Featured #1

Down go the champs: HutchCC football busts Garden City

Down go the champs: HutchCC football busts Garden City

By Lucas Barlow Sports Editor Saturday’s football clash in Garden City saw a thrilling contest come down to the final minutes. The Hutchinson Community College Blue Dragons traveled out west to face the defending NJCAA national champions - Garden City Community College.... [Read more...]

Featured #2

Hutchinson native comes back for DLS

Hutchinson native comes back for DLS

By Cassidy Crites Staff writer The third speaker for the 2017 Ray and Stella Dillon Lecture Series features Hutchinson native Sean James. Held at the Sports Arena, James will speak at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. The lecture is open to the public, and costs $10 to attend. However, Hutchinson... [Read more...]

Featured #3

The unfortunate events of Brenna, Part 2

The unfortunate events of Brenna, Part 2

By Brenna Eller Opinion Page Editor Every child has a dream, and many other dreams after that. I went through various phases as a child, but one dream stuck with me for a while. Since there has been talk of “Gruesome Playground Injuries”, which is a play going on... [Read more...]

Featured #4

Tutoring for Students

Tutoring for Students

By Emma Cox Campus Editor Being in college you may find yourself struggling in a certain class and need a little extra help with homework. That is where Hutchinson Community College’s on-campus tutoring services come in. The services are provided in Rimmer Learning Resource... [Read more...]

Featured #5

Constitution Day Celebrated Early

Constitution Day Celebrated Early

By Amanda Carney Online Editor September 17, 1787 was the day that the United States Constitution was signed by 39 brave men. September 17 is known as Constitution Day across the country. Hutchinson Community College celebrated a couple days early on September 15 by having guest... [Read more...]

Featured #6

HutchCC sophomore enjoys his traveling band

HutchCC sophomore enjoys his traveling band

HutchCC sophomore Isaac Glover sings during a recent performance of his band, Community Theatre. Photo courtesy Isaac Glover. By Jack Greenwood Staff writer When one first meets Isaac Glover, Hutchinson sophomore, it isn’t hard to see that he is easily one of the nicest... [Read more...]

News

Hutchinson native comes back for DLS

By Cassidy Crites
Staff writer

The third speaker for the 2017 Ray and Stella Dillon Lecture Series features Hutchinson native Sean James. Held at the Sports Arena, James will speak at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. The lecture is open to the public, and costs $10 to attend. However, Hutchinson Community College students are free.

“Sean James was picked to be part of the Dillon Lecture Series by a committee of individuals who meet regularly and plan the speakers for each year. There were several elements about Sean that appealed to the committee,” Dillon Lecture Series Coordinator for the College, Robin Woodworth said.

James travels the country spreading awareness and educating students and adults on bullying, leadership and how to strive to be your personal best while helping others.

Beginning his athletic career at Hutchinson High School, James continued it as a Blue Dragon, and then professionally. He went on to create the Sean James Student Athletes Foundation (SAJA) in 2007. He has been able to use his experiences as an athlete to grasp what young student-athletes need in order to realize their full potential.

In 2011, Sean’s work gained recognition by Buick and the NCAA Human Highlight Reel, the first edition. This award celebrates human achievement by praising student-athletes that continue to show leadership and dedicate themselves after they have completed their academic programs, and stayed active in their communities, positively influencing others.

Sean founded Be In The Know About Bullying in 2012. His goal was to provide education and mentorship to students in order to help them be leaders and combat bullying.

“It is our hope students can take away an increased desire to better themselves not only academically but through greater community involvement,” Woodworth said.

September 22, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Tutoring for Students

By Emma Cox
Campus Editor

Being in college you may find yourself struggling in a certain class and need a little extra help with homework. That is where Hutchinson Community College’s on-campus tutoring services come in. The services are provided in Rimmer Learning Resource Center.

One of the best parts about the tutoring services is that you can do a drop-in anytime Rimmer is open, and get help with either math or writing. For help in writing, go to the front desk and someone will place you with whomever is available. For help in math, drop by room 109.

Another way you can receive tutoring and can’t make it to Rimmer, is to try the online services. For help in math and writing, you can send an email to tutors@hutchcc.edu, or submit questions to service’s discussion forums in the public Learning Zone course, “Tutor Services.” The course itself provides helpful handouts and web links.

You can also set up to meet with a personal tutor if you need help with a subject that the drop-in labs and SI sessions don’t cover, or they aren’t your style of learning or fit your schedule. You have the opportunity to request a personal tutor who will meet with you and perhaps one other person in your class. You will be able to arrange regular appointments for one or two hours a week in Rimmer or online. If they don’t have a tutor for your class they will try to find one or will recommend another method for you to get the help you need.

To set up personal tutoring, you can complete the Personal Tutoring Request Form or stop by Rimmer’s front desk.

If you are an athlete, your schedules are filled with practices and games. These can cut into your study time. As a way to help athletes succeed academically, certain coaches and Rimmer staff arrange tutoring in the evenings during the fall and spring semesters inside Rimmer. This will provide athletes with tutors and access to a computer lab to work on assignments and online classes.

Specific academic departments will provide tutoring for courses offered through their departments. All you have to do is contact the department desired to see what tutoring they provide.

Do not hesitate to get help if you are struggling with any of your classes. It is best to get a tutor rather than fail out of school.

The classes you can get help for are as follows:

· Math

· English

· Language

· Business

· Technology

· History

· Fine Arts

· Communication

September 20, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Constitution Day Celebrated Early

By Amanda Carney
Online Editor

September 17, 1787 was the day that the United States Constitution was signed by 39 brave men.

September 17 is known as Constitution Day across the country. Hutchinson Community College celebrated a couple days early on September 15 by having guest a speaker, local attorney Scott Mann.

Mann has been practicing law for more than 31 years. He started his own law firm in 1999, Mann Law Offices. Today, his firm is called Mann, Wyatt & Rice, LLC.

Mann started by giving the audience in the Justice Theater a pamphlet with a Constitution Day quiz. Some questions where basic, like who is known as “the father of the Constitution?” Thomas Jefferson is the father of the Constitution. Or, prior to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920 women could not…? Answer was, women did not have the right to vote for president prior to 1920.

Other questions were a little harder, like who was unanimously elected to preside over the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia? The answer is, George Washington was unanimously elected.

Mann covered everything from ratifying the constitution to the Great Compromise.

Life, liberty, freedom, and prosperity, that’s what America is built of.

Ten Interesting Facts about the Constitution from constitutionfacts.com:

1. The constitution and liberty bell miss spelled Pennsylvania.

2. Ben Franklin signed the constitution at the age 81, he was the oldest member to sign.

3. Jonathan Dayton of New Jersey was the youngest member to sign the constitution at the age of 26.

4. The Constitution only has 4,400 words.

5. The Constitution was created in 100 days.

6. There were only two presidents that signed the Constitution, George Washington and James Madison.

7. The Constitution has only been changed 17 times.

8. The Constitution is the oldest and shortest document of any government in the word.

9. The word “democracy” does not appear in the constitution.

10. Constitution Day is September 17th.

September 20, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Managing money in college

By Emma Cox
Campus editor

As a college student, you are always trying to find ways to save and make money to get through each semester.

If you are staying in the dorms, take advantage of your provided meal plan. You’re paying for the meals, so it’s best to get your money’s worth instead of going out and buying a bunch of food, go to the cafeteria.

If you do go shopping, try and get a shopper’s card so you can get special deals on certain items. If you choose to eat out somewhere, try to pick a place that is inexpensive but is still tasteful. Nothing is worse than paying for a bad meal at a pricey restaurant.

