Scenes from ‘Our Town’

October 19th, 2018

Photos by Natalie Devena

Teacher Appreciation needs to be shared

October 19th, 2018

Rachel Lyons, Collegian columnist

I don’t know what it is about going back home for a football game, but it’s incredible how much they feel like home – even if I’m finally on the other side of the fence, or counter. I don’t know what it is, because lately I’ve found myself missing the self-induced stress of working concessions.

I miss the little moments when we hit a slow time and could spare a few minutes to laugh together. I miss being so tired after working a shift that I couldn’t see straight.

Recently, I’ve had the opportunity to attend a game and a half – and it’s the best thing I’ve done since I became an alumni of the Newton High School Business Professionals of America (BPA) chapter.

The first time I went back, I only made it in for half of the game – but I had the opportunity to surprise my friends and my advisor. The reaction is one that I’ll remember for the rest of my life.

I didn’t have the best experience at my alma mater, Goessel High School, but nothing that happened there seemed to matter when I was with BPA.

It didn’t matter how bad my day or week had been when I went to a BPA meeting or competition. I didn’t have to worry so much about making myself likable- because my fellow club members like, and still like me for who I am. I’m not perfect, but for them I don’t have to be.

I remember having a conversation with the teacher that I had for eighth-grade computer applications (he had taken a job at Newton High School starting my freshman year) before my first BPA regional competition. It means something to have teachers who are willing to maintain a relationship, even after they have you as a student.

I was given the opportunity to surprise my Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) teacher at the beginning of the school year with a t-shirt to commemorate our first trip to National Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) Conference. It felt good to know that I made her cry happy tears when she figured out what was going.

I suppose that shows how invested these teachers are in their students. No matter how much ‘trouble’ we give them. These are the kind of teachers who want to hear from students after graduation. They are the teachers who aren’t afraid to tell you that you need to work harder or put more effort into something, whether that something is a class, an assignment, or any type of relationship. These are the teachers that you write, or wish you could write a letter so that they could know that they really did have an impact on you.

This article is coming out exactly two weeks after World Teacher’s Day. I encourage you to take a moment after you read this article to email, text, Facebook message, or otherwise reconnect with a teacher you haven’t spoken to since graduation. I can almost guarantee that doing so will make their day that much better.

I chose not to name teachers mentioned in this article because I don’t need to. I know who these teachers are, and they likely do too. I don’t need names to prove that we all have at least one high school teacher that has impacted us as an individual.

The ball’s in your court now. I dare you to reach out to at least one teacher and tell them how you are doing. Even if you think you don’t know what to say. Saying something is better than saying nothing.

Rachel Lyons is a Newton freshman studying business administration

The Women’s Corner: Halloween is scary, but slut-shaming is even worse

October 19th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Halloween is one of the top rated holidays of the year in the United States. It’s a night full of excitement, scares and more. A night where anyone can dress up like anything they want, however they want.

But for women, it’s just another chance for us to get slut-shamed.

There is this tweet that I was sent recently from Collegian Social Media Editor, Emily Fehrman, that said, “‘You’re using Halloween as an excuse to dress like a slut.’ First of all, I don’t need an excuse.” When I read this, the first thing that came to my head was “EXACTLY!”

Halloween is a night where women can dress like whoever and whatever they want and they should be able to do that without judgment from others. If a girl wants to dress sexy or show a little more skin than normal, let her go for it. I love seeing girls show their confidence through Halloween costumes.

Just because a girl is dressing a certain way, does not give you the right to judge her. I grew up being taught that it’s not right to judge because it’s not my place. But now that I’m older, I realize how much the people around me judge by first look. I think judging a person is somehow ingrained in our brains no matter how hard we try to ignore it.

When it comes to the way a girl dresses, whether it be just a regular day, or the night of Halloween, I encourage you to let her live her life without slut-shaming her or her outfit. If she wants to flaunt what she has in a way that for some reason makes you “uncomfortable”, look away. But her body should not make you uncomfortable because it isn’t your concern. She is dressing how she wants to dress, and if she feels confident, that is all that should matter.

Halloween has no rules, nor should it have any. It is a holiday that promotes dressing the way you want and that should be honored and loved. So empower the women around you this Halloween and have fun knowing that you’re letting her be who she wants to be.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying media communications and production

‘Trooper Ben’ comes to HutchCC

October 19th, 2018

By Kat Collins
Staff writer

The Twitter-famous Trooper Ben came to Hutchinson Community College on Oct. 10 to talk about making a brand for individually, and how to get known on social media.

