Posts Tagged ‘HutchCC’

SkillsUSA helping students for their future

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

By Tabitha Barr
Opinion Page Editor

Skills USA is an organization that started in 1965 to help students better prepare them for their future jobs.

Hutchinson Community college partners with Business and Industry to further the options students can pick from. Through meetings, meeting new people, and competitions, students can gain knowledge and learn what they want to do in their future.

There are more than 100 areas that students can compete in, giving a chance to any student who wants to participate. Their goal is to grant students the opportunity of new knowledge to become “world-class workers, leaders and responsible American Citizens.”

Students who join will get hands-on experience in an area they want to pursue. There are meetings with the whole team, or just a one-on-one meetings with John Pendergrass, who is the sponsor for Hutchinson Community College. These meetings consist giving the students their plan for the year to get them ready for the competition.

This school year’s competition is in April at surrounding Hutchinson areas, mainly the college campus.

During this, students will compete in what area they have chosen, whether that be culinary arts, welding and more. At competition, competitors show up, are given a name tag, locate the designated area based on what the competitor came prepared for, then take a written test to see what they know.

Afterwards, the student will then have to prove they know the material and can do it as well in hands on work.

“It’s not just a written test that you walk away from, you do the written test, and then you go out . . . and perform the task,” Pendergrass said.

The main reason this is important is because at these competitions, a student is most likely being judged by those who can hire them.

These people oversee students who are working hard and proving they can learn and become well knowledgeable in a field they would like to pursue. This is not only just a competition, but a chance to find a job.

If any student would like to join, the team is still open for recruits.

“It’s an ongoing thing,” Pendergrass said.

A student does not have to attend every meeting, but they do need to be a member. These meetings are good for information purposes.

Elections for positions will be held in the next coming months for students who want coordinate and help out the team. The membership does cost a one-time $7 payment before December.

Any student can join the Skills USA team, and it is not limited to certain majors. If a student has the drive to learn more about a specific field, they can do so through this club.

If a student would like to join, contact John Pendergrass to to become a Skills USA team member at pendergrassj@hutchcc.edu or (620)694-2443.

Record-breaking kicker

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

Sebastian Garcia, from Greer, South Carolina, is now the record holder for longest field goal in Hutchinson Community College football history.

Garcia set the school record with a 48-yard field goal in the third quarter against Fort Scott, Saturday, September 15 at Gowans Stadium during a Blue Dragon win, 61-21.

Garcia’s kicking and football career was only started after a talk with his dad. Garcia’s first interest was soccer, until her talked with is dad, expressing his football interest. Garcia decided to try spring football his freshman year at Wade Hampton High School.

“I decided to try kicking and punting because I had a good leg in soccer and figured it could transfer over to football,” Garcia said.

Garcia developed into an outstanding kicker and punter throughout his high school career, thanks to the help of his high school kicking coach Jim Hendricks, a University of Florida alumnus. Not only did his high school coach greatly influence Garcia, but so did some of the camps he participated in, Ray Guy and Chrissallor Kicking being a few.

Garcia not only holds the the record for longest field goal in Blue Dragon history, but he also holds the record for longest field goal in Wade Hampton history. Garcia set a 52-yarder field goal while at Wade Hampton, to go with his 48-yard field goal at Hutchison Community College.

Garcia broke the record held by three Blue Dragon kickers. It was last tied in 2013 by Ryan Weese, when he made a 47-yarder at Butler.

Garcia remained cool and collected when attempting a record breaking field goal.

“I just went back to basics of kicking and struck the ball,” Garcia said.

Hutchinson coach Rion Rhoades recognizes what an outstanding individual and player Garcia is, on and off the field.

“Sebastian is not just a really good kicker, he’s a really good guy,” Rhoades said. “He is fun to be around. There is not a player on the field that cares more about their job than Sebastian, almost to a fault. Sometimes he works too hard.”

Garcia not has only set the field goal record in high school and now in college, but he was also named the NJCAA Special Teams Player of the Week.

Longest field goals in HutchCC history

Sebastian Garcia, 48 yards, 2018

Kevin Coleman, 47 yards, 2004

Michael Mesh, 47 yards, 2012

Ryan Weese, 47 yards, 2013

Next Friday (and every Friday) is Hawaiian shirt day.

Friday, September 28th, 2018

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

For those who are unaware, for the last four weeks, there has been a few students at Hutchinson Community College that partake in coordinating outfits.

Every Friday, a handful of Dan Smith’s engineering physics students collectively wear Hawaiian shirts.

What a way to make classes interesting.

Wyatt Krehbiel, Pretty Prairie sophomore, explained how this movement originally came about.

