Posts Tagged ‘HutchCC’

Column: The Women’s Corner: How I stay safe on campus

Friday, September 7th, 2018

Tabitha Barr, columnist

As a first time freshman here at Hutchinson Community College, there’s a lot that I had to do to prepare. But there was one basic principle that I completely ignored and is vitally important. As a female in a new environment, I need to be more aware of my surroundings, especially in a setting that is predominately male.

Where I park on campus is a bigger deal than most people think. Most of the time, the student union parking lot is completely full. The next place people usually head to is the parking lots on Plum. Even then, the parking lots provided can be crowded to the brim. This happened to me my third day on campus and I was freaking out to say the least. At that moment the only thing on my mind was finding a parking spot and not be late to class. I ended up parking on a side street and hurriedly fast walked to my class. However, as a female, I forgot to take in my surroundings and prepare myself for the three-minute walk. On my way to class, I passed around 15 other students, most being male. In this time, I was sized up and down, cat-called, and in too close proximity for my liking. This is an important example of how women, especially on campus, need to be aware and ready to defend.

The most common and easily accessible protection that can be bought is mace. Many females on campus already own a mace pack and have it on hand at all times. These are usually stored on keychains or backpacks and are easy to get to.

Another method of protection requires nothing but what most already have on them. A simple car or house key can be the ticket to on hand protection. To have the most successful defense tool, put the key between your pointer and middle finger as close to your knuckle as possible. Have the key part sticking out away from your body and it gives you a security of defense. This is a good method to use at all times of the day no matter where you are.

Finally, the most critical way to stay safe is to watch your surroundings and always have an escape strategy. I have become so paranoid that everywhere I go I have a mental plan on what to do and where to go if something goes wrong. When walking to classes, I make sure to stay where other students and staff can clearly see me. This way if any male was to come and use their dominance against me, others are there to keep me safer. An escape plan is essential to staying safe. Always know where the most populated places are or where a locked place is that is safe to escape to. Women in this day and age are in dangerous areas everyday, but if these methods of protection are followed, we have a better chance of staying safe and protected.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman studying Media Communication and Production

This app can net you Qapital gains

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Campus Editor

Editor’s note – Campus Editor Pablo Sanchez will periodically take a look at and review money-saving apps that could be of use to students.

There are tons of money saving apps out there, whether it’s using McDonalds, Subway, Sonic or financial aid.

At the Google Play Store, there is an app called Qapital, and the most important thing is that the app is free, doesn’t require a credit card and will keep track of your credit score.

Qapital will help you and give tips on how that works as well. Qapital keeps track of your spending and upcoming bills which will allow you to choose how you want to spend your money whether it’s going out to eat or traveling.

Qapital also has a desktop version as well, in which banking information is still saved and you’re able to print out spreadsheets, Qapital breaks down your spending for you and gives tips on how to learn to spend money wisely.

If there is a problem, customer support is quick and helpful. For college students it will make things easier, the process is simple and all you need to do is link your bank information and debit card.

The app will allow you to make plans to reach your goal, whether it’s going out to eat, traveling, getting out of student-load debt, or something else.

Setting limits to spend is always important as a student, and at the end of the week it will tell you how much money you’ve saved. Invite friends and get $5 for free. Overall, the app has weekly updates. The app can assist in direct deposit, too, so if you’re looking to save money, set goals and get good credit, Qapital is for you

High school vs. college security

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

In today’s climate, it is nearly impossible to enter a high school without following the proper protocols. The doors remain locked, visitors must sign in and anything suspicious is immediately reported.

After experiencing these levels of security, students may be shocked by how open Hutchinson Community College seems to be. With the current rise of active shootes, students need to stay aware of safety protocols on campus. How do they compare with high school protocols?

Katherine Sheldon, a freshman from Hutchinson, had this to say about her high school security. “I mean, we would lock doors, and only have one entrance where you could actually get in. We didn’t really have any security guards, we just had the local police.”

The school would have drills every so often where the doors would be locked, lights turned off, and all the students would hide so they were not visible through the window on the door.

When asked about the comparison between HutchCC and her high school, she began to notice some possible issues.

“I mean, the doors aren’t locked, like, at all,” Sheldon said. “It’s easier to get into buildings and the teachers haven’t told us safety protocols for a situation like that.”

