Posts Tagged ‘Hutchinson Community College’

HutchCC Theatre ready for debut

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

By Rachel Lyons
Staff Writer

Beginning Oct. 18 Hutchinson Community College Theatre will perform Thornton Wilder’s classic play “Our Town”. Twelve actors and one style of performance come together to tell the story of Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire, and two families over a span of 12 years.

Each act discusses a different aspect of life, whether it be mundane every day life, a wedding, or a funeral.

Each act is portrayed using the pantomime style of acting, which resembles traditional miming with the use of little to no props or scenery.

Grover’s Corners is a typical small town. A good mixture of different types of people and gossip.

Lacy Johnson, Production Stage Manager and Joe/Si Crowell, were asked to describe “Our Town”

“Wholesome, (because) it’s old and cutesy, and for the entire family,” Johnson said.

Johnson’s favorite scene in the play is the drug store scene because “it’s cute as heck,” but more than anything, she says, “Please come see it, the arts are dying.”

HutchCC, Hutchinson High School Students, and local patrons may recognize actors Damien Page, Michael Cooprider, Roni Ratzloff, Dafne Oliva, Gee Davis, Alex Miller, Nick Hockett and Keely Schmidt from Pretty Praire theatre productions.

Others on the cast and crew include: Jayden Billinger, Newton; Lacy Johnson, Kansas City, Kansas; Luis Ramirez, Wichita; Gee Davis, Haven; and Rachel Lyons, Goessel. “Our Town” is directed by Deidre Ensz-Maddox, HutchCC Director of Theatre, who also appears on stage.

HutchCC’s production of “Our Town” will be Oct. 18-20, at 7:30 p.m., with doors opening at 7 p.m., each night in Stringer Fine Arts Center’s BJ Warner Recital Hall. Tickets are $10 for Adults, $8 for Seniors, high school and non-HuchCC $5, HutchCC students and staff free with ID.

For questions please call (620) 665-3503.

Roundup: Blue Dragon football hammers Fort Scott

Friday, September 21st, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The No. 12 Hutchinson Community College football team had its best performance Saturday afternoon against Fort Scott at Gowans Stadium, as the Blue Dragons won 61-21.

The Dragons rushed for more than 300 yards and had a total of six different players score.

Freshman quarterback Mason Schucker threw for a season-high four touchdown passes, completing half of his passes for 245 yards. The Blue Dragons were up at half 38-7.

Sophomore running back Dezmon Jackson had seven carries for a career-high 133 yards. Freshman Jonathan White rushed for 78 yards with 18 carries.  Drake Bolus then ran for 53 yards with one touchdown. Jaylin Erwin had three catches for 23 yards and two scores.  Cephas Smith had two catches for 61 yards.

Defensively, the Blue Dragons put the heat on Fort Scott. The Blue Dragons had three interceptions and four quarterback sacks.

Freshman defensive back Art Green had two interceptions being the second Blue Dragon with two interceptions in one game, becoming the second Blue Dragon with two interceptions in one game. Letayveon Beaton had the other interception, making this the third interception of the season for him.

Soccer – The women’s soccer team defeated Hesston College 4-1 Saturday at Hesston.

The Dragons are now 5-0-1 and 3-0-1 in conference standings.

Yet again, the Blue Dragons led early. Brailey Moeder scored this goal with an assist from Naomi Waithira. Waithira also scores with just less than 10 minutes in the first half. Hutch leads 2-0.

Starting the second half Ashely Venegas scores, making it 3-0. Followed by Hesston goal nine minutes later. Addi While bounces back with a goal making the score 4-1, Hutch wins.

HutchCC will travel to Pratt Saturday at 6 p.m.

Volleyball – The volleyball team improved to .500 Saturday against Garden City at the Sports Arena. Blue Dragons move to 5-5 overall and 4-2 in the Jayhawk Conference with the three-set sweep.

Set 1: HutchCC got an early lead 7-3 lead, but the Busters scored three-straight to make it a one-point game. Delilah Vigil came back with kill followed with a Vigil and Elena Takova stuff block, putting the Blue Dragons up 17-8.

Set 2: The Blue Dragons lead early 7-3. A Busters double block put them within three points of the Blue Dragons, but Hutch then went off with a 13-1 run. Eden Hiebert started the run with back-to-back kills. Chole Partridge the scored nine points on a service run. Takova ended set with a kill for a 25-8 win.