Krehbiel said that it had originally started off as a joke, but that it just escalated quickly. Soon the students had even got Smith to join in on the fun. He then goes on to explain why they wear them:

“A – Hawaiian shirts are awesome. B – We gotta start celebrating the weekend early,” he said.

As the weeks go by, they try to tell random people they meet around campus that every Friday is “Hawaiian Shirt Friday”, and that they need to partake. Krehbiel also jokes that it happens to be his “charismatic nature” that helps get more people to join.

One has to ask, does this have anything to do with Bill Lumbergh and the movie “Office Space”? Or just something they came up with on a whim?

Krehbiel said that he gets asked that a lot, but he has never even seen the movie.

They plan to continue wearing the shirts for the remainder of the first semester and possibly into the second.

When asked how he would feel if more people around campus started wearing Hawaiian shirts, Krehbiel said, “It would be absolutely awesome. I would love to be able to unite an entire college in the most ridiculous way possible.”

So dig out that old typical Hawaiian tourist shirt from high school spirit week, and dust that bad boy off before this next Friday so you too can enjoy the ridiculous fun these guys have.

Sleep-deprived studentzzzz

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

The lack of sleep affects not only educational success, but physical safety as well. Without the right amount of rest, people are at risk of multiple health issues. Exhaustion can even lead to dangerous situations if not dealt with proactively.

Many students are quickly nearing a downhill slide toward poor health and physical harm. It’s time for them to take an active role in their own sleep habits.

Students don’t always make the best decisions when it comes to their sleep habits. Late night studying, among other things, is one of the biggest factors in these habits. Some students don’t even get to bed until early morning.

Jon Reed, a HutchCC freshman from Hutchinson, says he usually doesn’t get to bed until 2 a.m., and wakes up around 6 a.m. That’s only four hours of sleep.

“I feel like s— when I wake up. Usually have to drink enormous amounts of coffee to get through the day,” Reed said.

Bralen Martin, a Hutchinson sophomore, follows a somewhat similar routine. Usually he’s in bed around 3 a.m. in the morning and up by 9 a.m.

While that’s a bit better, six hours is still not nearly enough to function properly throughout the day. Does he really feel like he is getting enough sleep?

“Sort of. I feel tired in the mornings, but usually wake up as the day goes by,” Martin said.

While “sort of” is better than not, it still goes to show that students aren’t getting enough rest. This can lead to some pretty scary incidents.

“One time I almost fell asleep while driving,” Reed said. “I started to swerve, but caught myself just in time.”

Falling asleep at the wheel is a serious problem, not just for the driver, but for anyone else on the road.

Sleep deprivation can cause lasting health issues as well, both mentally and physically.

Students who get less than seven hours of sleep are more susceptible to anxiety and depression. They are also at risk of weight gain or weight loss, increased blood pressure, and extreme irritability

Lasting effects include hypertension, diabetes and heart problems.

Students should work on prioritizing work and play, as well as designating a specific sleep schedule to keep them on track. It only takes a few weeks to set an internal clock.

Sleep is a necessity for everyone, especially young students. Sleep deprivation won’t just affect grades, but cause lasting health concerns.

Marvelous Moeder: Hutch native one of conference’s top goal scorers

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Brailey Moeder scores on a penalty kick against Barton.

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

Hutchinson Community College soccer player Brailey Moeder is not your average player.

She was a former Hutchinson High School standout and came to play soccer at HutchCC under coach Sammy Lane. Moeder was not always a standout soccer player, though. Throughout high school, Moeder worked hard and showed her coaches what a talented player she is. Now, as a sophomore forward for HutchCC, Moeder is one of the top forwards and goal scorers in the Jayhawk West Conference.

As Moeder’s sophomore year of college rolled around, she continued to standout. Out of the first six games the women’s soccer team has played this season, Brailey started in five of them. In those six games, she scored six goals, with two of them being a game winning goal. She has six assists and made one penalty kick, tying the game against Barton in a thrilling 3-3 tie.

Moeder has been a key player in the soccer’s team success this season and Lane has noticed.

“Brailey has stepped up for us,” Lane said, “I admire that.”

There is one game, in particular, where Moeder has stepped up the most. When the Blue Dragons played Barton Community College in early September, Brailey had a standout game.  Late in the game, with the soccer team trailing 3-2, the Blue Dragons were awarded a penalty kick, and Moeder was the brave soul who decided to take the shot.

Moeder ended up scoring the goal, tying the game against Barton.

“It gave me chills, to be honest. It was a lot of pressure and it was amazing,” Moeder said.

