Posts Tagged ‘HutchCC’

Roundup: Busters steal late win vs. Blue Dragons

Friday, November 9th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

With 18 seconds left Saturday in the biggest game in the season for Hutchinson Community College football team, jaws were dropped.

The Blue Dragons had a chance to win a Jayhawk Conference championship on its home field, Gowans Stadium, against No. 2 Garden City. But Garden City’s Charles West’s 6-yard reception with put Garden City up 24-21, leading the Busters to a victory over No. 4 Hutchinson. The Blue Dragons fell to 6-2 and 6-1 in the Jayhawk Conference.

Sophomore running back Dezmon Jackson had an outstanding performance, breaking the school record for the longest run from scrimmage with a 97-yard touchdown run, giving the Dragons a 14-7 lead early in the third quarter.

Jackson becomes the first Blue Dragon to rush for 1,000 yards since 2012 when Terrell Lane did. Jackson currently has 1,050 yards. Jackson also has had two runs for more than 90 yards, four runs better than and 80 yards and 11 runs better than 20 yards all this season.

Jackson’s 18-yard touchdown gave the Blue Dragons lead 21-17 with 9:30 left to play.

Hutchison’s Clarence Hicks then had a quarterback sack with 6:24 left to play, but Garden City had the ball with 4:11 left.

The Blue Dragons held Garden City’s nation-leading rushing offense to 150 yards.

HutchCC quarterback Mason Schucker completed 12 of 21 passes for 158 yards. Jaylen Erwin had four catches, a season high with 109 yards.

Linebacker Money Montgomery had the third most tackles by a Blue Dragon in one game with 21 tackles, with one forced fumble. Jahmard Morgan had 13 tackles and Jamykal Neal had a career-high 10 tackles.

The Blue Dragon with end their regular season at home on Saturday against Iowa Central, kickoff at noon.

Volleyball – The Hutchinson Community College volleyball team pulled off a win in the semifinals of the Region 6 Tournament in Liberal, a four-set 15-25, 25-21, 25-19, 25-20 win over Colby on Sunday at the Green House in Liberal.

In the championship match the Blue Dragons were defeated by top seed Seward County 25-19, 25-22, 25-22, ending the Blue Dragons’ season. The Saints will advance to the NJCAA Division 1 National Championship later this month in Hutchinson.

Colby dominated the first set in game one 25-15. The Blue Dragons followed with 25-21 lead, winning the last three matches.

Seward County won all three matches in game two for the Blue Dragons, finishing their season.

Women’s basketball – The No. 13-ranked Hutchinson Community College women’s basketball team opened the season by crushing its opponent, the Bethany College junior varsity, 107-32 on Thursday at the Sports Arena.

The Blue Dragons shot almost 54 percent overall and managed 26 steals.

Freshman Milan Schimmel had a 19 points,  four rebounds, two assists and two steals.  Sophomore Jada Mickens had 17 points. Sophomore Dejanae Roebuck had 14 points and four steals.

Freshman Abby Ogle had 12 points, seven rebounds, five assists and five steals. Sophomore Tia Bradshaw had nine points, four steals and three assists. Tijuana Kimbro and freshman Makayla Vannet, had eight points.

Men’s basketball –  James Rojas scored 22 points, and Fred Odihiambo added 13 points and nine rebounds as the Blue Dragons pounded Northern Oklahoma College-Enid 109-68 on Tuesday in Enid, Oklahoma.

Chris Giles addd 16 points, while DJ Mitchell scored 19 points off the bench. The Blue Dragons improved to 3-0 with the win.

 

Law enforcement impersonators at large

Friday, November 9th, 2018

By Kat Collins
Staff writer

On Monday, the Hutchinson Police Department sent a press release about some people pretending to be security and police in parks around the city.

The Hutch PD said that the suspects have approached parked vehicles in city parks, identifying themselves as the security or police and asking one of the people to exit the car. Then, once the person is outside the vehicle, the victims have reported being sexually assaulted.
The City of Hutchinson does not employ any sort of Park Security. The only law enforcement that patrols the parks around the city, are commissioned law enforcement that include the HPD, Reno County Sheriff’s Office, and Kansas Highway Patrol.