Set 3: Hutch started off with a 9-5 lead. Garden City came back with three-straight kills. Hiebert followed with a kill and ace serve. Partridge followed with a kill, making it 21-15. Takova also ended this set with a kill. Dragons win 25-19.

Men’s cross country – The men’s cross country team made Blue Dragon some recent history at Missouri Southern State on Saturday. The Blue Dragons won the Missouri Southern State University Stampede team title on Saturday, with 41 points. This has not happened 2000.

HutchCC had four runners place in the Top 10 on Saturday.

Freshman Andrew Kibet won his second race of the season with a time of 24 minutes, 42.6 seconds, dominating the meet. Kibet won the race by 1 minute and 23.05 seconds.

Freshman Sylvestre Kiraber placed sixth for the Blue Dragons with a time of 26:15.3. Freshman Brett Hillabrand placed eighth with a time of 26:42.8. Sophomore Jared Stark placed 10th with a time of 26:43.6. Sophomore Conner Kaufmann placed 17th with a time of 27:22.3.

Women’s cross country team – The women left everything on the line Saturday at the Missouri Southern State University Stampede.

Lisayo Ewoi lead the way for the Dragons, and won the MSSU Stampede. Not only did Ewoi win, but she also shattered Blue Dragon women’s cross country record, with a time of 18 minutes, 29.1. Only two women in the Blue Dragon history have broken the 19-minute plateau.

HutchCC placed fourth out of 20 teams Saturday. Cowley placed first with 61 points, with Southwestern placing second behind them with 76 points. The Blue Dragons and Friends tied for fourth with 104 points and Allen finished fifth with 179 points.

Sophomore Aileen Gomez finished 19th overall with a time of 19:46.0. Sophomore Sarah Patteson a 21st-place time of 19:46.0. Freshman Gabby Collins ran a time of 19:49.0, placing 24th.

 

The next time the Blue Dragons will run will be at Emporia State Invitational.

 

The importance of 9/11 to new generations

Friday, September 21st, 2018

Rachel Lyons, Collegian columnist

“Today, our fellow citizens, our way of life, our very freedom came under

attack in a series of deliberate and deadly terrorist acts… But they have failed. Our country is

strong.” – President George W. Bush, Sept. 11, 2001.

Those words, spoken by President Bush to a nation in despair and distress after Osama bin Laden’s attack on New York World Trade Center, The Pentagon and in Pennsylvania, brought about immense acts of kindness between Americans.

The day following the attacks, many will recount that it appeared race, gender and ethnicity didn’t matter, yet there is a good portion of the American population who either barely remember 9/11 or hadn’t been born yet. The Class of 2020 is the first graduating class that was not alive for the events of 9/11.

Besides being one of the first major events to receive mainstream press attention, not everything has to be ‘just another event in history’. Americans rallied together to save those who became trapped in the burning towers, and ultimately lost their lives in the effort. More effort has been put into preserving the memory of the day, including the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, countless documentaries and innumerable moments of silences.

The reason that we shouldn’t stop teaching about 9/11 is the influence it had on America’s daily life. 9/11 changed airport security measures, it changed the perception Americans had on citizens of other countries, especially those from the Middle East. 9/11 isn’t just a memorable day, it’s a turning point in American history. It marked the end of the America that people had come to love, an end to America’s naivety.

That’s why we keep teaching 9/11 as an important event, to show the impact, preserve the memory of those who died because of another person’s hate, and to remember that there was a time in history when we put aside our differences to mourn after a tragedy.

Are 8 a.m. classes too early?

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

Justin Harris tries to stay in a group discussion during his 8 a.m. class, but he’s not a fan of the early start time.

By Brenna Eller
Editor-In-Chief

Early classes aren’t uncommon at Hutchinson Community College. Many students have had, or will possibly attend, an 8 a.m. class at some point if they haven’t already. Some may be dreading it, while others are used to waking up early.

Some colleges have already made it so that classes start later in the morning because the instructors worry about their students not making it to their class and were concerned with the lack of sleep they were getting.

Colleges that disagree with that idea believe early classes help students with time management and prepare them for future careers where they will have to get up early in the morning.

Simon Gadberry, a HutchCC freshman from Little River, described how he felt towards 8 a.m. classes.