Another way to save money is to pay attention in your classes to keep your grades up. You are paying for each class you take, and there is no sense in wasting money on not going and failing. If you are struggling in a class, use the resources available, such as going to the Rimmer Learning Center and getting help from a tutor, and using the library for research. Don’t forget to keep up with scholarship renewal dates and take the time to apply and turn in applications on time too.

Save up your pocket change, it will add up a lot in the long run. You can also try and get a part-time job so you can have extra money to get your essentials, and you don’t have to worry about going broke.

September 11, 2017 | Leave a Comment

TIPS allows students to report concerns

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

Hutchinson Community College’s Threat Assessment, Incident Management and Prevention Services, or TIPS, is a new incident reporting system that allows you to get help if you are in a bad situation that isn’t as serious as a 911 incident, but is still a concern.
If you don’t want to be blamed or if you don’t want them to know who you are, you can still report the misconduct or abuse as an anonymous user, although, they like to know who is contacting them in case the incident happens again, or to different people.

“Yes, I think it is a very helpful system, because you can report anything that is causing you stress, and no one has to know who the complaint was from,” HutchCC freshman Abbey Rush said.
Jake Gunden, HutchCC’s Coordinator of Equity and Compliance, is optimistic and proud of TIPS.

“TIPS is a web-based incident reporting and prevention platform that’s intended to improve campus safety and increase efficiencies in threat assessment and investigation processes,” Gunden said. “According to Awareity, HutchCC was the first college in Kansas to utilize TIPS and, to my knowledge, remains one of only a handful of regional institutions to offer such a system to its campus community.”

You can find TIPS on the HutchCC website, www.hutchcc.edu, at the bottom of the page. There will be a small short-cut if you just want the reporting page. If you are wanting information about it, go to “Campus Safety and Equity.” Then go to “Equity and Compliance.” On that page, there will be information on what TIPS is and how it is used.
Here are a couple of scenarios that might help clarify what you should report or not:
Someone is following you and you have noticed for a while now. They wait for you after every class, they walk behind you all the way to your dorm, and sometimes you catch them taking pictures of you. Should you report it? The answer is yes, especially if they have been taking pictures without your consent, and if this is a reoccurrence.

A woman is walking down the hall and is harassed by the same group of guys that are always there. They whistle and say gross things. You must be careful in this situation because there is a fine line between a cat-call and a sexual misconduct. If the group of guys were threatening to do something to the woman, that would call for a report, if not, the best that HutchCC can do is tell the guys to knock it off in a private meeting.

Other reasons include:
1. academic dishonesty/disruption
2. ADA or accessibility issues
3. alcohol/drug/tobacco violations
4. Personal safety
5. Sexual harassment
6. Sexual misconduct
7. Student code of conduct violations
8. Threat to others
9. Threat to self/suicide
10. Or workplace issues/concerns.
11. Users can also upload pictures, screenshots, or videos they may have related to their concern to provide officials access to evidence supporting the incident report.

September 11, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Student safety is a campus priority

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian editor

With every new school year comes a new batch of students, either beginning or continuing their higher education at Hutchinson Community College. For many, college is a new world of experiences, a new town to explore, new people to meet and new opportunities to do as you please.
As exciting as a new year may be, it’s important to remember that personal safety.
Steve Dunmire, Lead Security Officer, has seen some of the mistakes that students make on campus that put themselves or others in harm’s way.
“Pay attention to what you’re doing,” Dunmire said. “I had an instructor last week frustrated by the number of students walking in the streets between the dorms and campus on their phone.”
However, students in the streets on their phones isn’t the only problem. Texting and driving, as has been said for many years, is a large concern especially around campus where there are many students walking in high traffic areas.
Dunmire said he hopes to create campus-wide public-service announcements to inform students about situational awareness.
“Lock your cars,” Dunmire said. “The number of purses and laptops and valuable objects lying in cars just amazes me. This isn’t a small rural area, there are dishonest people and thieves amongst us.”
In addition to making sure your vehicles are locked, Dunmire suggested that students also hide anything that may attract attention such as book bags and purses.
“We have approximately 3,000 new people every year, so a lot of this is repetitious but it needs to be said year after year after year because some people arrive and they don’t think about it since it’s a new environment.”
When it comes to the dorms there are several more things that students should be aware of. Shelby Branting and Kathy Marquez of the Resident Life Office remind students of the importance of utilizing the provided safes and of letting somebody know where you’re going.
All suites currently are equipped with two locking safes bolted to dressers. By the end of next year, according to Branting, all dorm rooms will have safes.
“It’s a nice thing we can provide for the students that they don’t have to buy,” Branting said. “We have people from everywhere who bring very important things with them and this is their home. The safes help protect their valuables, especially passports.”
Apart from keeping valuables safe, it’s important to care for your own safety which can be easily achieved by letting a friend know when you plan on going out.
“Do the buddy system,” Marquez said. “Let people know where you’re going and that you’ll message them at a certain time. Some people don’t do these things because they’re embarrassed but there’s nothing to be embarrassed about. It’s just safety.”

September 8, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Eclipse provides college with rare experience

Rilee Carson, Lindsborg freshman, gazes at the solar eclipse Monday afternoon. Photo by The Collegian staff.

Rilee Carson, Lindsborg freshman, gazes at the solar eclipse Monday afternoon. Photo by The Collegian staff.

By Emma Cox

The Hutchinson Collegian

Monday, around 1 p.m., the students and staff of Hutchinson Community College got to experience what some have said is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The solar eclipse.

During the eclipse, students and staff gathered around Parker Student Union with their viewing glasses and a multitude of different protective wear. A majority of the people watching were under the impression that you had to use the specially-made eclipse glasses sold at various retailers, but that is was not the case. Kyle Nachtigal, Hutchinson sophomore, used a welding helmet to protect his eyes from the powerful sun rays, which were nearly 94 percent blocked by the moon.

Jackie Long, student advisor, brought out a tissue box with a piece of a weld helmet attached and watched the phenomenon take place. There are several other ways to protect your sight, such as the cereal-box method.

This method includes putting a strip of paper at the bottom of a box, which helps catch the light. At the top of the box, cut two holes, leaving a section in the middle. Cover one of the holes with tin foil and use a pin to poke a hole through the middle of the foil to create a path for the sun to shine through. After you have finished the project, you can now put your back to the sun and hold up the box so the sun can shine through the foil and you can see the reflection of the sun.

The cereal box method raised a lot of questions about safety. According to Tom Holcomb, the director of visitor experience at the Cosmosphere, the cereal box method is a safe way to follow the progress of the eclipse without causing damage.

A few people wondered about the safety of their pets going outside while the eclipse took place.

“It is completely safe for pets. Animals don’t tend to look at the sun due to their natural instinct,” Holcomb said.

As it was mentioned before, it is a once in a lifetime experience to see a solar eclipse, but that doesn’t mean you will miss out on other forms of an eclipse.

“Every seven years there is an eclipse of some kind that will occur,” Holcomb said. So if you didn’t get a chance to watch this solar eclipse you can still try and catch a lunar eclipse.”

August 25, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Student hit in Plum Street crosswalk

On Aug. 23 at the intersection of 13th and Plum Street, Ashley Griffith, HCC student, was hit by a car.
Hutchinson Police report that Griffith was sitting on the curb when the EMS arrived. She then was taken to the Hutchinson Regional Medical Center for treatment. The accident happened on Plum Street, which separates the campus and the new parking lot. There are two points to cross from that lot, across Plum to campus.
One is at 12th Street and the other one at 13th Street. The 12th Street crosswalk has yellow lights that flash when students are crossing, as well as warning signs. The crosswalk at 13th Street has signs, but no flashing lights. Steve Dunmire, head of security on campus, heard the police dispatch on his radio and got to the scene right away.
“She was in pain,” Dunmire said. “She had an abrasion on the head and the EMS immobilized her right arm.”
Despite some rumors around campus, it was not a hit and run. The driver stayed there and showed concern for the young lady. Valery Avery, 47,  was cited for failure to yield to a pedestrian and inattentive driving, according to the police report.