Some of things that he talked about included that social media is 95 percent fun and five percent business, and don’t use social media as a megaphone – use it as a Walkie-Talkie. In other words, use it for one-on-one interaction.

On twitter, Ben, whose real name is Ben Gardner, can be found @TrooperBenKHP. He has more than 59,000 followers. He is originally from Michigan, and when he joined the military, it brought him to Kansas.

During his time in Fort Riley, he met his wife, who was going to Kansas State University at the time. From the beginning that they were dating, she told him that “I won’t leave Kansas.”

So he left the military to be with his wife.

In 2014, Ben asked two of his fellow troopers, Tod and Gary, to join him on Twitter. At first, they were hesitant, but Ben convinced them. They soon agreed to it, and they soon became known as the “Tweeting Troopers”.

Trooper Ben says, “I use my twitter to humanize myself to others – to show that I am more than the badge I wear.”

Maybe the best thing about following Trooper Ben on Twitter? He follows back.

Write down this number: 1-800-273-8255

October 19th, 2018

Last month was “Suicide Prevention Month”, and I would like to take the time to discuss that it is OK to reach out and get help.

Many students are afraid to get help because they don’t know were to start, but we all have to start from the beginning of something, find the root of the problem, and help that student or adult get through the difficulty that they are experiencing.

The No. 10 leading cause of death in American is suicide, for people ages between 15-85, and for those born between the years 2000 and 2016 have been increasing and this is due to several things.

Whether it’s depression, family issues or financial difficulties, I want everyone who is reading to message a loved one or a friend and check on them.

We have counselors here on Hutchinson Community College campus that will keep your information private and safe, so no one will know about what you are going through unless you tell anyone else about it.

I only recommend telling a close friend, or a family member, that you are close as well and see if they can help you. Your life matters, and I am not saying this for anyone who is struggling or is wanting to hear this, but I mean it – your life matters.

All the stresses that are happening right now may not end, but it is temporary and it will take some time to get past it. I believe in you, and I know you can do it. Giving up is not the answer, and I need you to get back up and over come this.

I know it’s not easy, but I believe in you and that you can get through it.

My major is psychology, and I have to ensure that my friends are OK, and that they don’t plan on doing anything to harm themselves. If they do, then I have to let their parent know so they can get the help they need.

If they refuse, then I would have to monitor them throughout the entire night to ensure that they will be OK.

The suicide number is 1-800-273-8255 and I urge anyone who is struggling to call this or talk with a loved one.

I am very happy that you are alive and push yourself everyday.

Pablo Sanchez is a Hutchinson freshman studying psychology

Spooky Legends: (Not so) spooky stuff be happenin’

October 19th, 2018

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

This last week, I went on two spooky ghost-hunting expeditions around Hutchinson. The first one was the Hutchinson Library with my Editor in Chief, Brenna Eller. The second was Reno Valley Middle School with our Opinion Page Editor, Tabitha Barr.

I’m sure you are reading this in hopes of hearing about some wildly bizarre ghost encounter, but I regret to inform you that nothing of the sort happened. While at the library, Brenna and I got a tour of all the supposedly spooky areas where the ghost of a past librarian named Ida has been known to be seen.

About the scariest thing that happened was after I made a (particularly morbid) joke and then some strange noises erupted from around the corner. Only to find out it was, in fact, the old elevator starting up. Oh and all the paper Mache puppets they keep in the basement? That was also sketchy at best.

While the two of us were investigating in the basement where Ida was said to have spent a big portion of her time, we rounded a corner and scared the living daylights out of ourselves with a mirror. I am still convinced they used the placement of said mirror to scare anyone who dare walk by while in dim lighting.

The second spooky expedition I went on was to a middle school, I think everyone already has a negative connotation about those awful years of their life. So going into a school where it is supposedly haunted by not only one but two ghosts?? No thank you, count this girl out. But I did it for all of you readers who don’t actually know who I am, but I write to you all as if you do. So basically, I indirectly did it for you – be grateful because this was creepy, but also required me to leave the comfort of my home.

