Posts Tagged ‘The Women’s Corner’

‘Home Improvement” needed a remodel

Thursday, November 15th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Have you ever been to someone’s home and they only have the basic 30 channels? This becomes boring because you can either watch old shows or sit there and twiddle your thumbs. I just so happened to be in that situation and I tuned into the TV instead of being bored out of my mind. I flip through channel after channel but settle on “Home Improvement”.

My family used to watch that show all the time. I just remember it being one of those TV shows that made people laugh. But after rewatching it with an adult brain, I realized “Home Improvement” is actually extremely sexist.

Now don’t get me wrong, I love me some Tim Allen. He’s very funny and voices a beloved Disney character. However, that show is the voice of every manly man’s ego. If you’re not familiar with the show, it pretty much follows the life of Tim and his family. Tim is the stereotypical American male in that he’s very passionate about his tools, his handy work, and especially his ego. He is very adamant about showing off his manhood and taking care of everything a man should.

Every episode, and I mean every single one, Tim is doing things that belittle women, especially his wife. According to Complex Media, the first episode has Tim mocking his wife for wanting them to go the opera, dismisses her attempts to help him build a birdhouse, and claims that women shouldn’t be working on cars because men don’t work on washing machines.

What kind of humor is this?

You can definitely tell that the target audience for this show was middle aged white men who like to show that they are truly men. It’s actually atrocious and disgusting.

Each episode’s plot line is like a plea from every man saying, “I’m a man, you better believe it.” The male characters have to have a tool in their hand at least once a day and they have to make some comment about how they do man’s work while their wives are off taking care of the house and children.

This is not the olden days. This was only written in the 90’s. Women were oppressed in TV shows even just years ago. And of course, it’s still happening, but due to female activists, these kinds of shows are being put to a stop.

It’s insane to think that the humor of degrading women and putting men on a pedestal was seen as normal. And to think that I kind of grew up on that show disgusts me. But thanks to the changing world where women are charging towards equality, I know that this show is not worth my time, nor my laughs.

And to those who say it’s just comedy and that I just don’t understand the humor, you are proving my point exactly. If the world gives that sexist humor a platform, it will become a norm and be seen as acceptable.

But it’s not. Degrading females for being women is wrong in every way and it shouldn’t be made into a joke. A man can show of their manliness by doing what makes them happy, but in that process, they don’t need to put women down.

We can all live in a world where women can do the handy work and men can do the dishes and everyone’s ego can still be intact.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communications and Production.

The Women’s Corner: Their stories are being heard

Wednesday, October 31st, 2018

Tabitha Barr

For me, this edition of The Collegian is the most important one we will put out this year.

The topic of sexual assault is something that people hate talking about. Each story is somehow pushed under the rug because people want to avoid the topic. It makes people uncomfortable. But that is the exact reason why we are talking about it. The past two months have made the talk of sexual assault a major issue and I don’t want it to go away. I want the conversation to continue. This isn’t just some trending topic that disappears away in a week. This is a crucial subject that always needs to be talked about, and I hope this edition does exactly that.

I interviewed two women about their experiences with being sexually assaulted. Those interviews and those stories will stay with me forever. When I say that their struggles hit me, I mean it. These two women have gone through so much, and it kills me to hear them recount how someone took advantage of them. It makes me sick to even think about it.

The reason I think I’m connected to the stories is because I personally know these women. I’ve known both of them almost my whole life. I consider them my friends. And to hear what they had to endure, what they had to fight through, it sends my emotions into a whirl.

Hearing them say the details of their trauma sent two main emotions through my body. At first I become heartbroken. My heart hurts for them because I hate that they had to endure that pain. I just want to give them a hug and thank them for letting me have the honor of hearing their story. I am truly and utterly grateful.

But the second emotion that washed through me was pure anger. To the horrible human beings (if they can even be called that) who hurt these girls and put them through hell, I just want to throw a chair at them. It just makes me so mad that these men could be so selfish and horrible that they would hurt these two women without thinking twice. I’m getting so flustered that I can’t even write how angry I am.

These women have gone through so much but are overcoming it everyday. They are focusing on their futures and creating a life that they are proud to live. They seriously inspire me. I’m so proud to know these girls and I’m so happy that they have taken this horrendous situation, and made it their life goal to prove that it won’t stop them.

I hope that all of you readers read the stories and let them register. It’s a lot to take in and sometimes our own brains want to reject the messages, but don’t let it. Actually read and comprehend the stories, and understand their struggles. But then, take those stories and let them inspire you to keep going. Any person’s story that deals with sexual assault is important in every way.

Hear them, see them, feel them. These survivors are inspirations.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communications and Production

The Women’s Corner: Halloween is scary, but slut-shaming is even worse

Friday, October 19th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Halloween is one of the top rated holidays of the year in the United States. It’s a night full of excitement, scares and more. A night where anyone can dress up like anything they want, however they want.

But for women, it’s just another chance for us to get slut-shamed.

There is this tweet that I was sent recently from Collegian Social Media Editor, Emily Fehrman, that said, “‘You’re using Halloween as an excuse to dress like a slut.’ First of all, I don’t need an excuse.” When I read this, the first thing that came to my head was “EXACTLY!”

Halloween is a night where women can dress like whoever and whatever they want and they should be able to do that without judgment from others. If a girl wants to dress sexy or show a little more skin than normal, let her go for it. I love seeing girls show their confidence through Halloween costumes.

Just because a girl is dressing a certain way, does not give you the right to judge her. I grew up being taught that it’s not right to judge because it’s not my place. But now that I’m older, I realize how much the people around me judge by first look. I think judging a person is somehow ingrained in our brains no matter how hard we try to ignore it.

When it comes to the way a girl dresses, whether it be just a regular day, or the night of Halloween, I encourage you to let her live her life without slut-shaming her or her outfit. If she wants to flaunt what she has in a way that for some reason makes you “uncomfortable”, look away. But her body should not make you uncomfortable because it isn’t your concern. She is dressing how she wants to dress, and if she feels confident, that is all that should matter.

Halloween has no rules, nor should it have any. It is a holiday that promotes dressing the way you want and that should be honored and loved. So empower the women around you this Halloween and have fun knowing that you’re letting her be who she wants to be.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying media communications and production