Roundup: Busters steal late win vs. Blue Dragons

November 9th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

With 18 seconds left Saturday in the biggest game in the season for Hutchinson Community College football team, jaws were dropped.

The Blue Dragons had a chance to win a Jayhawk Conference championship on its home field, Gowans Stadium, against No. 2 Garden City. But Garden City’s Charles West’s 6-yard reception with put Garden City up 24-21, leading the Busters to a victory over No. 4 Hutchinson. The Blue Dragons fell to 6-2 and 6-1 in the Jayhawk Conference.

Sophomore running back Dezmon Jackson had an outstanding performance, breaking the school record for the longest run from scrimmage with a 97-yard touchdown run, giving the Dragons a 14-7 lead early in the third quarter.

Jackson becomes the first Blue Dragon to rush for 1,000 yards since 2012 when Terrell Lane did. Jackson currently has 1,050 yards. Jackson also has had two runs for more than 90 yards, four runs better than and 80 yards and 11 runs better than 20 yards all this season.

Jackson’s 18-yard touchdown gave the Blue Dragons lead 21-17 with 9:30 left to play.

Hutchison’s Clarence Hicks then had a quarterback sack with 6:24 left to play, but Garden City had the ball with 4:11 left.

The Blue Dragons held Garden City’s nation-leading rushing offense to 150 yards.

HutchCC quarterback Mason Schucker completed 12 of 21 passes for 158 yards. Jaylen Erwin had four catches, a season high with 109 yards.

Linebacker Money Montgomery had the third most tackles by a Blue Dragon in one game with 21 tackles, with one forced fumble. Jahmard Morgan had 13 tackles and Jamykal Neal had a career-high 10 tackles.

The Blue Dragon with end their regular season at home on Saturday against Iowa Central, kickoff at noon.

Volleyball – The Hutchinson Community College volleyball team pulled off a win in the semifinals of the Region 6 Tournament in Liberal, a four-set 15-25, 25-21, 25-19, 25-20 win over Colby on Sunday at the Green House in Liberal.

In the championship match the Blue Dragons were defeated by top seed Seward County 25-19, 25-22, 25-22, ending the Blue Dragons’ season. The Saints will advance to the NJCAA Division 1 National Championship later this month in Hutchinson.

Colby dominated the first set in game one 25-15. The Blue Dragons followed with 25-21 lead, winning the last three matches.

Seward County won all three matches in game two for the Blue Dragons, finishing their season.

Women’s basketball – The No. 13-ranked Hutchinson Community College women’s basketball team opened the season by crushing its opponent, the Bethany College junior varsity, 107-32 on Thursday at the Sports Arena.

The Blue Dragons shot almost 54 percent overall and managed 26 steals.

Freshman Milan Schimmel had a 19 points,  four rebounds, two assists and two steals.  Sophomore Jada Mickens had 17 points. Sophomore Dejanae Roebuck had 14 points and four steals.

Freshman Abby Ogle had 12 points, seven rebounds, five assists and five steals. Sophomore Tia Bradshaw had nine points, four steals and three assists. Tijuana Kimbro and freshman Makayla Vannet, had eight points.

Men’s basketball –  James Rojas scored 22 points, and Fred Odihiambo added 13 points and nine rebounds as the Blue Dragons pounded Northern Oklahoma College-Enid 109-68 on Tuesday in Enid, Oklahoma.

Chris Giles addd 16 points, while DJ Mitchell scored 19 points off the bench. The Blue Dragons improved to 3-0 with the win.

 

To all who’ve asked: This is where I’m from

November 9th, 2018

Rachel Lyons, Collegian columnist

At this point in the semester, I think it’s high time I address where I’m from.

Buckle your seatbelts ladies and gentlemen. It’s important that you know some basic facts first. I have lived my entire life in Newton. My diploma and letter jacket are marked with Goessel High School and some form of blue and white.

If anything in the whole process of trying figure out what to tell people when they ask “where are you from,” I’ve learned that no matter where you claim to be at home, where you went to high school or where you make your home after college – you will have people who mean the world to you. You will have people whom you can call on when you need help with a project or when you think you might burst because you need to tell someone your good news (or bad news).