“I like the class,” Gadberry said. “It’s a little early, but if you take something easy, that class gets you ready to take on the day.”

It is sometimes assumed that students who would rather have a later class instead of an 8 a.m. tend to slack off a bit more at their first class of the day and pay less attention.

Gadberry agrees to this statement saying, “Yeah they do, you can tell there is always that one person that walks in late and doesn’t put any effort into their work.”

However, there are also students who believe 8 a.m. classes are too early and shouldn’t be allowed due to being involved in sports and other activities on campus.

HutchCC student/athlete, Justin Harris, a sophomore from Louisiana, plays football for the Blue Dragons and admits that it is challenging waking up for his 8 a.m. class.

Harris said that this is his first 8 a.m. in college after transferring from Baylor, so he said  that he has a tough time staying awake in the class, even if he enjoys the material being taught.

When describing his feelings toward 8 a.m. classes, Harris said, “Words can’t even explain, they just suck.”

Consequently, Harris doesn’t think he performs as well as he would’ve if the class was later in the day.

“If I had to choose a good time to start class, my ideal time would be 10 a.m.,” Harris said.

Q&A: Catching up with Badinage

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

Neal Allsup

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

Hutchinson Community Colleges jazz group Badinage is a group of students lead by director Neal Allsup, the director of choral activities at HutchCC. After sitting down with him and a couple students to see what the Badinage is all about here’s what was found.

Neal Allsup

EF: How long have you been a jazz instructor?

NA: This is my 31st year.

EF: What kind of awards?

NA: The Downbeat Award is the biggest one yet. We have some pretty impressive credentials. Opened for Tyranny Sutton, for a lot of Grammy winners, like New York Voices, Manhattan Transfer, Take Six.

EF: What do they go through at these festivals?

NA: It’s like a mega classroom. I require them to go to workshops and classes. Getting instruction from professionals, Grammy winners and Grammy nominees. You could never have that type of intensity in a classroom. It gives confirmation that what they’re doing is awesome and at an extremely high level.

EF: What is the largest place you have performed?

NA: Carnegie Hall seven times, or maybe eight, I can’t remember anymore. Eight State of Kansas Music Conventions. These are things you have to submit audition tapes to. We have submitted stuff to the Jazz Entertainment Network conference, JEN.

EF: What kind of performances do you guys have this school year?

NA: Three or four each semester just here in Hutchinson alone. We’re singing with the Hutch Symphony in December. There’s no telling how many performances we’ll have because we get invitations all the time. However, we have too many limitations to do all of them. Limitations like travel funds and time.

EF: How hard is it to do this?

NA: This is the most challenging music; as a singing musician they will perform in their lives. Most of our “heroes” on the radio could never sing this stuff. Doesn’t mean that it’s better, it just means that stuff is basic, and this certainly isn’t. I believe that every music, no matter what, it’s about where it is serves it purpose to express what it means to be human.

EF: If you could say anything to those out there thinking about joining the group, what would it be?

NA: It would be a wonderful challenge. They aren’t going to have muscles that are sore, but it works their brain. It will work their character. Expect that, if you don’t dig that? It probably will be a chore to you. If you really dig a challenge and you’re not a quitter, that you have substance within you that says “I will persevere” then that’s a place for you.

Sara Schlicklau, Pretty Prairie Sophomore

EF: How long have you been in it?

SS: This sophomore year.

EF: How long have you been singing?

SS: Since I was little bitty, first time I remember performing was in 4th grade.

EF: How did you join?

SS: Emailed Neal for about a year, saw the group perform and decided I had to be apart of the group.

EF: How would you get the word out you guys exist?

SS: Have more of a social media presence.

Bailey Graber, Pretty Prairie Sophomore

EF: How long have you been in it?

SS: This is my second year.

EF: How long have you been singing?

SS: I’ve been singing for as long as I can remember. I grew up singing with my parents in church and fell in love with it.

EF: How did you join?

SS: I first heard about the jazz groups because my older brother was a part of it. I knew it was something I wanted to do after hearing them the first time. I contacted Neal and set up a time to meet with him and have an audition of sorts.

EF: How would you get the word out you guys exist?

SS: We try to hang up posters around school and places in Hutch to get the word out. It’s sad how many people, on campus even, haven’t heard of us, especially considering all the accomplishments these jazz groups have made through the years.