If you are contacted by someone in a city park claiming to be a police officer or park security, you should lock your doors and on roll up your windows on your car. The officer should show you their official badge, name and badge number.

If you have doubt during the contact, inform the officer that you are calling 911 to verify their Identity. If the officer tries to stop you from calling 911, remain on the line with 911 and drive to the Law Enforcement Center at 210 W 1st, Hutchinson.

If the said officer you are questioning leaves the scene, call 911 and report the incident Immediately.

Hey Blue Dragon fans and Hutchinson residents – get your ass to Gowans Stadium on Saturday

Friday, November 2nd, 2018

Hey Hutchinson residents and Blue Dragon fans – the game against Hutchinson Community College’s rival Garden City Community College will be on Saturday at noon, so be there or be square.

HutchCC is ranked No.4, and our team is full of amazing talent that barely gets seen. It’s just so sad to think that these guys work so hard to get to where they are and people don’t show up to watch them. If you played sports in high school or are currently playing a different sport, wouldn’t you want people cheering on your team and yelling words of encouragement? Looking into such a small crowd is discouraging for the team, and it probably makes them feel underappreciated.

School spirit has really diminished over the years. Is it due to not having loyalty to your school or because you still only root for your hometown high school team? I can assure you that you don’t have to only cheer for one team. Everyone has their favorite professional or NFL team they like, so why can’t you have a favorite junior college team?

Even if it’s cold out, that shouldn’t necessarily keep anyone from attending a game. You can bundle up, bring hot chocolate or coffee, and dress for the weather. Most football games tend to be chilly. That’s just how it is in the fall.

I know there are some valid reasons for not attending the game, if you work or have a family event/emergency, but if you are doing absolutely nothing on a Saturday and especially are in Hutchinson, you may as well make an experience out of the day and go to the game.

Not only does watching the game at Gowans Stadium give you a chance to socialize with family or friends, but also gives you a chance to get into the HutchCC and local spirit, and show some pride in the school. No one wants to go to a college football game that isn’t hyped up. Having a fun audience makes the whole game exciting.

What happened to student sections? What is a football game, or any game, for that matter without the heckling of the other team? It just isn’t fun at all. The best games are ones that crowds interact in the most.

Another fantastic reason to come to the game on Saturday is because any student or instructor at the college gets in free with their I.D. That should make everyone want to go. That way, you have some money for stadium food or a hot drink.

A big crowd makes coaches and players happy and fired up, so help them out and cheer them on. There should never be home games with a half-empty stadium. so fill in those seats, deck yourself out in blue and red, and show support for your school and the Blue Dragons.

Brenna Eller is a Little River sophomore studying journalism. She is the Collegian Editor in Chief.

Dez-ert storm: Blue Dragon running back has been dominant

Friday, November 2nd, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

It’s week nine for the Hutchinson Community College football team, and one it’s one of the biggest weeks for the Blue Dragons.

The No. 4-ranked Blue Dragons will face No. 2 ranked Garden City at noon at Gowans Stadium, one of the biggest games of the season.

Growing up, sophomore, Dezmon Jackson, from El Dorado, Arkansas, went to a small 2A high school, Parker’s Chapel, playing running back on offense and linebacker on defense. Jackson then came to Hutchinson Community College, where he has made a name for himself.

Jackson received his third straight Jayhawk Conference Football Offensive Player of the Week award. Jackson has had four straight games with at least 100 yards and six games with at least one touchdown.

“My last couple of game has been great,” Jackson said. “I’ve had four to five straight 100-plus-yard games so I’m just trying to keep my head on steady and improve my game every week.”

As a sophomore, Jackson has doubled his stats from the 2017 football year, and has a total of 10 touchdowns for the season already.

“I’ve developed so much that I amaze myself,” Jackson said. “I just changed my whole mindset, being that I didn’t play as much I think I should have last year. So, I was just itching to get back out there and every game and that has helped me this year.”