While Tabitha and I were at the school, nothing particularly peculiar happened, but both of us got weird feelings at different times. Tabitha had said on multiple occasions throughout the evening it had felt as if someone had touched her. As in put their hand on her arm to grab her attention or something along those lines. I on the other hand just kept hearing weird noises.

We both experienced weird and dramatic shifts of temperature in rooms. Like, that is not odd enough. All the bathroom doors were open, and I guess that is really irregular. Naturally, I said we should check it out because that’s what we came there to do. While investigating, we came across a stall door that was closed.

Both of us thinking that it wasn’t locked or anything, I jokingly turned to Tabitha and told her she should check inside the stall. In the moment she decided to be brave, or as brave as possible. The moment she went to nudge it open with her foot and it did not budge? I can’t describe how fast I made it out that bathroom, leaving Tabitha to deal with the findings herself.

In the end we never did find out why that one lonely stall was locked. I made up some ridiculous story to freak Tabitha out about how the ghost of the janitor or kid were in there, but in reality, I’m sure some kid thought it would be funny to lock the door from the inside and crawl out.

 

 

Spooky Legends: Theorosa’s Bridge continues to haunt

October 19th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff Writer

A concrete bridge sits just a few miles outside the small town of Valley Center. If you were to drive past it, you probably would not notice anything out of the ordinary. However, this bridge may be one of the most haunted places in Kansas.

The stories seem to vary, especially as the years go by. Every manifestation of the legend revolves around a mother and her baby. The earliest legend takes place late in the 1800s.

According to the story, Indians attacked a wagon full of settlers and stole a baby named Theorosa. The mourning mother roamed the area, calling out for her lost child until she herself died. It is said that you can still hear her calling out for Theorosa.

In a more modern version, the story is that a farm wife named Theorosa gave birth to an illegitimate child. She threw the baby into the river to drown it, then drowned herself out of guilt.

Rumors are that if you go to the bridge and announce that you have her child, she will attack you and try to throw you into the river as well.

Like most haunted location, the bridge has become somewhat of a local attraction, piquing the interest of believers and skeptics alike.

One visitor, Linda Ritter, recounted her experience on Angels and Ghosts, a paranormal blog.

Ritter and her friends said they experienced an overwhelming sense of sadness as they drove over the bridge.

“I have been to several places and had experiences, but not quite like this,” Ritter said.

After stopping, the group tried to call out for Theorosa. While at first nothing happened, one by one they started to hear the sounds of a baby crying. One girl said she felt something bump against her. They left soon after.

The next morning, the girl who said she had been bumped found a dark bruise on her body, exactly where she had felt it the night before.

Many visitors have reported similar occurrences, such as the appearance of a woman’s ghost, cold winds, unexplained vehicle problems, and the sounds of a baby crying.

The bridge, originally built out of iron and wood, burned down in 1974, only to be rebuilt and burned down again in 1976. After closing for 15 years, the bridge was again rebuilt in 1991, this time in its current concrete state.

For those interested in checking this ghostly bridge out, it is located at 109th street North and Meridian. Over the years, the bridge has been a common spot for vandalism and is now covered in graffiti.

If you decide to taunt the ghost of Theorosa, do it at your own risk, and be prepared for a haunting encounter.

Blog: http://www.angelsghosts.com/theorosas_bridge_ghost_story

Photo taken from: https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/kansas/theorosas-bridge-kansas/

 

 

Spooky Legends: The ghosts of Reno Valley Middle School

October 19th, 2018

By Tabitha Barr
Opinion Page Editor

Schools seem to haunt everyone.

It’s the place we dread to go, but have to nonetheless. However, there is one school in particular that seems to be haunted, not just by memories of teetering grades and awkward throwbacks, but by spirits from the other side. Reno Valley Middle School is located on the outskirts of Hutchinson and is a part of the USD 309 Nickerson-South Hutchinson district. There are many stories from teachers and staff that are unexplainable and creep in many ways.

Three ghosts experiences have been told, but the main ghost everyone knows is the former custodian. A source who would like to remain anonymous shares that the middle school use to have a therapy dog named Allie and “she would often stop and stare at “somebody” near the rear tech lab door. Evidently, this is where an old custodian would stand when she would watch the kids.”

This spirit is, according to legend, just a caretaker of the school who looks out for the students and staff. There is said to be only one picture known to exist with the custodian, and no physical evidence could be provided.