She said she assumes that students would follow the same protocols at a high school – lock the doors and hide. She doesn’t know for sure though, and that has her worried. She had a few ideas that she believes would make the campus safer.

“I mean, I don’t know if they have video cameras or anything like that in the hallways, but that would help,” Sheldon said. “Maybe make it more difficult for people to get into the buildings.”

Steve Dunmire, Lead Security Officer, shared some of his knowledge on the protocols here, as well as possible security measures that could be added.

“It can get sort of complicated since the students are adults and we can’t force a decision on how to act,” Dunmire said, describing the difficulties of an active shooter situation.

He has the ability to send alerts over the phone, but that can take a few minutes to reach everyone. According to him, the best way to respond is the “run, hide, or fight” response.

If you can escape campus, do so quickly. If not, find a room to hide in and barricade the door. You can kick out a window if the room has one and escape through it. As a last resort, improvise a weapon and fight your way out of the situation.

“Chairs and tables can make good makeshift weapons. Women’s purses can actually be a good source for improvised weapons. They are usually filled with all sorts of sharp objects,” Dunmire said.

Dunmire has his own ideas on how the campus could be made safer for situations like this.

“I’ve talked about having a campus police department, as well as adding more security cameras,” Dunmire said. “However, it all comes down to money.”

There is still a suggested safety protocol to follow in an active shooter situation, and all the information can be found on DragonZone.

“Of course, if they pick up a paper and read this article, that would definitely help,” Dunmire said.

Bringing comfort to campus: students need a special taste of home when moving to Hutchinson

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor-In-Chief

Any college can be intimidating or uncomfortable the first week or two. Going to a new school, city, state, or even country, adapting can be challenging to some who have troubles getting used to a new environment.

Each Hutchinson Community College student has his or her own way of coping and getting accustomed to campus.

For some, it could be bringing a favorite blanket, picture of a loved one, or even a stuffed animal that has gotten them through many of life’s difficulties. There are also students who are well-adapted to their surroundings and don’t necessarily need an object to ease them into a new atmosphere.

Rachel Lyons, a Newton freshman, has two items she brings with her when she travels.

“I bring my bear and sometimes my Winnie the Pooh blanket whenever I go to a new place” Lyons said. “I’ve had both for many years, the blanket ever since I was in preschool and the bear since I was 1-year-old.”

She said that they are both items she has had forever, so they make her feel more at-home.

Another female student living in the dorms who brings valuable items with her when she settles in a new place is Shaylei Davis, a Jetmore freshman.

“I brought a ton of pictures of my family and friends and a stuffed dog I’ve had literally my whole life,” Davis said.

Along with the pictures and stuffed animal, Davis shared that she brought a figurine given to her by her grandma that reminds her of her dog at home.

“It’s what I’m used to,” Davis said. “All the little decorations I have hold a reason behind, so they are special to me.”

Not only females take belongings from home with them to college, but male students do as well, although they seem to hide it better.

Justin McMurry, a Halstead sophomore, shared the memento he brings from home – a World War II blanket given to him by his uncle when he was 15.

“It’s nice, heavy, and makes me feel safe when I sleep,” McMurry said.

When asked why he is so fond of the blanket, McMurry said, “The reason I cherish it so much is because my uncle means a lot to me, and he originally gave the blanket to my dad, who then gave it to me.”

McMurry agreed that when it comes to being sentimental, men tend not to admit feelings of an item, whereas women generally don’t mind.

“Girls would rather have pictures, stuffed animals, and pillows, whereas guys normally have video games and trinkets they don’t like to talk about,” McMurry said.

Whether or not students bring items symbolizing home to the dorms, the point is to be comfortable. There are students who just need companionship or a daily routine to feel more at ease.

Others like these three students, like to bring mementos from home to feel like wherever they go, will become another home.

Students share thoughts on cafeteria food

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

When you think about cafeteria food often times nothing good comes to mind.

You think back to high school and how terrible the food could be. For some it doesn’t get any better in college.

Cafeterias can be known for the lack of options and lack of healthy food. Three Hutchinson Community College students who live in the dorms were asked what they thought about the food that HutchCC is serving its students and staff.