[Read more...]
Dr. Carter File, president of Hutchinson Community College, talked  about the accident.
“I was concerned about the young lady, of course; it’s a terrible thing to happen to anyone,” File said. “I am feeling sympathy for her.”
When the parking lot on Plum street was planned to be built, the college had the intention to get signal lights on the crosswalk.
“We asked the city to approve a crosswalk light several months ago,” File said. The city still hasn’t given the approval.
On the day of the accident File again called the city to ask about  crosswalk lights. “They were understanding and concerned about what had happened,” he said. Once the city approves the light, the college will have to fund it, he said.

There may be concerns by the city that Plum would have too many stops for motorists. When asked if he worried about public opinion about another crossing light, File’s answer was straight forward. “Not a bit. It is not a matter of public opinion; it is about the safety of the students and faculty.”

There may be concerns by the city that Plum would have too many stops for motorists.

When asked if he was worried about the public opinion about another crossing light, File’s answer was straight forward. “Not a bit. It is not a matter of public opinion; it is about the safety of the students and faculty.”

They are hoping to get the approval for the crosswalk light before the end of this fall semester.

It is important to be reminded that even if cars are required to stop for pedestrian anywhere and at anytime, it is better be safe than getting hurt.

It is the driver’s fault in any accident on a cross-walk, but stop before stepping out. Be careful and watch for cars that might come speeding through just as you are crossing.

September 22, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Fire Science’s Westfahl to retire

By Shelby Horton

Hutchinson Community College will be saying goodbye to one of their most treasured employees.

Margy Westfahl, Fire Science Program secretary, has spent 34 and half years in service to HCC.

Making the choice to retire was not an easy one for Westfahl, as she reflected on the years she has spent here.

“The hardest part was deciding to leave,” she said. “It’s like moving into a different phase of life. I’ll miss all of the faculty, staff and students here.”
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Kroll plan at HCC does not monitor tax fraud

By Shelby Horton

Since the data breach on March 24, Hutchinson Community College employees have been concerned about being targeted by the attackers.

One of the first attacks happened to sociology instructor Kimberly Newberry and her husband when criminals attempted to file fraudulent taxes in their name.

Then another HCC staff member was hit as someone filed fraudulent taxes in her name. However, this staff member had been signed up with Kroll for over a week but was never notified when she was compromised. Instead she had to be notified by the IRS. She later reported the issue to HCC administrators, but continued to feel HCC was not doing enough to deal with the March 24 security breach.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Kroll clout panned

On April 19, Judy Archer, business and computer adjunct instructor at HCC, received a letter from the Internal Revenue Service.

The letter said her Social Security number had been compromised and someone had filed her taxes, than collected on it.

Archer had been signed up with Kroll for over a week and yet had not received any type of notification that she had been breached.

After receiving the letter, Archer went to check her status on Kroll’s website.

“When I checked my status it said that everything was still fine and it had nothing to report. That concerned me,” Archer said.

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment


Features

Tutoring for Students

By Emma Cox
Campus Editor

Being in college you may find yourself struggling in a certain class and need a little extra help with homework. That is where Hutchinson Community College’s on-campus tutoring services come in. The services are provided in Rimmer Learning Resource Center.

One of the best parts about the tutoring services is that you can do a drop-in anytime Rimmer is open, and get help with either math or writing. For help in writing, go to the front desk and someone will place you with whomever is available. For help in math, drop by room 109.

Another way you can receive tutoring and can’t make it to Rimmer, is to try the online services. For help in math and writing, you can send an email to tutors@hutchcc.edu, or submit questions to service’s discussion forums in the public Learning Zone course, “Tutor Services.” The course itself provides helpful handouts and web links.

You can also set up to meet with a personal tutor if you need help with a subject that the drop-in labs and SI sessions don’t cover, or they aren’t your style of learning or fit your schedule. You have the opportunity to request a personal tutor who will meet with you and perhaps one other person in your class. You will be able to arrange regular appointments for one or two hours a week in Rimmer or online. If they don’t have a tutor for your class they will try to find one or will recommend another method for you to get the help you need.

To set up personal tutoring, you can complete the Personal Tutoring Request Form or stop by Rimmer’s front desk.

If you are an athlete, your schedules are filled with practices and games. These can cut into your study time. As a way to help athletes succeed academically, certain coaches and Rimmer staff arrange tutoring in the evenings during the fall and spring semesters inside Rimmer. This will provide athletes with tutors and access to a computer lab to work on assignments and online classes.

Specific academic departments will provide tutoring for courses offered through their departments. All you have to do is contact the department desired to see what tutoring they provide.

Do not hesitate to get help if you are struggling with any of your classes. It is best to get a tutor rather than fail out of school.

The classes you can get help for are as follows:

· Math

· English

· Language

· Business

· Technology

· History

· Fine Arts

· Communication

September 20, 2017 | Leave a Comment

HutchCC’s cosmetology school a ‘cut’ above the rest

By Amanda Carney

Online editor

The magic behind the coloring, cutting and styling hair all begins at the Hutchinson Community School of Cosmetology.

Yes, you heard that right. HutchCC has its very own cosmetology school and salon. Many students and staff are unaware that HutchCC even has a cosmetology program. The cosmetology salon is located off the main campus at 300-398 N Poplar St. This is where the one-year cosmetology program starts. The program offers two start dates, one in June and the other in July.

During this one-year program, students get to learn everything, from scalp conditions to cutting hair. In addition to the one-year program, students are allowed to take an additional 19-hour credit associate and applied science in cosmetology.

Bronwen Anderson, a student at HutchCC said, “Coloring class was my favorite. You can learn so many different things. With coloring, you can do whatever you want.”

Anderson has always had a passion for hair.

“I started cosmetology school when I was 18, but was unable to finish,” she said. “Now, 10 years later, I have the opportunity to finish.”

Someday, Anderson said she hopes to own her own salon.

But why choose HutchCC cosmetology school? Anderson said it was as simple as taking a tour to fall in love with the place.

“I took a tour, and loved the atmosphere and knew that it was a great place to learn,” Anderson said.

Anderson also wanted to stay local while going to cosmetology school. When the girls are out on the floor, there is always an instructor nearby to offer any help needed. The students are also required to get an instructor’s approval before starting with a client. In addition, students must have an instructor approve their work before the client leaves.

You don’t have to break the bank looking for an affordable haircut either. HutchCC cosmetology schools offers a 30 percent discount on all services to any HutchCC students and staff. All you have to do is show your HutchCC ID or your Dragon Zone account.

“HutchCC cosmetology school is a really great place to consider if you are interested in cosmetology. The instructors here are great.” Anderson said.

Anderson also wanted to stay local while going to cosmetology school. When the girls are out on the floor, there is always an instructor nearby to offer any help needed. The students are also required to get an instructor’s approval before starting with a client. In addition, students must have an instructor approve their work before the client leaves.

You don’t have to break the bank looking for an affordable haircut either. HutchCC cosmetology schools offers a 30 percent discount on all services to any HutchCC students and staff. All you have to do is show your HutchCC ID or your Dragon Zone account.

“HutchCC cosmetology school is a really great place to consider if you are interested in cosmetology. The instructors here are great.” Anderson said.

September 15, 2017 | Leave a Comment

First theater production to be “gruesome”

By Jack Greenwood
Staff writer

The stage is set, the crew is in the wings, and the cast is in place for the Hutchinson Community College theater program’s debut production of the season - “Gruesome Playground Injuries.”