It doesn’t matter what town you graduated from, lived in all your life, or what town you went to college in. It matters who you meet and what kind of impression that you make on them. Even if you sing your school’s alma mater with someone after every sporting event, you might not know them at all or you could become their best friend.

With that said – I claim Newton as ‘where I’m from’. I may have graduated a Goessel Bluebird, and become a Hutchinson Community College Blue Dragon – but I found my friends in the town that I lived in and a few surrounding towns. Most are or were Newton Railers, one a Canton-Galva Eagle, the other a Blue Valley Ram. There are a few in my high school graduating class that I have decided are close enough to keep in touch with – but for the most part my friends are in Newton.

I think I should re-introduce myself now, and so I will. Hello, my name is Rachel Lyons. I am a freshman business major here at HutchCC. I am from Newton and graduated in May 2018 from Goessel High School. In high school, I was a very active member of Family, Career, and Community Leaders (FCCLA) and Business Professionals of America (BPA). Hopefully that clears the confusion up.

Rachel Lyons is a Newton freshman who attended Goessel and is studying Business

Students trying to beat the mid-semester blues

November 9th, 2018

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

During this time of the year, it’s often found that not only do students’ grades start to slack but so does their mental health. Two Hutchinson Community College students – Burrton sophomore Maddie Winter and Salina freshman Slade Negus – sat down to discuss having the late semester blues.

Maddie Winter, Burrton sophomore

Emily Fehrman: Why do you think it is that around this time that students get so burned out?

Maddie Winter: It’s starting to get colder out, which makes it harder to get out of bed in the morning. A lot of times we put our school work over our self care. We start to feel overwhelmed and eventually give up. In this instance, eventually means around this time of year.

Slade Negus: I think for the students (more so freshmen) the new feeling and freshness of the off the going to a college starts to wear off so they lose motivation.

EF: Do you think it has anything to do with the holiday season?

SN: I’m almost certain the holidays have something do with it missing family or just feeling lazy.

MW: I think that students are excited for Thanksgiving break and winter break, so it makes classes seem a lot more dreadful. I mean, who would rather be in a classroom than spending time with friends and family.

EF: What helps you personally to get through this rut?

SN: Personally working or accomplishing tasks helps me get through it because once i finish something I feel better about doing more.

MW: I just tell myself that the semester is almost over and to not give up. If I made it this far, I can finish strong.

EF: Do you maybe have any tips to help other HutchCC students from falling behind on their school work this semester?

MW: Don’t save all of your homework for one day of the week, spread it out as much as possible.

SN: Focus on the big grades that matter, tests, big papers, etc.

EF: Is there anything you would do differently this semester?

MW: Study more. I always wait until a day or two before my exam to start studying.

SN: I would have studied more for college algebra it is easier to maintain than to catch up.

Retail me, RetailMeNot

November 9th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Campus Editor

If students recall, there was a review about the “Honey” app earlier this year.

“RetailMeNot” is basically like that, but this time you can download it on your computer by looking it up, or you can use your phone, as it is totally free in the Google Play Store.

The only information needed is your email, or you can use Facebook login. It will then ask you if you want to enable your location to find stores near students that will help find deals that are near you, which is highly recommend because if adults or students are using their phone they can find malls or stores that are near them.

Once you progress through the app, it will show you nine different categories, but you can only pick four. Once you selected those four it will inform you that you can save up to $20 or more. This app is better than “Honey” and the reason is because it offers more deals, and it will inform you on how to qualify for cash back when you click on whatever it is that you are wanting to spend your money on.

These deals that students see will change every month. Students then will have to go into a store and show the coupon to the cashier and it will be applied to whatever it is that you are buying. Some coupons may not work. If it doesn’t work, be sure to report it to customer service and they will have it removed within a few minutes.

This app will also inform you of free shipping and will give you a code that you can use, so be sure to pay attention to that. “RetailMeNot” will even offer discounts on hotels, plane tickets and car rentals.

Don’t be a total Boo, and get some discounts on Halloween candy or costumes. If you are looking for ways to save money, then this app is definitely for you.