DJ Mitchell, a sophomore from Washington was asked how many times he eats at the cafeteria compared to fast food. Mitchell said he eats the cafeteria food for almost every meal but that he does eat fast food roughly once a week.

He also has a lot of microwavable food back at his dorm that he eats for meals also. After asking if he actually enjoyed the food served at HutchCC, Mitchell said, “Not really, but I suck it up and eat it.”

The second student was Hannah Hoheisel, a freshman from Garden Plain. Hoheisel splits her time at the cafeteria with how much she eats out, roughly three times a week at both. She said that she would eat there more if there were more options for healthier foods. Hoheisel then said “there needs to be more vegetable options, more fresh fruit. The food makes me feel gross.”

She also said eating at the cafeteria feels awkward when she is alone, and that is why she prefers to eat downstairs in the Parker Student Union at the Blue Dragons Grill. The one good thing about the cafeteria Hoheisel said is that you can eat as much of it as you want.

The last student was Chiani Pearce, Atwood freshman. Pearce eats the cafeteria food five times a week, twice a day. But she also eats out five times a week, mainly because there are not any fast food places back home for her to eat at.

Pearce does buy a lot of groceries at Aldi, she said “Everybody goes to Aldi because it’s so cheap.”

Pearce then goes on to say, “It has nothing to do with the cafeteria, I like that there is so many options.”

However, she said she would not complain if there was more fruits and vegetables available.

The conscious seems to be that the cafeteria food is not terrible but that it has a lot of improvements to be made.

A familiar Blue Dragon is back: Matt Jones, former baseball player, is now playing football

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The last time Matt Jones, a sophomore from Omaha, Nebraska, played football was in 2011 as a high school quarterback.

Now, for the first time in seven years, Jones is back on the football field. Not only is Jones back on the football field, but he is also back at Hutchinson Community College. In 2014, Jones attended HutchCC for the spring semester and played for the baseball team under current coach, Ryan Schmidt. During the 2014 season, Jones, who played as an outfielder, helped lead the Blue Dragons to a 43-17 season, which at the time was the best season the Blue Dragon baseball team had.

That summer, Jones was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 25th round. Jones chased his dream, playing in the minor leagues for four years, before deciding it was time to move on to something else.

Jones’ story for coming back to HutchCC to play football is not your typical story. Jones would occasionally come back to HutchCC to visit and help Schmidt with baseball, leading to the question whether Jones had any college eligibility left. In the summer of 2018, he was asked that question. Jones, of course, did have eligibility, and was asked by athletic director, Josh Gooch, what he thought about playing football.

For Jones, this was a no brainer.

He knew he wanted to come back and play football. And just like that, the plan for Jones to comeback and play football was in the works. Less than an hour later, HutchCC football coach Rion Rhoades was on the phone with Jones telling him that minicamp started the next week.

Now, two months after coming back to HutchCC, Jones is a member of the offensive line and is the starting punter for the Blue Dragons.

With Jones standing at 6-feet, 6-inches and weighing 284 pounds, he is larger than the average punter. Also, at age 24, Jones is a bit older than most players on the football team. As Jones says, “I’m old. Everybody calls me dad and that’s OK.”

With Jones being older than most of the other players, many teammates look up to him. Jones wants to be that guy that others can come to for advice and learn from him. For some, this may a challenge, but Jones handles the job well knowing that he is the “dad” of the team.

Jones being admired doesn’t just stop with his teammates, as Jones is someone whom the coaches respect as well.

“Matt is a great addition,” Rhoades said. “I’m sure that I only know the tip of the iceberg of how he has helped some of our younger players grow and learn and mature through the process.”

While Jones is headed down a very successful path here at HutchCC, he hopes his journey of playing football is not finished just yet saying, “Ideally, I would like to attend a powerhouse NAIA school or a (NCAA) Division II school after I’m done here.”

Sports roundup: Last Chance Who? HutchCC beats Independence

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College football team managed another win Saturday night, against a top-five, nationally-ranked team, as the Blue Dragons won at Independence Community College, 37-27.

This was the first time in 23 years that HutchCC has accomplished beating a top-five nationally ranked team. This puts the Blue Dragons at 2-0 in the Jayhawk Conference.