Two girls once took a selfie in the seventh grade girls restroom that seemed nice and innocent, but they were not expecting it to have three faces staring back. In the picture, there is a weird face that appears between two girls. That girls’ restroom has many ghostly feelings reported and they continue to pour in.

Around 10 years ago, Reno Valley even had a man come in and see if he could connect or see any paranormal activity.

To one person’s account, they “were in the office. (The guy) asked (them) to come towards the counselor office. As (they) started down the hall, the temperature dropped and the hair on (their) neck stood up. The guy said that the spirit was on (them).”

So according to a paranormal psychic, the middle school definitely has some ghostly figures among the halls.

The second ghost only a has a couple of witnesses but their stories commonly send shivers down listeners back. This one is of a little girl who yells and calls out for her mommy.

According to Trissa McCabe, an eighth-grade math teacher, “It was a Sunday afternoon and as I worked in my classroom, I heard a little girl yelling. I thought it was another teacher’s daughter. As I waited for them to pop into my room, they never did. So I went to look out the window expecting to see (a) vehicle but the parking lot was empty.” Another teacher said that they heard “Mommy?” when walking down by the gym doors. No one knows who the kid could be or who he is searching for.

The final ghost is said to be the late Steve Lehmann, who was the activities director. He passed away in 2013 but a year after he passed, most of the keys to the cabinets in the Panther Den disappeared. This was Lehmann’s main area of the school and he was always there with students. The keys were “later discovered in a cabinet the staff had been in several times, sitting in plain sight.”

To the staff, it seemed to be too coincidental and they all believed it was Lehmann showing that he was still apart of the school.

Reno Valley Middle School has many paranormal experiences that have been shared throughout the years. Ghosts are a part of the unknown, and, apparently, this middle school is a common ground for both the living and the departed

Spooky Legends: Local library lore

October 19th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor In Chief

Those who have been to the Hutchinson Public Library may not know that there is an interesting history right in front of them.

Some have noticed when Google searching, “Most haunted places in Kansas”, that the public library usually appears at the top of the list.

From library employees to patrons, many people have claimed to encounter the ghost of a librarian named Ida Miranda Day-Holzapfel, who was one of the first librarians at the Main Street location and worked all over Kansas in several different libraries. Kate Lewis, who works as Marketing and Communications at the library, researched Ida Day and found a lot of new information that most never knew, and sent it to Reno County Museum.

Lewis said that Ida Day had unfinished business at the library and believes that the high electromagnetic field in the basement explains why she seems to be most active in there.

Lewis said that Ida Day was born in Colony in 1888 and was hired at Hutchinson Public Library, then located at 5th and Main Street – now the Union Labor Temple – in 1916 at the age of 28 after being a teacher in Colony and Iola. She made $75 a month and was given a two-weeks paid vacation.

In 1917, during the library remodeling, “Ida and her assistants cataloged and classified every book, a thing which was never done before,” Lewis said, “One of the best ideas which Miss Day has inaugurated into the system of management is the perfection of the reference arrangements.”

Lewis also said that Ida helped people look up any number of books. Ida also mounted and classified 3,000 pictures during this time.

One of Miss Day’s many achievements was sending books out to soldiers during WWI in 1918.

Ida Day was library director from 1916-1925.

In 1925, Ida took a leave of absence for a year to study at the University of Kansas. In 1926, Ida resigned.

Ida was married at the age of 52 to John Holzapfel, in 1940.

In 1946, Ida returned to the library, and there had been plans for another remodel since the population doubled. They wound up building a new library, which is where it is now. Ida even wrote an article for the Library Journal in 1949, which was titled, “Hutchinson Builds Modern Library”, where she described the modernization that was taking place and even included blueprints for the new library.

Ida yet again served as Library Director of the Hutchinson Public Library from 1946-1954

Her husband died in 1948, the same year her sister, Sarah Elizabeth Mather, died.

On Feb. 1, 1954 Ida resigned from the public library and prepared herself to become head of the catalog department at the Tulare County library system in Visalia, Calif. on March 1.

“A wish to be relieved from the administrative duties prompted the change,” Holzapfel said.

She was going to keep her home in Hutchinson at 430 East 12th, which is one of the student/faculty parking lots of Hutchinson Community College.

Ida Day died from a fatal car accident in California at the age of 65.

Lewis was one who has experienced unexplainable things in the library, one of which was when she first was given a tour of the basement and got chills where she felt the hair on her head stand up.