But the audience may be surprised to learn the cast it is about to watch consists of only two people. The characters are Doug and Kaylene. The play - which is a drama despite the playful-sounding title - begins with the characters at age 8, but then jumps to 23 and then back to 13, and keeps jumping until eventually ending at 33. The play showcases the characters throughout various stages of their lives, but does not go in chronological order, other than beginning as children and ending as adults.

As the show progresses, the audience learns that neither Kaylene nor Doug are your typical characters. Kaylene has tendencies to harm herself and Doug is prone to doing violent stunts. They both endure injuries that are … Gruesome. The play delves deep into the realm of mental illness and the effects it has on oneself and the people around them. It showcases a friendship that is both beautiful and toxic.

Because of the controversial and graphic content and language of the show, it is not advised that children attend.

The play is followed by a talkback, which will engage the audience, cast and crew in a discussion about some of the dark subjects within the show. Audience members are encouraged to share their stories and experiences should they feel comfortable enough.

“Gruesome Playground Injuries” was written by Rajiv Joseph in 2009. It has been featured in off-Broadway productions.

The cast consists of Gabby Hernandez as Kaylene and Jack Riley Greenwood as Doug. The show is directed by Deidre Mattox and runs September 21-23, starting at 7:30 p.m. each day at Stringer Fine Arts. There is no intermission for the production, which is expected to last more than an hour.

Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for senior citizens, and non-HutchCC students are $5. All HutchCC students, staff and faculty are free with school identification.

September 14, 2017 | Leave a Comment

HutchCC instructor braves the elements during Harvey

By Emma Cox
Campus Editor
Late in the evening on August 25, the city of Houston was forever changed due to Category 4 storm known as Hurricane Harvey.
Harvey took the lives of more than 60 people and injuring over a thousand more. One of Hutchinson Community College’s math instructors, Julie Crenshaw, saw first-hand the impact Harvey had on Houston.
Crenshaw and her family flew to Houston on the afternoon of August 26, a Saturday, the day after Harvey, for their planned cruise. There was only one other flight arriving at that time and the airport closed soon after. Their cruise was originally scheduled to leave the next morning, but Royal Caribbean delayed the cruise to Sunday night. By then, Crenshaw and her family were stranded in Houston and ended up staying at the Courtyard Marriott in North Houston.
“Houston we have a problem. But seriously though, I was just in disbelief.” Crenshaw said when she saw the impact of Hurricane Harvey.
Since their cruise line didn’t get canceled, they thought it wouldn’t be a big deal, but they were wrong.
“I’ve seen pictures of the devastation from the floods before, but actually witnessing if firsthand was intense,” Crenshaw said. “We all just stared out the hotel windows in awe and in sadness.”
She also remembered feeling a strange overwhelming sense of calm among the hotel guests.
“I think we were all thankful to be safe.” Crenshaw said.
Crenshaw and her family relied on the hotel to provide them with food, water and shelter.
“On Sunday evening, the hotel staff actually started rationing our food,” Crenshaw said.
By Tuesday, the roads were starting to clear up, so the hotel shuttle made a few trips to local gas stations. Some of the gas stations only let a few customers in at a time, they were even turned away from one gas station by the attendant. By the end of the week, restaurants and stores were able to open, but only for limited hours due to a curfew.
Crenshaw saw some pretty disturbing sights while in Houston. There was a lot of dirty water and it just kept raining. The water was high enough Crenshaw and her family could see currents flowing through it.
“Houston has deep underpasses, about 16 feet deep, and the water would collect there and then people would drive down into it and drown,” Crenshaw said. “Police used their vehicles to block of the underpasses.”
Crenshaw said one of the hotel guests had to be evacuated due to medical needs, but she had to walk, escorted by her husband, about a block through knee-high water to the ambulance. She was tripping over curbs and parking blocks along the way.
When they left on the following Saturday, they saw the roads lined with mattresses, furniture, and trash from where everyone was starting to clean out their homes.
“It was a shocking sight.” Crenshaw said. “I will not be planning anymore vacations during hurricane season.”

September 13, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Managing money in college

By Emma Cox
Campus editor

As a college student, you are always trying to find ways to save and make money to get through each semester.

If you are staying in the dorms, take advantage of your provided meal plan. You’re paying for the meals, so it’s best to get your money’s worth instead of going out and buying a bunch of food, go to the cafeteria.

If you do go shopping, try and get a shopper’s card so you can get special deals on certain items. If you choose to eat out somewhere, try to pick a place that is inexpensive but is still tasteful. Nothing is worse than paying for a bad meal at a pricey restaurant.

Another way to save money is to pay attention in your classes to keep your grades up. You are paying for each class you take, and there is no sense in wasting money on not going and failing. If you are struggling in a class, use the resources available, such as going to the Rimmer Learning Center and getting help from a tutor, and using the library for research. Don’t forget to keep up with scholarship renewal dates and take the time to apply and turn in applications on time too.

Save up your pocket change, it will add up a lot in the long run. You can also try and get a part-time job so you can have extra money to get your essentials, and you don’t have to worry about going broke.

September 11, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Students can find good deals at Kansas State Fair

By Amanda Carney
Online editor

If you are looking for something fun to do, the Kansas State Fair is back and it’s in full swing starting today. Whether you are looking for some food to eat, or just hang out for a couple of hours or all day, the state fair is the perfect place for college students to go without breaking the bank.

Anyone looking to get in cheap should take advantage of the $1 admission day. This takes place on Monday. However, you must have purchased your tickets by Thursday with your Dillion’s Plus Card. Any night owls looking to avoid the gate fee can go any time after 9 p.m. and get in for free.

The fair offers all types of food, rides, exhibits and concerts. A fan favorite exhibit is the hypnotist Ron Diamond. Diamond will be at the fair September 17 at 5 p.m. The fair also offers a wide variety of concerts, from country artists, like Josh Turner, to rock bands Survivor and Loverboy. Survivor and Loverboy perform at 7 p.m. on Friday, while Turner performs at 5 p.m., Saturday.

For college students willing to spend some money, concert ticket prices start around $40, although ticket prices do range from artist to artist.  Former fair manager Denny Stoecklein, who is now Hutchinson Community College’s Director of Marketing and Public Relations, said, “In addition, there are hundreds of commercial exhibitors offering their wares, daily concerts and events in the grandstands, free entertainment throughout the grounds.”

Stoecklein also added “There are over 40 carnival rides to choose from and dozens of food options.”

Now, we all know you cannot go to the fair without eating some fair food.

“Food choices ranging from long-time favorites such as the Pronto Pup and funnel cakes, to the several local church and civic organizations with offerings available for just 10 days,” Stoecklein said.

New food at the fair this year consists of, deep fried turkey legs, bacon wrapped corn dogs and the muddy pig.

Stocecklein also pointed out a website that will be extremely helpful. “This year, the State Fair has launched a ‘finder’ on its website, www.kansasstatefair.com/p/fair/277. This website was invented to help you find food, merchandise or entertainment you are looking for,” Stoecklein said.

Keep in mind the State Fair starts Friday, and goes until September 17. The local State Fair is the perfect place to go have fun and eat food.

September 7, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Terry Masterson Twilight photos

Photos from the Terry Masterson Twilight cross country race, which was Friday night at Fun Valley Sports Complex. Photos by Allie Schweizer.

September 5, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Photos: Hutchinson soccer 6, Trinidad State 0

Photos by Merissa Anderson.

August 29, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Photos: Hutchinson football makes historic comeback in beating Coffeyville

A photo gallery of Hutchinson Community College’s 50-42 win Saturday against Coffeyville at Gowans Stadium. The Blue Dragons trailed 25-0 after the first quarter. The 25-point comeback is the biggest in school history.