EF: How many times a week do you guys meet? How long?

SS: We meet Tuesdays and Thursdays for an hour and a half, which really isn’t a ton of time together, so we do a lot of practicing on our own outside of class time.

EF: How many performances this year?

SS: We have a few concerts that we do in the BJ Warner performance hall which are free to students if they bring their ID.   We’d love to have people come to these, and the others around the community!

EF: What do you need to do to join Badinage?

SS: To be in a jazz group, you have to first be in choir. There are choir scholarships available and so if you are in jazz you may just get a bit more money in your choir scholarship, and that counts for jazz. It’s just not separate. If there is anyone out who is interested, don’t hesitate to pursue it. It’s been an amazing experience and I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

High school vs. college security

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

In today’s climate, it is nearly impossible to enter a high school without following the proper protocols. The doors remain locked, visitors must sign in and anything suspicious is immediately reported.

After experiencing these levels of security, students may be shocked by how open Hutchinson Community College seems to be. With the current rise of active shootes, students need to stay aware of safety protocols on campus. How do they compare with high school protocols?

Katherine Sheldon, a freshman from Hutchinson, had this to say about her high school security. “I mean, we would lock doors, and only have one entrance where you could actually get in. We didn’t really have any security guards, we just had the local police.”

The school would have drills every so often where the doors would be locked, lights turned off, and all the students would hide so they were not visible through the window on the door.

When asked about the comparison between HutchCC and her high school, she began to notice some possible issues.

“I mean, the doors aren’t locked, like, at all,” Sheldon said. “It’s easier to get into buildings and the teachers haven’t told us safety protocols for a situation like that.”

She said she assumes that students would follow the same protocols at a high school – lock the doors and hide. She doesn’t know for sure though, and that has her worried. She had a few ideas that she believes would make the campus safer.

“I mean, I don’t know if they have video cameras or anything like that in the hallways, but that would help,” Sheldon said. “Maybe make it more difficult for people to get into the buildings.”

Steve Dunmire, Lead Security Officer, shared some of his knowledge on the protocols here, as well as possible security measures that could be added.

“It can get sort of complicated since the students are adults and we can’t force a decision on how to act,” Dunmire said, describing the difficulties of an active shooter situation.

He has the ability to send alerts over the phone, but that can take a few minutes to reach everyone. According to him, the best way to respond is the “run, hide, or fight” response.

If you can escape campus, do so quickly. If not, find a room to hide in and barricade the door. You can kick out a window if the room has one and escape through it. As a last resort, improvise a weapon and fight your way out of the situation.

“Chairs and tables can make good makeshift weapons. Women’s purses can actually be a good source for improvised weapons. They are usually filled with all sorts of sharp objects,” Dunmire said.

Dunmire has his own ideas on how the campus could be made safer for situations like this.

“I’ve talked about having a campus police department, as well as adding more security cameras,” Dunmire said. “However, it all comes down to money.”

There is still a suggested safety protocol to follow in an active shooter situation, and all the information can be found on DragonZone.

“Of course, if they pick up a paper and read this article, that would definitely help,” Dunmire said.

Sports roundup: Last Chance Who? HutchCC beats Independence

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College football team managed another win Saturday night, against a top-five, nationally-ranked team, as the Blue Dragons won at Independence Community College, 37-27.

This was the first time in 23 years that HutchCC has accomplished beating a top-five nationally ranked team. This puts the Blue Dragons at 2-0 in the Jayhawk Conference.

The Blue Dragons dominated the first half. Tied 7-7, the Dragons went on to score 30-unanswered points.

Starting the third quarter, Independence slowly started to take over. Independence outscored the Blue Dragons 20-0 in the second half.

Jaylen Erwin and Khalil McClain both had two touchdowns, while Dezmon Jackson had one. Defensively, Monty Montgomery and Josh Reliford both had interceptions.

The Blue Dragons next game is Saturday, against Iowa Western Community College at Gowans Stadium.

Men’s cross country – The men’s cross country team made some Blue Dragon history on Friday. The Blue Dragons won their first team championship since 2016.

Andrew Kibe lead the way for the Blue Dragons winning the 2018 season-opening Terry Masterson Twilight Classic, with a time of 19 minutes, 32.7 seconds.