Another experience was while taking photographs with her 7-year old daughter for a stuffed animal sleepover program.

“She doesn’t know about the library ghost,” Lewis said. “I didn’t want her to be scared of the library.”

They walked to the location where the Children’s Services supplies are, which include puppets and paper-mache sculptures in the oldest area of the building built in 1951.

“I thought my daughter would be fascinated,” Lewis said, “Instead, she instantly said that she didn’t like the room and that it felt scary.”

Lewis also said that her daughter didn’t want her to take pictures of the animals and just wanted them to get out of there.

The Hutchinson Public Library Business Manager, Tina Stropes, had a strange encounter with Ida Day about 15 years ago, in 2003. Stropes was working on payroll, adding up timesheets when her calculator started printing “0.00” repeatedly.

“We decided that it was Ida Day wanting to get paid, but she didn’t work any hours,” Stropes said.

That isn’t all that happened, because the next month of doing payroll, Stropes’ calculator did the same thing and she told Ida that she wasn’t working any hours so she wasn’t getting paid and the calculator stopped.

There were other experiences, such as visitors being poked and no one would be there, and some had feelings of being watched.

Whether a believer of ghosts or not, the Hutchinson Public Library is a historical building with an interesting past and is worth the visit to many.

Sports roundup: Football team wins at Coffeyville

October 19th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The No. 4-ranked Hutchinson Community College football team completed its best start to a season since 2014 with a dominant defensive performance Saturday night at Veterans Memorial Stadium in Coffeyville.

The Blue Dragons overcame offensive season lows in first downs and passing, to defeat Coffeyville 24-14.

The win also came without coach Rion Rhoades, who was serving a one-game suspension after being ejected the week before.

The Blue Dragons have won five consecutive games, and now sit 7-1. The Blue Dragons remain unbeaten in the Jayhawk Conference at 5-0.

Hutchinson’s defense had a season-high nine quarterback sacks and two interceptions, with one returned for a touchdown.

Monty Montgomery had four tackles and three quarterback sacks. He also intercepted a Coffeyville pass and returned it 25 yards for a touchdown.

Dezmon Jackson’s first touch of the game went for a 90-yard touchdown. Jackson’s run tied three others for the second-longest run from scrimmage in Blue-Dragon history.

Freshman quarterback Mason Schucker had a rough night, going 10 of 22 passing for a season- low 88 yards and an interception.

The Blue Dragons travel to Dodge City next Saturday with a 1 p.m. kickoff time.

Women’s cross country – The No. 6-ranked Hutchinson Community College women’s cross country team captured another win of the season with three runners placing in the top 10 at the Fort Hays State Open.

This is the Blue Dragons second team championship this season.

The Blue Dragons scored 51 points, with freshmen Lisayo Ewoi and Gabby Collins, and sophomore Sarah Patterson placing in the Top 10.

The HutchCC women’s cross country team is off for two weeks before competing in the Region 6 Championships in Winfield.

Men’s cross country – The No. 10-ranked men’s cross country team had its three-race winning streak snapped by two points. The men’s team finished second overall at Fort Hays State.

The Blue Dragons were edged out by Jayhawk Conference and Region 6 rival Colby, 55-57.

Freshman Andrew Kibet also lost his three-race winning streak, placing second to Cloud County runner, Dennis Kiptoo.

The HutchCC men’s team will compete in the Region 6 Championships on October 27.

Soccer – The Hutchinson Community College women’s soccer team had its ninth straight shutout of the season, in a 2-0 Jayhawk West victory on Saturday over Dodge City.

The Blue Dragons improve to 11-2-1 overall and 9-2-1 in Jayhawk West play.

It didn’t take long for HutchCC to get on the board when freshman Sydney Blackwell scored her seventh of the season.

Sophomore Brailey Moeder gave the Blue Dragons an insurance goal when she found the back of the net for her 10th goal of the year.

The Blue Dragons will play host to Pratt at 6 p.m. on Wednesday night for Sophomore Night at the Salthawk Sports Complex.

Volleyball – The volleyball team traveled to West Plains, Missouri, to play a series of matches at the Grizzly Invitational at the West Plains Civic Center.

Sophomore libero Raychel Reed became the fourth Dragon in program history to reach 1,000 career digs during the weekend. The Blue Dragons dropped three of the four matches, but every loss went at least four sets.