August 28, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Eclipse provides college with rare experience

Rilee Carson, Lindsborg freshman, gazes at the solar eclipse Monday afternoon. Photo by The Collegian staff.

Rilee Carson, Lindsborg freshman, gazes at the solar eclipse Monday afternoon. Photo by The Collegian staff.

By Emma Cox

The Hutchinson Collegian

Monday, around 1 p.m., the students and staff of Hutchinson Community College got to experience what some have said is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The solar eclipse.

During the eclipse, students and staff gathered around Parker Student Union with their viewing glasses and a multitude of different protective wear. A majority of the people watching were under the impression that you had to use the specially-made eclipse glasses sold at various retailers, but that is was not the case. Kyle Nachtigal, Hutchinson sophomore, used a welding helmet to protect his eyes from the powerful sun rays, which were nearly 94 percent blocked by the moon.

Jackie Long, student advisor, brought out a tissue box with a piece of a weld helmet attached and watched the phenomenon take place. There are several other ways to protect your sight, such as the cereal-box method.

This method includes putting a strip of paper at the bottom of a box, which helps catch the light. At the top of the box, cut two holes, leaving a section in the middle. Cover one of the holes with tin foil and use a pin to poke a hole through the middle of the foil to create a path for the sun to shine through. After you have finished the project, you can now put your back to the sun and hold up the box so the sun can shine through the foil and you can see the reflection of the sun.

The cereal box method raised a lot of questions about safety. According to Tom Holcomb, the director of visitor experience at the Cosmosphere, the cereal box method is a safe way to follow the progress of the eclipse without causing damage.

A few people wondered about the safety of their pets going outside while the eclipse took place.

“It is completely safe for pets. Animals don’t tend to look at the sun due to their natural instinct,” Holcomb said.

As it was mentioned before, it is a once in a lifetime experience to see a solar eclipse, but that doesn’t mean you will miss out on other forms of an eclipse.

“Every seven years there is an eclipse of some kind that will occur,” Holcomb said. So if you didn’t get a chance to watch this solar eclipse you can still try and catch a lunar eclipse.”

August 25, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Scenes from Friday’s vigil in downtown Hutchinson

Photos by Merissa Anderson.

August 21, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Drugs seen by the school counselors

By Loribeth Reynolds

College can be full of tough decisions, like whether to wear pajamas to class, choosing homework over Netflix, or sleeping instead of partying. The time spent in college is easily some of the best times of a person’s life. However, some students have a different experience.

Many students have a hard time making these tough decisions and go down the wrong path. According to addictioncenter.com, no one is “immune” to drug or alcohol abuse. The site attributes social pressure, availability to drugs, and alcohol use. They suggest that students seek counseling if they find themselves on this path.

Hutchinson Community College students have access to free counseling services inside Parker Student Union. The sign on the door reads, “Student Success Center,” and all counselors are willing to help.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Hannah headed for the ocean

By Hannah Wallace

Dear Hannah, Are you sad that this is the last HCC newspaper you will be writing in?

Dear wondering, it is for sure a bittersweet moment for me.

I have enjoyed my time on the news staff but also know that there are bigger fish for me to fry out there in the world.

I am happy to say that me being on the staff has taught me a lot of life lessons that I will never forget.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment


Sports

Down go the champs: HutchCC football busts Garden City

By Lucas Barlow
Sports Editor

Saturday’s football clash in Garden City saw a thrilling contest come down to the final minutes.

The Hutchinson Community College Blue Dragons traveled out west to face the defending NJCAA national champions - Garden City Community College. However, the champs could not fend off the Blue Dragons as the Broncbusters dropped their second straight, as the Blue Dragons won 31-28.

HutchCC running back BJ Emmons was a force to be reckoned with, as he found gaps all over the defense, scoring four touchdowns on the ground and compiling 85 rushing yards. Quarterback Kendal Robinson threw for 184 yards on nine completions, with wide receiver Jawaun Johnson responsible for 85 of those yards. Luke Niemeyer scored the only fourth quarter points for the Blue Dragons, with a 27-yard field goal in the final seven minutes of the game.

Although HutchCC never trailed during the game, the Broncbusters never gave up as they scored a touchdown with only two minutes remaining to cut the deficit to only three points. Moments later, they recovered an onside kick.

After driving down the field, Garden City had a chance to win the game, but the quarterback was sacked on fourth down, completing the upset for the Blue Dragons.

Garden City CC falls to 2-2 as HutchCC improves to 3-1. Riding the momentum, the Blue Dragons return home to play yet another important conference game against Highland Community College at noon Saturday.

September 22, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Athlete of the week, Sept. 3-9: Brailey Moeder, soccer

The week: Moeder continues a strong tradition of former Hutchinson High players excelling for the Blue Dragons, as the freshman scored two goals and assisted four others in helping Hutchinson beat Hesston 4-0 and Barton 6-0.

The season: Moeder has five goals and four assists through five games for the undefeated and 19th-ranked Blue Dragons, who are 6-0 this season and also undefeated in Jayhawk West play. The Blue Dragons have outscored their opponents 26-0 headed to Saturday’s road trip to Goodland to take on Northwest Kansas Tech. They play at home Wednesday against Dodge City.

September 15, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Turner-ing the page: HutchCC linebacker comes back from injury

By Lucas Barlow
Sports Editor

For Colby Turner, the road to Division-I football has been anything but easy so far.

The Hutchinson Community College redshirt sophomore has endured multiple season injuries in his football career. A Hutchinson native, Turner played his high school days with the Salthawks. At Hutchinson High, he received first-team honors and even won a state title in 2011, calling it his “most memorable” achievement. The Salthawks made two more state-title appearances during his tenure.

However, during Turner’s junior year, he suffered a shoulder injury, leaving him sidelined for the rest of the season. Disaster struck once again as Turner’s knee was blown out when he was a senior, effectively ending his high school football career. For Turner, sitting on the bench was a “very agitating and humbling process, but it is part of the game. It makes you appreciative that you get to play the game as well.”

Turner continued his football career at his hometown’s college - HutchCC. As a freshman, he played seven games for the Blue Dragons and completed his first full season injury free in three years.

In the spring 2016, he was plagued by injuries as his shoulder was once again injured. This incident led to Turner redshirting his sophomore year.

“Some struggles that comes with injuries are one, the rehabilitation process, and two just making sure you stay positive,” Turner said.

But, he overcame these injuries by “keeping a positive mindset.”

“You just have to know that whatever happens is for a reason, and everyone has a plan no matter what,” Turner said.

In 2017, he is finally back on the field after a year off and he couldn’t feel any better.

“It feels great man. Words can’t really describe how it feels when you get the opportunity to play college football,” Turner said.

For his last season as a Blue Dragon, Turner has many goals such as being a “sound player,” and “focusing on the little things.”

His ultimate goal is to do what few players in the country can - play Division I football.

“I see myself playing the game as long as I can in the future,” Turner said.

Colby Turner’s story is a heart-warming one of perseverance, determination, and hard work, and it’s hard not to root for the sophomore.

September 14, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Volleyball off to successful start

By Lucas Barlow
Sports Editor

Since its season-opening win in New Mexico, the Hutchinson Community College volleyball team has found some success in multiple states. Along with their New Mexico wins over South Mountain Community College and Pima Community College, the Blue Dragons also picked up a 2-2 record in Idaho as well.

In Idaho, the Blue Dragons picked up wins against Salt Lake Community College and Northwest College. However, the Blue Dragons lost to both Snow College and College of Southern Idaho.

More importantly, the Blue Dragons have taken care of business in-state as they managed to stay a perfect 3-0 in the Jayhawk West, and 2-0 at home.

After about a third of the way through the season, the team’s overall record comes to 7-4.
Saturday marks the next game for the Blue Dragons, as they take on Colby Community College in a conference clash. It will be held in Colby starting at 2 p.m.