New campus group looking to give a spark

November 9th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

When looking at the number of students who attended church regularly throughout their youth, many studies estimate nearly 70 percent of those students leave the church once they hit college.

This could be due to a change in ideology, a chance for rebellion, or the simple lack of time and energy.

It could also be the fact that many students are now on their own, and don’t have a connection with any of the local churches. One student at Hutchinson Community College had made it her goal to create an open environment for people to worship and discuss the Bible.

Genesis Schmutz, freshman at HutchCC, works as an intern for Spark United, a church that consists of multiple small locations rather than one big building.

“It’s a network of house churches, and I’m in charge of starting a house church here at HutchCC,” Schmutz said.

She became involved with Spark United through her friendship with the lead pastor.

“I loved the concept,” Schmutz said. “It was less structured than normal. It’s all about the church meeting the people rather than people meeting the church.”

Schmutz describes the small group that meets on campus as a church of its own. A normal service consists of worship, a bible study, and then a discussion about what the story means in everyday life.

“People bring instruments, we sing a few songs, and we talk about Jesus,” Schmutz said. “It’s very discussion oriented.”

Her main goal for the house church is to share the love of Jesus. It’s a place to make friends and ask one another hard questions.

Attendance for the church is usually a hit-or-miss.

“It’s crazy, we have a really varied amount of people,” Schmutz said. “It can be anywhere from two to 13.”

When asked what she would say to anyone considering coming, but may not be sure about it, she had a simple and sweet answer.

“Just do it. It’s a great place to build community and make friends,” Schmutz said. “It’s also cool to listen to music. Sometimes I tell people we’re ‘jammin with Jesus’.”

Services take place on Thursday nights at 7 p.m. in the basement of Parker Student Union.

The Women’s Corner: The word “feminist” is not an insult

November 9th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

If you have been reading my column long enough, you can probably tell that I associate myself as a feminist.

Now, my definition of a feminist is any person who is helping women be seen as equals in society. Where all women are treated fairly, and we get the same opportunities as men. And that’s what I thought was the known definition of feminism. But there are people in this world that took that and turned it into an insult.

I went to go look up the web’s definition, and came across a very different outcome. “Urban Dictionary” is a common source for today’s generation because any person can write their own definition based on their own experiences. These opinion based definitions show the most popular ways people think. And clearly, people have taken the word feminism and turned it into a vulgar word that now resembles an insult.

The second top definition is, “a sexist, male hating individual, solely concerned with female supremacy and the denigration of all males and boys . . . a male hater of the first degree.”

This just baffles me.

But what really got my anger stirred up was a comment saying, “the simple solution to stopping a feminist is to slap them stupid, order the bitch to get back to the kitchen and make you a … damn sandwich, followed by preventing her from leaving the kitchen, just as nature intended.”

This is not the 1940s, get your own dang sandwich you pig!

Feminism is not about male bashing at all. It is about women being seen as an equal to men in every form of life. I don’t hate men. I don’t think women are better than men. I believe, like any other feminist, that men and women are equal and should be treated as such. This is not a weighted scale, it is a level playing field.

I made this column to give a platform to women, because you don’t see those often. I write because there are topics that I want to discuss from a woman’s perspective. But never do I want readers to take my words and appoint that it is hateful towards men. That is not what this is for.

All of my columns this year are written because I felt a pull toward that topic, and I wanted to share it with my fellow peers. None of which are meant to degrade men or put women higher on the scale.

I don’t want people taking from my columns that I hate men or that all of them are terrible. Because they’re not. Like everything in this world, there is good and bad in all situations.

Feminism is a word that I proudly use to describe myself. It is not an insult, nor is it an adjective that says women are better than men. We are equals, and that’s what we want to be seen as. Someday, we will be equals in every aspect of our lives, and I hope that I have somehow contributed to that.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communications and Production

Thanksgiving is the leftovers nobody acknowledges

November 9th, 2018

There are two kinds of people out there. There are ones who start celebrating Christmas on November 1, or even earlier, and then there are those who don’t put up their lights and Christmas tree until either the month of December or right after Thanksgiving.