The Blue Dragons dominated the first half. Tied 7-7, the Dragons went on to score 30-unanswered points.

Starting the third quarter, Independence slowly started to take over. Independence outscored the Blue Dragons 20-0 in the second half.

Jaylen Erwin and Khalil McClain both had two touchdowns, while Dezmon Jackson had one. Defensively, Monty Montgomery and Josh Reliford both had interceptions.

The Blue Dragons next game is Saturday, against Iowa Western Community College at Gowans Stadium.

Men’s cross country – The men’s cross country team made some Blue Dragon history on Friday. The Blue Dragons won their first team championship since 2016.

Andrew Kibe lead the way for the Blue Dragons winning the 2018 season-opening Terry Masterson Twilight Classic, with a time of 19 minutes, 32.7 seconds.

Hutch then took over having four Blue Dragons place seventh through 10th. Sophomore Connor Kaufman was seventh in a time of 21:13.19. Freshman Brett Hillabrand was eighth in 21:39.83. Sophomore Kade Gerlach was ninth in 21:47.99 and sophomore Jared Stark was 10th in 21:50.81.

Hutchinson lead the way scoring 29 team points. Runner-up Cloud County had 38 points, followed by Dodge City with 81, Pratt with 114 and McPherson College with 115.

Women’s cross country – The women also had six runners finish in the top 10 Friday, allowing them to win the Terry Masterson Twilight Classic.

The Blue Dragons also had the lowest team score last Friday, with a team score of 25 points. Dodge City, followed with 57 points, with Pratt behind them with 62 points and McPherson College was fourth with 91 points.

Hutchinson freshman Lisayo Ewoi pulled away in the last couple yards, finishing with a time of 18:32.8. In fourth place was sophomore Aileen Gomez with a time of 19:49.4, and behind her was Freshman Gabby Collins placing fifth with a time of 19:55.5. Then sophomore Sarah Patteson placed sixth 19:58.6. Sophomore America Garcia finished eighth with a time of 20:20.0. Sophomore Macy Linenberger was 13th with a time of 20:49.2. Sophomore Ashton Schlickau was 17th with a time of 21:32.0. Caitlin Schlickau was 18th with a time of 21:38.0. Carissa Youngs finished 27th with a time of 23:02.

Soccer – The women’s soccer team managed to smash North Iowa, 11-0, on Saturday at Salthawk Sports Complex. The first four goals were scored within the first eight minutes of the game.

Sophomore Brailey Moeder started off the game with a goal, assist from the goalkeeper, Yadira Delgado. After a goal from sophomore Megan Maslak, Moeder followed with a second goal. Then, freshman Addi White scored the third goal, first goal of the season for her.

 

The Blue Dragons are now 2-0, moving on to the next game Wednesday against Northwest Kansas Technical College, at Goodland

Volleyball – The volleyball team started in a struggle to get into its groove in the first two sets against Pratt. The Blue Dragons rebounded and finished with a three-set sweep, as they improved to 3-3 and 2-0 in the Jayhawk West.

Here’s a recap of the three sets.

Set 1 – The Blue Dragons started the first set with a lead of 4-2. Pratt pulled it to 11-10 until Sophomore Lexi Hogan had a kill, allowing the Dragons to bounce back. They won the set 25-23.

Set 2 – Lauren Wilson helped the Blue Dragons to another set victory, coming off the bench with a kill. Later, Wilson had another kill, which gave Hutch a 23-20 lead. Hutch then missed three set points, but yet again Wilson had a kill. The Blue Dragons won 28-26.

Set 3 – The Blue Dragons finally got in a groove with back-to-back blocks from Hydeah Hinesman and Eden Hiebert. Hutch won 25-12.

Baseball team ready for some ‘clubhouse jacks’

Monday, May 7th, 2018

A look inside the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A broken window and peeling paint are prominent at the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A wind gust blew off a set of lights near right field at Hobart-Detter Field, damaging a bathroom.

The light pole that lost the lights during a wind storm.

A look at the current clubhouse being built beyond the left-field wall.

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

The Hutchinson Community College baseball team is expecting a new clubhouse soon. It has been long overdue for this installment at Hobart-Detter Field.