September 13, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Being a student-athlete comes with ample stress

HutchCC freshman Cassidy Crites goes for a kill in a match earlier this season against Garden City.

HutchCC freshman Cassidy Crites goes for a kill in a match earlier this season against Garden City.

By Cassidy Crites
Staff writer

From a different perspective looking in, it may seem as though college athletes have it all - free clothes, meals and scholarships. Not many realize the extent of the commitment to a sports team.

Being a collegiate student-athlete is more than the daily practice or road trip to a game on a school night. By the time you factor in how much time is spent on the road, at practice or doing team activities, it almost equals having a job. But wait, now let’s throw in school.

As a student athlete here at Hutchinson Community College, my mornings are filled with classes. while the afternoons bring volleyball and school work. Time management has now become my best friend. Between class, homework, practice and games, days can get stressful and busy. Luckily though, we have a mandatory study hall. It assures me time to work on my homework without distractions. Having limited time makes me focus on what’s important and helps me get my work done.

The tough part comes when classes are missed due to away games or tournaments. Keeping up on schoolwork while being on the road becomes difficult. It’s nice to have understanding teachers that realize our situation and work with us to stay on track.

While there are advantages and disadvantages to being a student athlete, the pros outweigh the cons. Being part of a team allows me to meet a whole new group of friends. Not only are they my teammates but also a support system. Being able to celebrate our wins and analyze our losses, it’s always nice to know they have my back.

Being a student-athlete is more than the time we put into the sport. As a student athlete, it allows us to put our school’s name on our backs and represent it doing what we’re passionate about.

In the end, every day spent in the classroom and every hour spent in the gym all becomes worth it when we’ve accomplished something we’ve worked so hard for.

September 8, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Soccer player is a (wrestling) champ

Hutchinson Community College freshman Kaelee Kimmel dribbles the ball during a game against Trinidad State this season. In addition to playing soccer in high school, Kimmel was a state-champion wrestler at Wichita South.

Hutchinson Community College freshman Kaelee Kimmel dribbles the ball during a game against Trinidad State this season. In addition to playing soccer in high school, Kimmel was a state-champion wrestler at Wichita South.

By Lucas Barlow

Sports editor

At first glance, Kaelee Kimmel is only a defender for the Hutchinson Community College women’s soccer team, but many don’t know that she is actually Kansas’ first women’s wrestling state champ in the 152-pound weight class.

In fact that’s only one of her many accomplishments. Others include being named the most valuable team member on her high school wrestling squad, receiving all-league honorable mention for City League soccer, and she earned a scholarship to play soccer for HutchCC.

Kimmel, a Wichita native, has been playing soccer since she was only 3-years old, while she didn’t start wrestling till fourth grade. She stated her dad, uncle and her cousins as inspirations to why she began wrestling, since they had all wrestled before. To her it was a “family thing.”

Kimmel’s first wrestling team was the local police department’s team, and her dad was the head coach. During sixth grade, she tore a tendon in her shoulder and left wrestling for a few years. Not until her junior year in high school did she begin to wrestle again.

At Wichita South, there was no girls wrestling team, so any girl that wanted to compete would have to join the boys team and wrestle primarily against boys.

Kimmel was one of the two girls on the squad. To get herself ready for a match, she would blast music and talk to her dad, who helped her prepare mentally for the match.

“Yeah you’re a girl, but you can still take them down,” was something Kimmel’s dad would tell her pre-match.

Earlier this year, McPherson hosted its first-ever Kansas state wrestling tournament for women. In the 152-pound weight class, Kimmel edged her opponent to win the first ever state championship in her weight class, a prestigious accomplishment.

When asked if wrestling has helped her in soccer, she replied “wrestling endurance is different than soccer endurance, but either way it’s always helped me out.”

Kimmel’s other interests include, reading, listening to music, singing and hanging out with friends. However, practice and games take up the majority of her time. She is also majoring in sports medicine and would like to either be an athletic trainer or a massage therapist.

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September 7, 2017 | Leave a Comment

The Collegian’s athlete of the week (Aug. 28-Sept. 2)

Hiebert, a Goessel sophomore, is The Collegian's athlete of the week.

Hiebert, a Goessel sophomore, is The Collegian athlete of the week.

Page Hiebert, sophomore volleyball

The week: Hiebert had two big performances in Hutchinson’s two conference wins. The Goessel sophomore had 11 kills, nine digs and four blocks in a win at Cloud County, and 14 kills and eight digs in a win against Garden City.

The season: Hiebert leads the Blue Dragons with 70 digs through six matches.

September 6, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Terry Masterson Twilight photos

Photos from the Terry Masterson Twilight cross country race, which was Friday night at Fun Valley Sports Complex. Photos by Allie Schweizer.

September 5, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Photos: Hutchinson soccer 6, Trinidad State 0

Photos by Merissa Anderson.

August 29, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Photos: Hutchinson football makes historic comeback in beating Coffeyville

A photo gallery of Hutchinson Community College’s 50-42 win Saturday against Coffeyville at Gowans Stadium. The Blue Dragons trailed 25-0 after the first quarter. The 25-point comeback is the biggest in school history.

August 28, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Blue Dragon soccer looks for another strong season

Sheena Nicol, left, is one of the top players in the NJCAA and for the Hutchinson Community College soccer team. Photo courtesy Hutchinson Community College sports information.

Sheena Nicol, left, is one of the top players in the NJCAA and for the Hutchinson Community College soccer team. Photo courtesy Hutchinson Community College sports information.

By The Collegian staff

All the Hutchinson Community College soccer team lost from last season was this - goal-scoring machine Jordan Downing, who notched a school-record 44 goals last year, and Jazmin Hartshorn, who was a rare 20-20 player with 20 goals and 22 assists.

Is a rebuilding year inevitable. Don’t bet on it.

The Blue Dragons, 17-2 last season, open their season at 5 p.m. Friday at home, and they should have plenty of firepower, new and returning.

Start with sophomore midfielder Sheena Nicol. The Scotland native plays with the strength of a cement truck and the finesse of a ballerina. She had a sensational freshman year with 29 goals and 14 assists.

Irish defender Chloe Flynn also returns, as does midfielders Emilee Kreibiel and Jayde Miyamoto, defender Kaitlyn Moore and goalkeeper Ashley Main.

A promising freshman class joins them, led by local product Brailey Moeder. Defender Kaelee Kimmel is a Wichita South product who won a state wrestling title last winter.

Coach Sammy Lane, the only coach in team history, has never had a losing record, has won at least 10 games every season and has five losses in a season just twice, which both came in the first three seasons of the program’s existence.

August 25, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Blue Dragon football looking to bounce back this season

By Lucas Barlow
The Hutchinson Collegian

This season marks coach Rion Rhoades’ 11th season for the Hutchinson Community College football team. A former Jayhawk Conference Coach of the Year, Rhoades has built an impressive 73-40 overall record and six Salt City bowl wins over his career.

However, after back to back 5-6 seasons, the Blue Dragons will look to bounce back this season. Although picked fourth in the preseason conference poll, Rhoades has high expectations for his team this year

“I expect us to compete for a conference championship,” Rhoades said.

The Blue Dragons are no stranger to conference champs, as they achieved the honor back in 2014, their first conference title since 1995.

The team returns multiple starters, but the defensive secondary will return most of the experience.

When asked who the key playmakers on the team are, Rhoades replied, “Not really one person. It will take an outstanding team effort to be successful.”

Saturday marks the season opener for the Blue Dragons, as they take on Coffeyville at Gowans Stadium. Kickoff is at noon. On September 16th, the Blue Dragons travel to Garden City, where they will play the Broncbusters, the defending national champions. Then on September 28th, they play Independence Community College, led by Malik Henry, a former Florida State player and former No. 2 high-school QB in the nation.

