinner, is $20. Employee and students tickets are $10.

The meal is a four-course meal complete with wassail, salad, main course (chicken), and traditional bread pudding.

A side note for those who might not know what wassail is; a beverage of hot mulled cider, drank traditionally as an integral part of wassailing, a Medieval Christmastide English drinking ritual intended to ensure a good cider apple harvest the following year.

The event should last about 90 minutes.

 

If you go

What: Ye Olde Madrigal Feaste

Where: Waldo Auditorium, Lockman Hall

When: 7:30 p.m. today and Saturday

Tickets: $20 general admission, $20 for HutchCC employees and students. Includes a four-course dinner.

Holiday cheer at HutchCC

November 30th, 2018

My Christmas break goals for you

November 30th, 2018

Rachel Lyons, Collegian columnist

It’s hard to believe that this is the last story I’ll write for the Collegian this semester. No worries – I’m planning to return in the spring.

As we prepare to enter the abyss that is finals week, I want to look back on eight things I’ve learned in 2018. I asked on Twitter last week what one thing that made you a better person physically, mentally or spiritually in 2018 – here are my answers.

1. Reaching out to those you haven’t spoken to in a while can be a good thing.

A speaker at an event that I went to who happened to be a retired school administrator, encouraged those of us attending his session to reach out to someone we hadn’t spoken to in a year. I promise, even if it’s the most nerve-racking thing you do sometime soon, you have a chance to grow your relationship with that person. I know personally that the person I reached out to had been through a lot since we last had a real conversation, more than just ‘Hi, how are you’, but knowing that the person was receptive to helping with an English project was possibly one of the best moments of my first semester.

2. Stand tall and show that you know what you are doing.

I had an instructor who appeared to doubt my abilities this semester. This week I had my chance to show him that I really do know what I’m doing. It could be as simple as dressing professionally for a presentation. The comments on the rubric I received back made feeling incredibly stiff worth it.

3. Celebrate those around you and enjoy their presence.

You never know when you will lose someone who means the world to you. The more time you spend with them, the more you have to remember them by.

4.  Be proud of your faith, if you choose to have one.

Before I dive into this, I am in no way telling you how to believe – just that you should be proud of what you believe in. If you have a faith, take pride in having those beliefs and traditions. Some choose to not have a faith, and that is their choice. Having pride does not mean that you should hate someone else for what they believe in, just that you shouldn’t have to fear what others will think about your faith.

5.  Find your friends and hold them close.

There’s a saying that “you find out who your friends are,” and I find it to be entirely true. Find people who are have the same interests and are going to complement your personality. Some of my closest friends are a year or two younger than me in age and grade, but they have personalities that work so well with mine that they have become some of my closest friends. My best friend is almost the exact opposite of me- short, redhead, different tastes in music and clothing but we get along super well.

6. I love writing in a journalistic style.

Although I do love a good research paper, it’s refreshing to write informally every so often, or once a week. Because of this, I decided to take up writing my own blog. We’ll see how long that lasts but how bad could it really go?

7. Passion and working to a higher standard may mean that you aren’t understood.

I was blessed with some amazing opportunities in high school, but often I find that people don’t realize that I have experience in being professional and working on projects, like a professional. Although my club advisors might be a tad frustrated that I struggled to get my projects in on time. Tad might be an understatement, but I’ll take an understatement to an overstatement. My apologies to them, but I think – I hope – I’ve learned my lesson by now.

8. The power of saying “Thank You”

Never underestimate the power of not only keeping in touch with those teachers you connected with during high school, but also thanking them. They often leave work without a ‘proper’ thank you. If they truly impacted, you TELL THEM. You won’t regret it. It may also be a worth while occasion to take screenshots of their reaction (if they email you).

Hopefully, something in this list made an impact on you as a reader today. If you want to share something you learned in 2018 feel free to join the conversation by tagging me on Twitter! Have a great Winter Break, I’ll see you back here sometime in 2019! Until next semester friends.

Rachel Lyons is a Newton freshman studying Business. 

The Women’s Corner: The ‘fat tax’ shames plus-size women, and it needs to stop

November 30th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

For anyone who is unfamiliar with the term “ghosting”, it is when one person blocks another on social media, and completely shuts them out of their life without giving a reason why, or what they did wrong to deserve to get blocked in the first place.

Family and friends who end up getting blocked by someone they see as a loved one will most likely never speak to that person again, because they were perceived as toxic and unkind. Or, it could be that they are scared of dealing with the fact that the person doing the ghosting has to tell the truth and wants to protect the other person’s feelings.

Two Hutchinson Community College students, a professor, and a counselor gave some thought on why they think ghosting occurs.

Mariah Buck, a sophomore at HutchCC, said why the ghoster might act the way he or she does.

“Because they don’t want to talk to the other person, and is done with them. they got what they wanted out of them,” Buck said.

Freshman student Paje Roberts has a similar opinion on why people get ghosted.

“I think the main reason people tend to ghost others is because face-to-face communication has become a tedious and menial task to many” she said. “At some point, the entire idea of any communication whatsoever becomes too tedious. Due to their own laziness, people neglect to be considerate enough to take the time to be emotionally and personally responsible”.

HutchCC psychology instructor Brian Nuest, who holds a doctorate degree, said a person’s personality can cause them to ghost.

“However, I can imagine that one reason people ghost could be because they are passive rather than assertive,” Nuest said. “They simply want to avoid confrontation. Also, perhaps the would-be ghost feels that telling the other party the truth might actually be more hurtful to them than fading away.”