The new amenities featured in the clubhouse, which will be located about 50 feet behind the left-field fence, include – a new maintenance facility for half of the building, and the other half will be used as a locker room, laundry area, bathroom, coaches’ office and umpire locker room.

The clubhouse will also be used by the Hutchinson Monarchs, a summer collegiate wood-bat baseball team.

“The city is funding the building,” said HutchCC baseball coach Ryan Schmidt. “We are extremely excited about the building.”

Schmidt also said that the new building will help compete against others in the Blue Dragons’ conference – the Jayhawk West – that have modern clubhouses and enhance help in recruiting.

“We can’t thank the City of Hutchinson enough for seeing this project through and giving our players a great space to call home,” Schmidt said.

The old clubhouse with its busted windows and chipped paint looks just as bad on the inside as it does on the outside. In addition to chipped paint and broken windows is a foul odor wafting inside the clubhouse.

The team is looking forward to having a location for private meetings and more room for equipment.

HutchCC freshman, Dylan Nedved said, “I’m so excited for it, we’re going to hit a lot of clubhouse jacks. We’re going to put some holes in that roof.”

Nedved said the phrase, “clubhouse jacks” is an inside joke and another way of saying hitting home runs that hit the roof of the clubhouse.

Another freshman, Cameron Crandall, shared his excitement for the new clubhouse.

“I think everyone will realize how much space we have now instead of being crowded in our old one,” Crandall said.

Along with the new clubhouse being built, new light fixtures are expected to be put on the field within a year. Damage from the wind April 18 caused one set of lights to fall on the first-base-side restroom building at the baseball field. Only about one-third of the roof was damaged.

 

 

Letter from the Editor to our Readers: Thank you

Monday, May 7th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

The Hutchinson Collegian, over the course of the last two years that I have served on the staff, has changed massively, but not without the help and encouragement from our readers like you.

Coming into this new school year, The Collegian staff was, except for me, entirely new. Over the summer, I was so, so afraid that our newspaper would cease to exist without a staff or advisor but, not only did we survive, we thrived with our new brand new staff, most straight out of high school and our amazing advisor, Brad Hallier.

We want to thank our readers for picking up our papers, for the encouraging comments and for working with us when we pursue a story. Producing a weekly paper with a largely volunteer staff has not always been easy, but it always got done, and we have been continually proud of what we call our ‘weekly miracle’.

Next year, in a more fortunate turn of events for her, Brenna Eller will become editor of The Collegian, and many more current members of our staff will be returning, along with the many new students who have enrolled so far.

In addition to being a campus newspaper, we are a class. Behind these pages are students working to deliver what we believe to be important campus information and learning, sometimes for the first time, how to produce a proper story and design a page.

But our staff certainly did something right with our new education, collectively we brought home multiple awards of which we couldn’t be prouder.

But, without our paper boxes emptying out week after week, truly the newspaper would cease to exist.

So continue reading your college newspaper, tell our new staffers next year how well they’re doing, and feel free to provide recommendations and story ideas, of any kind. Encourage your fellow students or staff members to become a regular reader, and follow The Collegian social media.

The continued support of our readers means that some new journalism student will perhaps gain a larger passion for the career and continue to pursue journalism for a lifetime.

 

Student provides insight on North Korean peace

Monday, May 7th, 2018

History has been shifting the last few weeks with the news that North Korea has finally agreed to offer peace to South Korea and the United States.

In general, western news outlets have praised North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for this action, and many comments on articles are in support of the historic decision.

A Hutchinson Community College student with strong interest in international affairs has been approached by peers for comment on the peace offering and, although he said he is required to remain anonymous, has agreed to an interview with The Hutchinson Collegian.

The Western Media

Perhaps his biggest concern is the glorification of the deal by Western media.

“What I’m seeing right now is a gross manifestation of the South Korean liberal government apologetic movement that embraces North Korea very blindly,” he said. “When I see news comments that people leave on Facebook, they’re all for it and they don’t seem to cast a shadow of doubt in this current state of affairs where (the South Korean and American) government seems to make a peace accord with North Korea without any predisposition whatsoever against North Korea.