Throughout the years, Moeder has improved tremendously as a soccer player, but not without a little hard work. For Moeder, it was nice to finally see that hard work pay off saying, “There’s always room for improvement. I’m not just going to settle for what I thought was a good goal. That’s not me, I want to be better than that.”

Moeder has worked hard throughout the years to become the soccer player she is today. The results are something that Brailey is pleased with and hopes to see more of in the future.

Student/Instructor communication (Why can’t we be friends)

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Collegian Editor-In-Chief

As Hutchinson Community College is a junior college, the students and instructors have more one-on-one interaction than that of a four-year school, where the professor might not even know the names of his or her students.

That being said, broader communication is often expected of a teacher from the students.

Also, just getting out of high school, where teachers cared whether or not you pass because it is a reflection on them as a teacher, versus coming here to find out that being an adult, the instructors aren’t there to make sure you do everything right and get homework in on time. That is mainly up to the students and their responsibility to balance their lives accordingly to their academics.

Some students believe that instructors communicate a fair amount, while others view the communication is lacking.

HutchCC freshman Autumn Frickey, Lindsborg, gave her views on teacher-student communication.

“Honestly, the instructors I’ve had don’t communicate as I thought they would, and it’s just easier to ask friends or people in class for help,” Frickey said.

Frickey makes the argument that instructors should check their email more often and that checking emails is the overall issue for articulation with instructors.

When asked what her preferred method of communication, Frickey said, “I would talk to my teachers face-to-face, but normally they have to rush to their next class to get ready, so email is better.”

Since communication is generally a two-way deal, and not all of the responsibility is on the instructor, Frickey said, “Some students should ask questions earlier, but I feel as if it is both the student and the teacher’s fault. However, the school isn’t that big and I feel like they should be more one-on-one with the students.”

Sociology instructor Kim Newberry, who has worked at the college for more than a decade, shared her thoughts on communication between her students, and agrees that it is lacking not only between students, but everywhere.

“I have students that will email a question when they are sitting in my class and could ask right then,” Newberry said.

Sometimes classes can fluctuate when it comes to being social and in Newberry’s case, she recognizes that one class of hers is very quiet where no one hardly talks while other classes seem to carry conversations just fine.

Newberry said the reason for the inadequacy which she believes is that students would rather be on their phones or listening to music.

The most appropriate form of communication to Newberry would be to speak to one another in person. “Email is great for quick communication, but face-to-face is always bet for anything serious,” Newberry said.

When asked how this issue could be resolved, Newberry said, “If a student has an issue, he or she needs to learn how to communicate, most of us only want our students to succeed, and we cannot help if we do not know that there is a problem.”

Also when it comes to discussion between students and instructors, Newberry said that seeing each other in person should be the norm for all relationships.

“So many nuances of communication can be lost in an email or a text,” Newberry said.

Amber Brawner, coordinator/instructor of the visual media design program who has been at HutchCC for about 12 and a half years, shared her expectations of communication from her students lately.

“Communication is definitely a two-way street,” Brawner said. “It’s frustrating when students just walk out of the class without saying a word because oftentimes they miss material that is on a test or instructions for an assignment, and then wonder why they get the grade that they got.”

She also said that it is irritating when that same student doesn’t talk to her about their grade and how to get extra credit.

Are 8 a.m. classes too early?

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

Justin Harris tries to stay in a group discussion during his 8 a.m. class, but he’s not a fan of the early start time.

By Brenna Eller
Editor-In-Chief

Early classes aren’t uncommon at Hutchinson Community College. Many students have had, or will possibly attend, an 8 a.m. class at some point if they haven’t already. Some may be dreading it, while others are used to waking up early.

Some colleges have already made it so that classes start later in the morning because the instructors worry about their students not making it to their class and were concerned with the lack of sleep they were getting.

Colleges that disagree with that idea believe early classes help students with time management and prepare them for future careers where they will have to get up early in the morning.

Simon Gadberry, a HutchCC freshman from Little River, described how he felt towards 8 a.m. classes.

“I like the class,” Gadberry said. “It’s a little early, but if you take something easy, that class gets you ready to take on the day.”

It is sometimes assumed that students who would rather have a later class instead of an 8 a.m. tend to slack off a bit more at their first class of the day and pay less attention.

Gadberry agrees to this statement saying, “Yeah they do, you can tell there is always that one person that walks in late and doesn’t put any effort into their work.”

However, there are also students who believe 8 a.m. classes are too early and shouldn’t be allowed due to being involved in sports and other activities on campus.

HutchCC student/athlete, Justin Harris, a sophomore from Louisiana, plays football for the Blue Dragons and admits that it is challenging waking up for his 8 a.m. class.