Christopher Lau, Coordinator of Advising, Career Development and Counseling at HutchCC, gives his explanation on why students tend to ghost others.
“I have very limited experience with students and/or professionals ‘ghosting’ each other in relationships,” Lau said in an email. “However, I can make assumptions about why this is done and the potential impact it might have on the person who is ghosted. First, I would assume the person ghosting is doing so because it is easier to do this than face the awkwardness that is sometimes present in difficult conversations (such as) breaking up with someone.”

Lau said the emotional damage that comes with ignoring or ghosting someone can last.

“This behavior seems to me, to be incredibly rude, disrespectful, and inappropriate. In some ways, it may be easier for a person to deal with the death of a partner than to be ghosted by one. Death is a natural end to life whereas with ghosting there is an abrupt, unnatural, unexplained end to a relationship,” Lau said.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communication and Production

Ghosting will haunt you

November 30th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Campus Editor

For anyone who is unfamiliar with the term “ghosting”, it is when one person blocks another on social media, and completely shuts them out of their life without giving a reason why, or what they did wrong to deserve to get blocked in the first place.

Family and friends who end up getting blocked by someone they see as a loved one will most likely never speak to that person again, because they were perceived as toxic and unkind. Or, it could be that they are scared of dealing with the fact that the person doing the ghosting has to tell the truth and wants to protect the other person’s feelings.

Two Hutchinson Community College students, a professor, and a counselor gave some thought on why they think ghosting occurs.

Mariah Buck, a sophomore at HutchCC, said why the ghoster might act the way he or she does.

“Because they don’t want to talk to the other person, and is done with them. they got what they wanted out of them,” Buck said.

Freshman student Paje Roberts has a similar opinion on why people get ghosted.

“I think the main reason people tend to ghost others is because face-to-face communication has become a tedious and menial task to many” she said. “At some point, the entire idea of any communication whatsoever becomes too tedious. Due to their own laziness, people neglect to be considerate enough to take the time to be emotionally and personally responsible”.

HutchCC psychology instructor Brian Nuest, who holds a doctorate degree, said a person’s personality can cause them to ghost.

“However, I can imagine that one reason people ghost could be because they are passive rather than assertive,” Nuest said. “They simply want to avoid confrontation. Also, perhaps the would-be ghost feels that telling the other party the truth might actually be more hurtful to them than fading away.”

Christopher Lau, Coordinator of Advising, Career Development and Counseling at HutchCC, gives his explanation on why students tend to ghost others.
“I have very limited experience with students and/or professionals ‘ghosting’ each other in relationships,” Lau said in an email. “However, I can make assumptions about why this is done and the potential impact it might have on the person who is ghosted. First, I would assume the person ghosting is doing so because it is easier to do this than face the awkwardness that is sometimes present in difficult conversations (such as) breaking up with someone.”

Lau said the emotional damage that comes with ignoring or ghosting someone can last.

“This behavior seems to me, to be incredibly rude, disrespectful, and inappropriate. In some ways, it may be easier for a person to deal with the death of a partner than to be ghosted by one. Death is a natural end to life whereas with ghosting there is an abrupt, unnatural, unexplained end to a relationship,” Lau said.

Coca-Cola vs. Pepsi: Battle of the brands

November 30th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor-In-Chief

For over a century, two sodas, Coca-Cola and Pepsi, have been rivals in the soft drink industry. Each brand owns several other companies and has held competitions against the other.

For instance, in 1975, there was a Pepsi Challenge which led to the New Coke, a drink that failed so bad that people weren’t buying any and the company had to return to its old recipe.

After that, commercials were made against each other, and both brands adopted new slogans every now, and then to persuade people to buy their products. A couple of taglines that have resonated with audiences were, “Have a Coke and a smile” and “Pepsi, the choice of a new generation”.

People tend to drink whatever is in their household, so growing up drinking a certain type of pop might have influence on what someone prefers to drink, or whether they like a certain brand over another.

Ask anyone if they prefer Coke or Pepsi, and they will most likely answer right away, because it is that provoking of a topic. Coke and Pepsi are soda companies that have distributed to countries world wide, so they are always in competition against one another.

Hutchinson Community College has a contract with Pepsi that gives Pepsi exclusive rights to sell its products on campus.

Those who are more inclined to drink Coke aren’t agreeable about this decision. Some may not mind either way or choose to drink water.

Luke Nachtigal, a HutchCC student, prefers Coke.

“Coke is better in my own opinion, especially as they sell the California Raspberry flavor in glass bottles at our local Dillon’s Marketplace,” Nachtigal said.

Even though he favors Coke, Nachtigal’s grandfather would strongly disagree.

“He likes to reminisce about when Pepsi only cost a nickel in the 50s,” Nachtigal said, “I have an empty glass Pepsi bottle from that era sitting as a decoration on my shelf, and I must say, it serves as cool vintage decor.”

When referring to the contract, Nachtigal had some thoughts as to why Pepsi could be beneficial for the college.

“Pepsi seems to be more popular among especially those who don’t care enough to only want the best pop from out of glass bottles,” Nachtigal said, “I have heard many people say that they think Pepsi is better than Coke as well.”

Another HutchCC student who chooses Coke over Pepsi is Danielle Nading.

“I enjoy Coke products more, I think they are higher quality and have a better taste than Pepsi,” Nading said.

When asked if she was aware of the school being Pepsi-based, Nading said, “I was not aware that it was a Pepsi school, because I just assumed that most people drank Coke nowadays.”

Nading also mentioned that she thought Pepsi to be “an older product that is outdated”.

HutchCC student Laynee Barlow, prefers Pepsi to Coke.

“I’m not a huge pop drinker and Pepsi doesn’t have much carbonation, and is sweeter tasting than other pops,” Barlow said, “I don’t like the carbonation in pop, so that’s why I prefer Pepsi.”