The only time that Thanksgiving is truly acknowledged is on the day itself. Why is that?

There are very few Thanksgiving decorations in stores. Maybe a dish towel or rags with a turkey on it or themed plates and napkins. The only songs related to Thanksgiving are from “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” or are just so unknown that they are never played. All over, there are stores playing Christmas music already.

What holiday is more underrated than Thanksgiving? Even Valentine’s Day seems to receive more credit and that makes no sense.

At least there is the traditional Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade to show some importance for the holiday. Not everyone may watch it, but most likely they turn the channel on for the background noise while making the Thanksgiving meal.

Family is a huge importance for a lot of people, and Thanksgiving is the time for everyone to come together despite differences and appreciate what you have.

There is also not as much hassle for anyone other than the person responsible for the turkey, but even then, there are other family members who step in and help. Another hassle you don’t have to worry about on Thanksgiving is giving gifts. Instead you give thanks, thus the name of the holiday.

Who doesn’t look forward to the holiday you can stuff your face and then take a nap right after with a football game on television?

If Halloween gets a whole month to itself and Christmas gets three, then why can’t Thanksgiving get more acknowledgement?

Law enforcement impersonators at large

November 9th, 2018

By Kat Collins
Staff writer

On Monday, the Hutchinson Police Department sent a press release about some people pretending to be security and police in parks around the city.

The Hutch PD said that the suspects have approached parked vehicles in city parks, identifying themselves as the security or police and asking one of the people to exit the car. Then, once the person is outside the vehicle, the victims have reported being sexually assaulted.
The City of Hutchinson does not employ any sort of Park Security. The only law enforcement that patrols the parks around the city, are commissioned law enforcement that include the HPD, Reno County Sheriff’s Office, and Kansas Highway Patrol.

If you are contacted by someone in a city park claiming to be a police officer or park security, you should lock your doors and on roll up your windows on your car. The officer should show you their official badge, name and badge number.

If you have doubt during the contact, inform the officer that you are calling 911 to verify their Identity. If the officer tries to stop you from calling 911, remain on the line with 911 and drive to the Law Enforcement Center at 210 W 1st, Hutchinson.

If the said officer you are questioning leaves the scene, call 911 and report the incident Immediately.

Giles fitting in at HutchCC

November 9th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

For sophomore basketball player Chris Giles, coming to Hutchinson Community College, or attending any junior college, was never the plan.

Giles, a Dallas native, had his college plans set after graduation from Findlay Prep in 2017: Attend the University of Oklahoma and play basketball there, just like his dad did.

That’s exactly what Giles did for the 2017-2018 basketball season, until he and his family decided that playing basketball at Oklahoma wasn’t quite the right fit for him.

“I had a great time there, but things obviously didn’t work out,” Giles said. “As a family, we decided to come here to Hutch. We felt like that would be the best situation for my future down the road.”

Coming to HutchCC has worked out so far for the sophomore guard. The coaches expect a lot out of Giles, but mostly, they just want him to be a leader on and off the court.

“Lead the team and be a coach on the floor. Obviously, he wants to score some points, but I told him I don’t care if he scores at all. Just lead the team and the points will come,” coach Steve Eck said.

This is not the first time this century a basketball player from Oklahoma has transferred to HutchCC. Bobby Maze, who played for former Blue Dragon coach Ryan Swanson during the 2006-2007 season, also transferred to HutchCC.

Maze played for the Blue Dragons for 2007-2008 season and was named the Most Valuable of the Jayhawk Conference West Division. He also set a school record with 16 assists in a game against Barton Community College.

With basketball season starting to gear up, Blue Dragon basketball fans are starting to get excited. The Blue Dragons have played three regular season games so far, winning all three of them.

Giles has started in all three those of games and has been a huge strength on the court. In the three games the Blue Dragons have played, Giles has averaged 11.7 points, has three assists, two steals and six rebounds. ;

Doreen Welsh, ‘Miracle on the Hudson’ flight attendant, speaks at Dillon Lecture Series

November 9th, 2018

By Tabitha Barr
Opinion Page Editor

Flying is a common source of transportation for people all around the world. Some people love it, others fear it, but it’s a necessity nonetheless.