Harris said that this is his first 8 a.m. in college after transferring from Baylor, so he said  that he has a tough time staying awake in the class, even if he enjoys the material being taught.

When describing his feelings toward 8 a.m. classes, Harris said, “Words can’t even explain, they just suck.”

Consequently, Harris doesn’t think he performs as well as he would’ve if the class was later in the day.

“If I had to choose a good time to start class, my ideal time would be 10 a.m.,” Harris said.

Athlete of the week: Brailey Moeder

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

(Sept. 2-8)

The week: Moeder had two goals and two assists in two games, with one of those goals coming in the dying minutes against Barton. Moeder’s late penalty kick against Barton helped salvage a thrilling 3-3 tie. She also scored in a 7-0 win against Northwest Kansas Tech.

The season: Moeder, a former Hutchinson High School standout, has five goals and six assists in five games for the Blue Dragons. She has two game-winning goals and the tying goal vs. Barton.

New Hiebert in town

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

It was only last year when Page Hiebert was at Hutchinson Community College, playing volleyball under head coach Patrick Hall. Now, kid sister Eden Hiebert is at HutchCC, also playing volleyball for the Blue Dragons.

Growing up, the Hiebert girls often played on the same team under the same coaches, edging on their competitiveness on the court and against each other.

Although Eden was following in her sister’s footsteps, she had her own worries.

“One of my main concerns coming here was being compared to her as a player,” Eden said when asked about coming to HutchCC.

Eden and Hall discussed the situation before Eden even decided where she would play college volleyball.

“Coach Hall and I made a deal before I committed to play here, that he wouldn’t compare the two of us,” Eden Hiebert said. “He has kept his word, and I appreciate that so much.”

Coach has managed to keep Page’s name out of practice, focusing on the athlete he currently has on the court.

Eden has also felt the pressure of living up to her sister’s success. Page was just the 11th HutchCC volleyball All American in history, and seventh American-born All American.

So far, Eden is starting to make a name for herself. In seven matches played, Eden leads the Blue Dragons with 57 kills. She also has 41 digs and 10 blocks.

Eden also faced the challenge of moving from a small-town school, to HutchCC. Coming from Goessel High School, Eden was worried about the challenges she would face during the game. Moving from high school volleyball to college volleyball presented a change. Not only would the pace of the game change, but the hits would get harder and serves would get more challenging.

Growing up with an older sister close in age has not always been easy, but Eden has learned that there are worse things in life than being compared to an older sister.

“Page is an amazing athlete, and I think that I have actually benefited from being so close in age,” Eden said. “She is one of my biggest role models and I love her to death.”

There is not much stronger than a sister’s bond.

Activities plentiful for students on campus

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

College activities let students interact and make connections with people they may not see on a daily basis. These connections could be vital in the future, or just be the start of an amazing friendship. Either way, these activities are experiences students will only have once.

The only problem – many students at Hutchinson Community College don’t even know these activities are going on. Students need to know how to stay updated on activities around campus and why they should be involved in them.

“College activities allow students to really build a connection with the staff, their peers, and the entire community,” said Ryan Diehl, HutchCC curriculum/program improvement coordinator. “There is much to be learned from being involved.”

Diehl is also head of the honors program.

Michelle Wortham from the Student Success Center also had some reasons as to why college activities are so important.

“They are a great way to develop interpersonal skills,” Wortham said. “Kids need time to expel energy in a positive way.”

However, the only way to reap the rewards of these activities is to actually go. Many students don’t know what activities are going on, let alone when they take place.

“We are relying mainly on emails and posters to spread the word,” Diehl said.

He said he believes that social media, especially Twitter, is the best place to start sharing activity information.

Signs for activities can be found across campus, and certain television screens also share information on upcoming events. Students can also keep track of their DragonZone accounts for additional information.

“We would be happy to hear other ways to keep students informed,” Wortham said.

One activity coming up is “Wellness Rocks!”, an 80’s/90’s themed Health and Wellness Fair on Sept. 26 from 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

The Reno County Heart Walk is also coming up on Sept. 29, where they will have a one-mile and a three-mile walk, a kid’s zone, snacks, free blood pressure tests, and even Zumba.

Students can visit Jolene Williamson in Human Resources to purchase raffle tickets for the heart walk. Tickets are a dollar each, or five for three dollars. Students have a chance to win a fire pit or a $50 gift card to a Hutchinson restaurant of their choice.

“We want students involved,” Williamson said. “The more we can do to involve students the better”

Later activities include Homecoming, a Halloween dance, Student Treat Day, and a Tacky Sweater 5K in December.