However, when Rhoades was asked which certain games were the most important, he simply replied, “The next one.”

August 25, 2017 | Leave a Comment


Entertainment

“It” gets favorable reviews from Collegian staff.

REVIEW 1

Emma Cox
Campus Editor

“It” is a movie like no other and by far one of the best movies I’ve seen in 2017. Playing on the fears of children through and alien clown is an ingenious way to mess with the minds of people when they are most vulnerable.

Compared to the original film, that was made in 1990, there is more gore, humor and points of fear not knowing what will happen next.

Both of the movies show kids who come together and help each other through their toughest times. I enjoy the play on the word ‘it’ in both films, the kids don’t know what is harming them, is ‘It’ a clown? Or is ‘It’ what they fear the most?

I would recommend this movie to anyone who gets a thrill off horror.

REVIEW 2

Brenna Eller
Opinion Editor

If I could sum up the 2017 movie, “It” with two words, they would be Game-Changer. I was quite surprised by the storyline of this remake of the classic 90s horror film. The story kept building more intense as it went because there was more description and in-depth character backgrounds.

Some parts were definitely predictable, but there were still times when my heart skyrocketed from jumping. There were also several differences between the two movies, one being the appearance of the kids compared to them in the older version. The teenagers sounded and looked more modern to me. Of course you can’t always capture the time period when you are years after, but I thought that the kids used way too many sexual jokes that would have most definitely been frowned upon in the 60s when this movie is based on.

One reason I really enjoyed the movie was because it was so personal. Each child had several experiences and in the 90s movie, the characters seemed a bit dull. Even if you haven’t read the book or watched the original movie, you will still be scared.

Overall I found this film very thrilling and intense, making it the best horror film I’ve seen so far in 2017. I am looking forward to the next chapter of “It” directed by Andy Muschietti.

September 22, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Acting has more than its share of stresses

By Jack Greenwood
Staff writer

You don’t have to be a fan of sports to know that athletes put themselves through hell to win a game or to advance in their athletic ability. One can see the work and demand that goes into their individual sports.

But what about those people you see in the movies, television and on stage? Do actors put themselves through that kind of emotional and physical demand, the same as athletes? While they may be two different ballgames, one might be surprised to know being an actor requires stamina, strength and endurance. I’m here to tell you the demand of being an actor takes a toll.

Currently, I am performing in the Hutchinson Community College production of  ”Gruesome Playground Injuries.” The show is immensely dark and follows characters that are prone to self harm and destruction. But unlike an athlete’s ability to leave the game on the field, the actor’s character stays with them.

I, personally, have fallen to exhaustion and felt myself succumbing to my character’s tendency to blow up and need to be extreme to find attention. At times, we can forget who we really are. We become these characters and sometimes it’s difficult to separate ourselves from them. But this isn’t the first character to follow me around like a shadow and believe me I’m not the first actor to have these issues.

A recent example is Jared Leto who portrayed “the Joker” in the film “Suicide Squad.” Leto has confessed that while getting into character he sent things like dead pigs to his cast mates because “that was the character.”

This has led Hollywood to take no chances while filming stories that go into a dark realm.

While filming the show “13 Reasons Why,” producers brought on therapy dogs and counselors to talk to the actors due to some of the emotional topics (suicide, rape, bullying, etc.) to ensure the actors were able to leave their characters on the set and avoid these topics in real life.

Aside from the emotional demands of being an actor, there is also a physical demand. Many people are aware of the gruesome details behind Leonardo Dicaprio’s performance in the film “The Revenant.” The actor lost an extreme amount of weight, had to perform in below freezing temperatures and crawled inside a bear carcass all to get the film done correctly.

Actors also have a tendency to learn new skills and trades for roles. Jennifer Lawrence learned archery for “The Hunger Games” and Dave Franco learned card throwing for his role on “Now You See Me” among several others. Many actors learn accents, shave or grow facial hair, lose or gain weight, all just to get into the audition room.

So yes, being an actor is difficult. Emotional roles take a toll on our own lives, while physical demands cause us to change our physique. But why do we do it? Because it’s what we live for. It’s both our drug and our high. It’s the small piece of art we can put into the world and we love it. And we wouldn’t change anything about it.

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September 22, 2017 | Leave a Comment

HutchCC sophomore enjoys his traveling band

HutchCC sophomore Isaac Glover sings during a recent performance of his band, Community Theatre.

HutchCC sophomore Isaac Glover sings during a recent performance of his band, Community Theatre. Photo courtesy Isaac Glover.

By Jack Greenwood
Staff writer

When one first meets Isaac Glover, Hutchinson sophomore, it isn’t hard to see that he is easily one of the nicest guys you could run into on the Hutchinson Community College campus.

But what one might not know is that Glover has a rich talent for singing, and playing guitar and showcases these talents playing in a local band called “Community Theatre.”

The band plays original music with a diverse sound that encompasses a lot of different genres, from indie rock to jazz. When asked how the band came together, Glover stated that “I don’t really know, I had always played in different bands, and then a friend said I should start one, and it all just kind of came together.”

Glover also said that the current band members were all friends before becoming band mates.

In addition to playing in the band, Glover is a full-time HutchCC student, works, and appears in theater productions within the college and community. One might think that Glover has a full plate even without the band, but he said, “It can be difficult at times to find time to rehearse but we love doing it so we make the time.”

Rehearsing is just the beginning of the band’s agenda. In addition to playing locally, the band has traveled all over the Midwest, playing concerts in a variety of venues, from houses to donut shops.

“Most of the bigger shows we’ve done are DIY (Do It Yourself), like house shows,” Glover said. “This summer, we played a really cool show in Iowa. Most of them are graduation parties, and people just come to party and have fun.”

With as much exposure the band is getting, Glover said the band’s fan base has grown, but that a large fan base isn’t necessarily its goal.

“I think our main goal is to have a good, solid fan base that respects our music and allows us to make a living doing what we love,” Glover said.

It is easy to see when talking with him, that Glover is passionate about his music and his band. It also makes one want to root for them and check out some of their work.

The band will be playing in Wichita at the Donut Hole Sept 26 and 29t For more information ‘Like’ Community Theatre on Facebook.

September 19, 2017 | Leave a Comment

First theater production to be “gruesome”

By Jack Greenwood
Staff writer

The stage is set, the crew is in the wings, and the cast is in place for the Hutchinson Community College theater program’s debut production of the season - “Gruesome Playground Injuries.”

But the audience may be surprised to learn the cast it is about to watch consists of only two people. The characters are Doug and Kaylene. The play - which is a drama despite the playful-sounding title - begins with the characters at age 8, but then jumps to 23 and then back to 13, and keeps jumping until eventually ending at 33. The play showcases the characters throughout various stages of their lives, but does not go in chronological order, other than beginning as children and ending as adults.

As the show progresses, the audience learns that neither Kaylene nor Doug are your typical characters. Kaylene has tendencies to harm herself and Doug is prone to doing violent stunts. They both endure injuries that are … Gruesome. The play delves deep into the realm of mental illness and the effects it has on oneself and the people around them. It showcases a friendship that is both beautiful and toxic.

Because of the controversial and graphic content and language of the show, it is not advised that children attend.

The play is followed by a talkback, which will engage the audience, cast and crew in a discussion about some of the dark subjects within the show. Audience members are encouraged to share their stories and experiences should they feel comfortable enough.

“Gruesome Playground Injuries” was written by Rajiv Joseph in 2009. It has been featured in off-Broadway productions.

The cast consists of Gabby Hernandez as Kaylene and Jack Riley Greenwood as Doug. The show is directed by Deidre Mattox and runs September 21-23, starting at 7:30 p.m. each day at Stringer Fine Arts. There is no intermission for the production, which is expected to last more than an hour.

Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for senior citizens, and non-HutchCC students are $5. All HutchCC students, staff and faculty are free with school identification.

September 14, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Students can find good deals at Kansas State Fair

By Amanda Carney
Online editor

If you are looking for something fun to do, the Kansas State Fair is back and it’s in full swing starting today. Whether you are looking for some food to eat, or just hang out for a couple of hours or all day, the state fair is the perfect place for college students to go without breaking the bank.

Anyone looking to get in cheap should take advantage of the $1 admission day. This takes place on Monday. However, you must have purchased your tickets by Thursday with your Dillion’s Plus Card. Any night owls looking to avoid the gate fee can go any time after 9 p.m. and get in for free.

The fair offers all types of food, rides, exhibits and concerts. A fan favorite exhibit is the hypnotist Ron Diamond. Diamond will be at the fair September 17 at 5 p.m. The fair also offers a wide variety of concerts, from country artists, like Josh Turner, to rock bands Survivor and Loverboy. Survivor and Loverboy perform at 7 p.m. on Friday, while Turner performs at 5 p.m., Saturday.

For college students willing to spend some money, concert ticket prices start around $40, although ticket prices do range from artist to artist.  Former fair manager Denny Stoecklein, who is now Hutchinson Community College’s Director of Marketing and Public Relations, said, “In addition, there are hundreds of commercial exhibitors offering their wares, daily concerts and events in the grandstands, free entertainment throughout the grounds.”

Stoecklein also added “There are over 40 carnival rides to choose from and dozens of food options.”

Now, we all know you cannot go to the fair without eating some fair food.

“Food choices ranging from long-time favorites such as the Pronto Pup and funnel cakes, to the several local church and civic organizations with offerings available for just 10 days,” Stoecklein said.

New food at the fair this year consists of, deep fried turkey legs, bacon wrapped corn dogs and the muddy pig.

Stocecklein also pointed out a website that will be extremely helpful. “This year, the State Fair has launched a ‘finder’ on its website, www.kansasstatefair.com/p/fair/277. This website was invented to help you find food, merchandise or entertainment you are looking for,” Stoecklein said.

Keep in mind the State Fair starts Friday, and goes until September 17. The local State Fair is the perfect place to go have fun and eat food.

September 7, 2017 | Leave a Comment

Scenes from Friday’s vigil in downtown Hutchinson

Photos by Merissa Anderson.

August 21, 2017 | Leave a Comment

‘Vendetta’ has sinister storyline

By Amaelle Caron

“V for Vendetta” is a movie inspired by the graphic novel by the same name.

The story takes place in the United Kingdom in a post-apocalyptic world, where war and dictatorship rule everything.

The main character, V (Hugo Weaving) is a revolutionary who wants to free the English people from their corrupt police state government.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Is the “g-spot” real? Harder to find than Bigfoot

Dear Shelby,

I love my partner but sometimes he messes up. How do I correct him without making him feel like he’s stupid?

Dear Delicate correction,

No one ever wants to feel dumb or stupid when he or she makes a mistake and has to be corrected or taught differently.

So when you have to attempt to correct your partner, you want to be as calm and understanding of the situation.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Oliver’s a treat in many ways

By Lariena Nokes

Breaking away from campus for a nice lunch is a fine way to reward yourself for jobs well done.

Hutchinson has a wonderful new restaurant well suited for just such outings. Oliver’s Beef & Brew at 925 East 30th is open for business and serving amazing food.

Dropping in for a late lunch, I was greeted by a friendly hostess who seated me quickly.

If you are familiar with Oliver’s from their previous bistros, then you know you can expect quality.

I had a cafe-style table in the poolroom and an attentive waiter who always had a smile.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Reboot for classic

By Troy Daugherty

Ratchet and Clank is a great new addition to the original video game series, and acts as a wonderful reboot to the franchise.

It’s easy for new players, like myself, to pick up and have a huge amount of fun.

In the game, you play as Ratchet, a talking animal with attitude to spare.

Ratchet, a mechanic, is sitting on a pole when he sees a spaceship fall from the sky and goes to investigate.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Friendship over crush

Just
Between
Us

By Shelby Horton

Dear Shelby,

I have a crush on my best friend and really want to pursue a relationship, but she is straight where as I’m a lesbian. Should I risk our friendship?

Dear Friendly crush,
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

McCarthy hits a downfall in movie “The Boss”

By Branson Strasner

At its best, Melissa McCarthy’s newest film “The Boss” is mediocre.

At its worst, it’s utter garbage.

Personally, I’m a fan of Melissa McCarthy, she was hilarious in “Bridesmaids” and alright in “The Heat”, but this movie is a stain on her reputation.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

‘Wolf’ kids charm fans

By Lariena Nokes

The imaginations of creative people can run wild.

The 2012 anime feature film “Wolf Children” takes the concept of form-shifting that does not exist in Japanese mythology and creates a modern day fairytale around the idea.

The Honshu wolf was forced into extinction in 1905; these two ideas are merged into Honshu werewolves.
[Read more...]

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment

Helping anxious love

Just
Between
Us

By Shelby Horton

Dear Shelby,

What are your qualifications to be giving advice out to the student body about sex?

Dear skeptical,

Though I am no doctor, therapist, or a researcher on sex, I am a student who is or has gone through some of the same things as what the other students are asking questions on.

If I do not know an answer to a question, I do what any person should do.

I conduct research and I ask more questions, I use scientific research, respected journals, and I even go as far as to ask doctors.

As a reporter I use those skills of investigation to get the best, unbiased answers I can give to my audience.

My main qualification is that I am a student who wants answers and has the experience to investigate in order to get the best attainable truth and facts.

Dear Shelby,

I work at a fast food restaurant and two of my co-workers have started a relationship. At first it was okay, but now it’s getting to be a problem. They flirt during the work day, they’re kissing when they think nobody’s looking, and if they’re having drama and they bring it to work, making all of the other workers uncomfortable. What do I do?

Dear drive-thru romance,

Co-workers dating can become a serious problem in the workplace because it’s bringing the personal life into a place of work.

When the situation gets to the point where the couple begins to make other coworkers uncomfortable, first attempt to talk to them in private and ask if they could tone it down while at work.

However, if they decide to ignore you and your co-workers’ pleas, go talk to your boss or manager about the situation and let them handle it accordingly.

Dear Shelby,

My girlfriend has a serious anxiety disorder and when she gets overstressed, I don’t how to help calm her down. I want to be a good boyfriend, so how can I help her out?

Dear concerned boyfriend,

I would recommend looking at http://www.adaa.org/finding-help/helping-others/spouse-or-partner.

This site gives some helpful advice on how to be a supportive partner to your girlfriend when she is dealing with anxiety.

The first step you should take in being a helpful partner is to learn about anxiety disorders so you can understand your partner better.

Also, never assume you know what your partner needs; ask how you can help.

Be a good listener so you have a proper understanding of what they need and the emotions they are going through.

Most importantly, understand that knowing when to be patient and when to push your partner can be challenging.

Having the proper balance will involve a lot of trial and errors.

Dear Shelby,

The school year is coming to an end, and I will be transferring to a different school than my boyfriend that I met here at HCC. Should I end the relationship or try to continue it even though we’re going to two different schools?

Dear Worried lover,

The choice will be yours in the end on what you feel that you can handle; long distant relationships are not for everyone.

If you choose to end the relationship because you don’t feel that you’re ready to handle a long distance relationship that is perfectly all right.

However, if you choose to stay with your current boyfriend, that is okay too.

It will be difficult, but if it makes you happy then go for it. In the end, do what makes you happy.

May 17, 2016 | Leave a Comment