For Doreen Welsh, flying was normalcy because it was her job for 38 years. She spoke Tuesday at the Sports Arena during the Dillon Lecture Series. But on Jan. 15, 2009, her life changed in 90 seconds. She was on the crash of flight 1549 but it was later renamed the Miracle of the Hudson. According to Cliff Moore, they were “hailed as heroes,” and will forever be known as that.

Welsh was on her final day of a four-day flight journey and was ready to go home to her son. The flight was taking off from New York’s LaGuardia Airport to Charlotte, North Carolina.
She did her normal routine with the other stewardesses and flight attendants, and she headed to her set position in the back of the plane and buckled up.
Minutes after takeoff, the plane made a jerking motion and Welsh caught a whiff of a “burning smell” that was not normal. She, at first, thought it was something technical and thought that they would just go back to the airport to fix it.
After checking around for signs of danger, she noticed that it was eerily quiet.
“It was total silence,” she said.
Welsh realized the engines weren’t running.
After gesturing to the flight attendants up front, she decided that the pilots didn’t have time to announce what was happening. So she sat back down and buckled up. Seconds after, she heard three words that came from the cockpit that she had been training for in her 38 years. She never thought she would actually here it.
“Brace for impact.”
After a pause of silence, she said, “I remember the terror rippling through my body.”
In the seconds that she had to process it, her thoughts exploded.
“I was in denial,” Welsh said. “This happens to other people, this does not happen to me.”
She then thought through her whole life of the good times. She saw her family, her son, and everything that made her life good.
In those moments, adrenaline kicks in and the brain is put on survival mode. Welsh’s went from zero to 100 in a split second. Truly, that is what kept her going through the whole crash.
She looked in front of her at the passengers and they were praying, phoning loved ones, and holding hands with the people around them, whether they knew their neighbor or not. She remembers thinking, “Everyone had a set of eyes to look to, but I was back there alone.”
Ninety seconds of bracing, and then impact happened. The back of the plane was the first to crash, which is where Welsh was stationed. Because her adrenaline was so high, Welsh didn’t realize that a piece of metal actually came through the bottom of the plane and sliced into her leg on impact.
At this point, water was seeping into the aircraft and was accumulating fast. She kept trying to close the seal of the door, but she didn’t realize that a huge hole behind her station had been torn open. Knowing that no one could evacuate through that door because of the water, she yells for passengers to go forwards because backwards is a complete no-go.
By this time, the water has increased up to her chest and three passengers were frozen with fear and aren’t responding to her commands to move. She could have easily put her life first and gone past them for her own safety, but she couldn’t do that. At that point, she stood at a certain point and accepted that that was where she was going to die. But she had this voice in her head that said, “One more time, go for it.”
So the next thing she knew, she was closer to the exit and the passengers. Welsh managed to make sure that everyone in her group was out of the plane before she left and went to one of the rafts.
When she went to grab her life vest, this is when she saw her torn up leg for the first time. It was a shock. Especially when she was the person with the worst injuries. She was the only one from the plane that had to have surgery.
Welsh had two heroes that night, one being a ferry boat passenger that helped her from the raft and keeping her warm and calm. The second was an New York police officer who stayed with her until her son showed up for her.
After two courageous people helped her on her way, Welsh was taken to the hospital for surgery. The first face she saw was her son and he greeted her with an “I love you but you are done flying.”
From this whole experience, Welsh has gained a new perspective on life. She’s made relationships with the people on that plane that would have never been if this didn’t happen.
Yes, this was a very difficult experience to go through, but it taught Welsh a lot about herself and life. There are many things she wants people to take away from her emotional story but there are two that she pointed out. The first is to “tell the people you love that you love them because you just don’t know what’s around the corner.” And the second is life is just about the people you love and making memories that make life better.
The reason this event is so incredible is because there were no fatalities. It could have been known as the crash of Flight 1549 but because the plane staff did their jobs and everyone helped others out, it has gone down in history as the Miracle of the Hudson. Welsh is known to many about her experience, but to those passengers, she is know at savior of that day.