Hutch then took over having four Blue Dragons place seventh through 10th. Sophomore Connor Kaufman was seventh in a time of 21:13.19. Freshman Brett Hillabrand was eighth in 21:39.83. Sophomore Kade Gerlach was ninth in 21:47.99 and sophomore Jared Stark was 10th in 21:50.81.

Hutchinson lead the way scoring 29 team points. Runner-up Cloud County had 38 points, followed by Dodge City with 81, Pratt with 114 and McPherson College with 115.

Women’s cross country – The women also had six runners finish in the top 10 Friday, allowing them to win the Terry Masterson Twilight Classic.

The Blue Dragons also had the lowest team score last Friday, with a team score of 25 points. Dodge City, followed with 57 points, with Pratt behind them with 62 points and McPherson College was fourth with 91 points.

Hutchinson freshman Lisayo Ewoi pulled away in the last couple yards, finishing with a time of 18:32.8. In fourth place was sophomore Aileen Gomez with a time of 19:49.4, and behind her was Freshman Gabby Collins placing fifth with a time of 19:55.5. Then sophomore Sarah Patteson placed sixth 19:58.6. Sophomore America Garcia finished eighth with a time of 20:20.0. Sophomore Macy Linenberger was 13th with a time of 20:49.2. Sophomore Ashton Schlickau was 17th with a time of 21:32.0. Caitlin Schlickau was 18th with a time of 21:38.0. Carissa Youngs finished 27th with a time of 23:02.

Soccer – The women’s soccer team managed to smash North Iowa, 11-0, on Saturday at Salthawk Sports Complex. The first four goals were scored within the first eight minutes of the game.

Sophomore Brailey Moeder started off the game with a goal, assist from the goalkeeper, Yadira Delgado. After a goal from sophomore Megan Maslak, Moeder followed with a second goal. Then, freshman Addi White scored the third goal, first goal of the season for her.

 

The Blue Dragons are now 2-0, moving on to the next game Wednesday against Northwest Kansas Technical College, at Goodland

Volleyball – The volleyball team started in a struggle to get into its groove in the first two sets against Pratt. The Blue Dragons rebounded and finished with a three-set sweep, as they improved to 3-3 and 2-0 in the Jayhawk West.

Here’s a recap of the three sets.

Set 1 – The Blue Dragons started the first set with a lead of 4-2. Pratt pulled it to 11-10 until Sophomore Lexi Hogan had a kill, allowing the Dragons to bounce back. They won the set 25-23.

Set 2 – Lauren Wilson helped the Blue Dragons to another set victory, coming off the bench with a kill. Later, Wilson had another kill, which gave Hutch a 23-20 lead. Hutch then missed three set points, but yet again Wilson had a kill. The Blue Dragons won 28-26.

Set 3 – The Blue Dragons finally got in a groove with back-to-back blocks from Hydeah Hinesman and Eden Hiebert. Hutch won 25-12.

Retiring EMS advisor reflects on teaching career

Monday, May 7th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Online Editor

Dan Jones is a Hutchinson Community College Emergency Medical Service advisor and has been helping out students and helping them make their dreams come true.
Jones has worked at the college for more than 20 years, teaching even as he continued to work in hospitals and with patients.
“I was ready for a change in that point in my life, and so I become a clinical coordinator, and so I would go around Wichita, Salina and Hutch and take students to their clinical settings in the hospital, because that was my area of expertise,” Jones said. “Then I got interested in the classroom, I got my instructor license, in the state to teach in. I got that in 1986, and so I kind of liked going in the classroom, and that was around 2000.
Jones said he worked in the Emergency Medical Technician field, and EMS was the embodiment of medical.
“Doing it on the wing and a prayer, and you don’t have the doctors and the people in the field to help you, and I thought it was interesting,” Jones said. “EMS is more of a specialty area, a jack-of-all-trades. They were the specialty in the crisis situation, so I was always thought that was interesting within EMS.
Jones said he had a lot of students through the years, and he had to change his approach on how kids learned. He said it was a challenge at times, that’s one reason why he wanted to retire.
“It’s getting harder, all the changes, one thing in especially in EMS and medicine and education is that there’s change, and it’s getting a bit harder on the change. I still go with the flow, but it’s been an interesting 23 years at the college. I’ve had different roles, but my favorite would be the classroom.”
Not to say the classroom was easy, but Jones said it was rewarding.
“I’ve had kids with challenges, and they overcome the challenges to get through, and you knew that they wouldn’t be a paramedic. They knew their spot, and would be a good EMT. With specific ones – there have been too many to pick out – but I had one and you could tell she was smart, and it went in the classroom socially inept, and through the class, she really came a long way, and I’ve helped her along the way with that. She’s a paramedic now, and there was a time where I thought I don’t know if she was going to make it or not. But if it’s something I learned, it’s not to give up too early.”