“American news outlets are handling the situation absolutely horribly. The thing about the U.S and South Korean media is that they beautify and they benevolize the North Korean authorities in the grossest manner. For example, in the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, the North Korean invoice visited South Korea, and I came across a few CNN articles, and I was absolutely aghast because the headlines were ‘Look at how Kim Jong-un’s sister handles herself in such a graceful manner.’ ‘Look at her fashion.’ ‘Look at how she gracefully does whatever.’ Do they have any idea what is going on in North Korea?”

The largest player in creating a false narrative of true peace, according to the student, is the news that is wrapped up in embracing, without doubt, the peace deal.

“The thing about the media today is they’re incredibly selective, and you should be equally selective to counter that effect,” he said. “You should be very critical to begin with, and especially if they start reporting their own opinions mixed in with the agendas that they are trying to push. People have been flooded with the one-sided information of North Korea, and you should start being skeptical and looking at the facts.”

The Hidden Horrors

The peace agreement, though not malicious on the surface, has been a cause of concern for many who know what happens behind North Korea’s borders.

“Everyone thinks of North Korea as some sort of joke but it is a very, very dangerous atmosphere there,” he said.

Although the historic event is newsworthy, there is yet to be proof that North Korea is willing to change.

“As far as I’m concerned, they have not displayed a single shred of evidence of commitment towards peace or the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” he said. “North Korea is the most violent, most radical state actor that practices Marxist-Leninism in the most pathological fashion.”

After recent events, the source had been approached by several curious peers seeking insight from their politically-inclined friend.

“When people ask me how I would describe North Korea in a very simple fashion, I tell them that North Korea is like a pressure cooker ready to blow,” he said. “The level of deceit among the commoners in North Korea is beyond your imagination. People are dying of starvation every day and people try to defect from North Korea, even though it means certain death for them and their family, if they get caught. They’re defecting at a rate that has been unprecedented before, so that should speak some volumes about what the state of of North Korea is like.”

The student doubts North Korea’s willingness to denuclearize due to their dependence on the alternative weapons.

“What North Korea has done is a very dangerous move,” he said. “Both nations supposedly agreed to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, which made me giggle quite hard because North Korea has not shown a shred of evidence towards denuclearization. They changed their entire rhetoric three months ago when before that they had constantly said, consistently, that they were going to pursue the nuclear weapons program.”

Without their nuclear weapons, he said he believes North Korea would fall to South Korea.

“North Korea’s entire regime hinges upon the asymmetrical and unconventional warfare capabilities that are in the form of nuclear weapons,” he said. “It transcends any other countries dependence on such program because North Korea has the largest military, in terms of sheer number. Every citizen is mandated to serve for at least a decade. But without nuclear weapons or CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense) capabilities, South Korea alone, without even U.S support, could crush North Korea.”

Assuming that South Korea, the United States and North Korea can come to a mutual agreement, the student believes there should be strict stipulations.

America’s Involvement

“The U.S will undoubtedly play a major role in this situation, because the U.S is South Korea’s closest ally,” He said. “I have no doubt that President Trump will pursue a goal that will be in America’s best interests, but a real danger that I see is a parallel to Obama’s Iran Nuclear Deal. The false narrative Obama propagated throughout the media was that it was a win, when it was clearly not. It’s still being bashed from the whole political spectrum, because it granted Iran the right to pursue their own nuclear interest. The false narrative in which leaders create to show themselves as a winner is the same risk that I see Trump repeating for himself.”

Perhaps more worrying for the student is the number of American protesters supporting the same ideology that dictates North Korea.

“The fundamental tenets of the political left and communism are very similar in nature,” He said. “They call out for equality of outcome and they importance of group identity trumping individual characteristics and violence if they don’t agree with you. The reason I say communism is a murderous ideology, and I say that for a very good reason, is that just take a look at history. People have forgotten the simple truth of life that grass is green, the sky is blue, and communists cannot be trusted.”

The student said that he believes that many people waving the communist flag, whether they do so ironically or not, are oblivious to the horrors that exist within communist North Korea.

“Imagine someone doing that with a Nazi flag – you have an immediate response to that because Nazis have committed horrible atrocities in the 20th century,” he said. “The communist flag represents the same. They are completely oblivious to the havoc that these communist and Marxist ideologies have wrought upon the world.”