Flying is a common source of transportation for people all around the world. Some people love it, others fear it, but it’s a necessity nonetheless.

For Doreen Welsh, flying was normalcy because it was her job for 38 years. She spoke Tuesday at the Sports Arena during the Dillon Lecture Series. But on Jan. 15, 2009, her life changed in 90 seconds. She was on the crash of flight 1549 but it was later renamed the Miracle of the Hudson. According to Cliff Moore, they were “hailed as heroes,” and will forever be known as that.

Welsh was on her final day of a four-day flight journey and was ready to go home to her son. The flight was taking off from New York’s LaGuardia Airport to Charlotte, North Carolina.
She did her normal routine with the other stewardesses and flight attendants, and she headed to her set position in the back of the plane and buckled up.
Minutes after takeoff, the plane made a jerking motion and Welsh caught a whiff of a “burning smell” that was not normal. She, at first, thought it was something technical and thought that they would just go back to the airport to fix it.
After checking around for signs of danger, she noticed that it was eerily quiet.
“It was total silence,” she said.
Welsh realized the engines weren’t running.
After gesturing to the flight attendants up front, she decided that the pilots didn’t have time to announce what was happening. So she sat back down and buckled up. Seconds after, she heard three words that came from the cockpit that she had been training for in her 38 years. She never thought she would actually here it.
“Brace for impact.”
After a pause of silence, she said, “I remember the terror rippling through my body.”
In the seconds that she had to process it, her thoughts exploded.
“I was in denial,” Welsh said. “This happens to other people, this does not happen to me.”
She then thought through her whole life of the good times. She saw her family, her son, and everything that made her life good.
In those moments, adrenaline kicks in and the brain is put on survival mode. Welsh’s went from zero to 100 in a split second. Truly, that is what kept her going through the whole crash.
She looked in front of her at the passengers and they were praying, phoning loved ones, and holding hands with the people around them, whether they knew their neighbor or not. She remembers thinking, “Everyone had a set of eyes to look to, but I was back there alone.”
Ninety seconds of bracing, and then impact happened. The back of the plane was the first to crash, which is where Welsh was stationed. Because her adrenaline was so high, Welsh didn’t realize that a piece of metal actually came through the bottom of the plane and sliced into her leg on impact.
At this point, water was seeping into the aircraft and was accumulating fast. She kept trying to close the seal of the door, but she didn’t realize that a huge hole behind her station had been torn open. Knowing that no one could evacuate through that door because of the water, she yells for passengers to go forwards because backwards is a complete no-go.
By this time, the water has increased up to her chest and three passengers were frozen with fear and aren’t responding to her commands to move. She could have easily put her life first and gone past them for her own safety, but she couldn’t do that. At that point, she stood at a certain point and accepted that that was where she was going to die. But she had this voice in her head that said, “One more time, go for it.”
So the next thing she knew, she was closer to the exit and the passengers. Welsh managed to make sure that everyone in her group was out of the plane before she left and went to one of the rafts.
When she went to grab her life vest, this is when she saw her torn up leg for the first time. It was a shock. Especially when she was the person with the worst injuries. She was the only one from the plane that had to have surgery.
Welsh had two heroes that night, one being a ferry boat passenger that helped her from the raft and keeping her warm and calm. The second was an New York police officer who stayed with her until her son showed up for her.
After two courageous people helped her on her way, Welsh was taken to the hospital for surgery. The first face she saw was her son and he greeted her with an “I love you but you are done flying.”
From this whole experience, Welsh has gained a new perspective on life. She’s made relationships with the people on that plane that would have never been if this didn’t happen.
Yes, this was a very difficult experience to go through, but it taught Welsh a lot about herself and life. There are many things she wants people to take away from her emotional story but there are two that she pointed out. The first is to “tell the people you love that you love them because you just don’t know what’s around the corner.” And the second is life is just about the people you love and making memories that make life better.
The reason this event is so incredible is because there were no fatalities. It could have been known as the crash of Flight 1549 but because the plane staff did their jobs and everyone helped others out, it has gone down in history as the Miracle of the Hudson. Welsh is known to many about her experience, but to those passengers, she is know at savior of that day.