Baseball keeps up offensive tear; softball finishes regular season with easy sweep

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

By Lucas Barlow
Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College baseball team won its ninth-straight game, after the Blue Dragons easily handled Pratt Community College in two games last Sunday.

The Blue Dragons outscored the Beavers 38-12, as they won 18-8 in game one, and 20-4 in game two. That’s also Hutchinson’s 18th-straight win over Pratt, dating back to the 2014 season.

Freshman Dylan Nedved tied two Blue Dragon single-game records that day. He tied the school record for total bases in a single game with 12. Nedved also scored four runs in game two, which ties the single-game school record.

Sophomore Julian Rip also had himself a day, as he cranked three doubles in game one. That also ties a Blue Dragon single-game record.

This is now the fifth-straight season that the Blue Dragons have reached 30 wins, and is the 25th time in program history.

Hutchinson is now 31-17 overall and 17-11 in the Jayhawk West conference. The Blue Dragons are only one game behind Butler Community College for second place.

Softball – The Blue Dragons sophomores finished the regular season in style, pounding the Bethany junior varsity 21-0 and 14-0 on Tuesday at Fun Valley Sports Complex.

Sophomore Raven Bass belted three home runs in the first game, as HutchCC set a single-game record with seven home runs.

The Blue Dragons smashed three more home runs in the second game, with Natalie Semmel smacked two more home runs, including a grand slam.

The sophomore class have won 71 percent of their games so far, going into this weekend’s Region 6 first-round best-of-three series against Hesston at Fun Valley. They also combined for a 3.54 GPA.

Morgensen has been driving force

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

This is “The Bus”, Bobby Morgensen.

This is a bus.

By Lucas Barlow
Sports Editor

During his first year at Hutchinson Community College, Bobby Morgensen quickly became one of the best baseball players in the conference.

He helped the Blue Dragons get deep into the Region 6 Tournament, until they lost to Neosho County Community College in the semifinals.

He had a great season. But Morgensen did have one mistake that landed him his lasting nickname, “The Bus.”

“Last year, we had a road series at Seward and I accidently missed the bus early in the

morning,” Morgensen said. “I ended up having to drive and catch the bus. Fortunately, I was

allowed to get on. I did get a one-game suspension, but all was forgiven after that.”

As the school year comes to a close at HutchCC, so does the baseball season. But before that, the Blue Dragons have postseason play.

This year’s Blue Dragon squad is once again a top team in the conference as they currently sit third. They’ve also compiled a 32-17 overall record going to the weekend four-game series against Seward County.

With the Region 6 Tournament starting next week, Hutchinson will not only be playing for a

regional championship, but also for a chance to secure a spot in the NJCAA World Series.

With the addition of some solid freshmen this year, the Blue Dragons look dangerous heading into the competition, but experience is a big part of playing well in tournament games, and that’s where Morgensen comes in.

Morgensen grew up in Omaha, Nebraska, where he graduated from Creighton Prep High School in 2016. He committed to Hutchinson to play baseball because he loved the coaching staff, and Hobart-Detter Field was “just beautiful.”

After his outstanding first year, Morgensen was named Jayhawk West freshman of the year, along with All-Region 6 first team. This year is no different, as he is once again playing at a high level. Morgensen currently has the second most runs (56), second most home runs (9), third most RBIs (44) and third most hits (57) on the team. He leads all other sophomores in those categories.

With the most important part of the season on the near horizon, “The Bus” is tuned-up, locked in and ready to go.

“My only goals for the rest of the year are to win Region VI and to advance to NJCAA

World Series in Colorado,” Morgensen said.

If the Blue Dragons can accomplish this feat, it would be the third time in program history,

and the first since 2010.

The talented left fielder has also committed to Florida Atlantic University to further his baseball career. There he can continue to grow and improve himself as a player, because he has potential to be playing the sport he loves for a long time.