Jackson also has another motivation – New Orleans Saints running back, Alvin Kamara. Kamara is a pervious HutchCC football player.

“It’s a motivation to me mainly because we played the same position,” Jackson said. “So, when I put it into perspective it just drives me to know I can make it out of here.”

Jackson is currently undecided what school he will be attending next year but plans on narrowing down the list soon.

“I have offers to choose from and I plan on narrowing the list by November,” Jackson said.

Spooky Legends: Theorosa’s Bridge continues to haunt

Friday, October 19th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff Writer

A concrete bridge sits just a few miles outside the small town of Valley Center. If you were to drive past it, you probably would not notice anything out of the ordinary. However, this bridge may be one of the most haunted places in Kansas.

The stories seem to vary, especially as the years go by. Every manifestation of the legend revolves around a mother and her baby. The earliest legend takes place late in the 1800s.

According to the story, Indians attacked a wagon full of settlers and stole a baby named Theorosa. The mourning mother roamed the area, calling out for her lost child until she herself died. It is said that you can still hear her calling out for Theorosa.

In a more modern version, the story is that a farm wife named Theorosa gave birth to an illegitimate child. She threw the baby into the river to drown it, then drowned herself out of guilt.

Rumors are that if you go to the bridge and announce that you have her child, she will attack you and try to throw you into the river as well.

Like most haunted location, the bridge has become somewhat of a local attraction, piquing the interest of believers and skeptics alike.

One visitor, Linda Ritter, recounted her experience on Angels and Ghosts, a paranormal blog.

Ritter and her friends said they experienced an overwhelming sense of sadness as they drove over the bridge.

“I have been to several places and had experiences, but not quite like this,” Ritter said.

After stopping, the group tried to call out for Theorosa. While at first nothing happened, one by one they started to hear the sounds of a baby crying. One girl said she felt something bump against her. They left soon after.

The next morning, the girl who said she had been bumped found a dark bruise on her body, exactly where she had felt it the night before.

Many visitors have reported similar occurrences, such as the appearance of a woman’s ghost, cold winds, unexplained vehicle problems, and the sounds of a baby crying.

The bridge, originally built out of iron and wood, burned down in 1974, only to be rebuilt and burned down again in 1976. After closing for 15 years, the bridge was again rebuilt in 1991, this time in its current concrete state.

For those interested in checking this ghostly bridge out, it is located at 109th street North and Meridian. Over the years, the bridge has been a common spot for vandalism and is now covered in graffiti.

If you decide to taunt the ghost of Theorosa, do it at your own risk, and be prepared for a haunting encounter.

Blog: http://www.angelsghosts.com/theorosas_bridge_ghost_story

Photo taken from: https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/kansas/theorosas-bridge-kansas/

 

 

Spooky Legends: Local library lore

Friday, October 19th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor In Chief

Those who have been to the Hutchinson Public Library may not know that there is an interesting history right in front of them.

Some have noticed when Google searching, “Most haunted places in Kansas”, that the public library usually appears at the top of the list.

From library employees to patrons, many people have claimed to encounter the ghost of a librarian named Ida Miranda Day-Holzapfel, who was one of the first librarians at the Main Street location and worked all over Kansas in several different libraries. Kate Lewis, who works as Marketing and Communications at the library, researched Ida Day and found a lot of new information that most never knew, and sent it to Reno County Museum.

Lewis said that Ida Day had unfinished business at the library and believes that the high electromagnetic field in the basement explains why she seems to be most active in there.

Lewis said that Ida Day was born in Colony in 1888 and was hired at Hutchinson Public Library, then located at 5th and Main Street – now the Union Labor Temple – in 1916 at the age of 28 after being a teacher in Colony and Iola. She made $75 a month and was given a two-weeks paid vacation.

In 1917, during the library remodeling, “Ida and her assistants cataloged and classified every book, a thing which was never done before,” Lewis said, “One of the best ideas which Miss Day has inaugurated into the system of management is the perfection of the reference arrangements.”

Lewis also said that Ida helped people look up any number of books. Ida also mounted and classified 3,000 pictures during this time.

One of Miss Day’s many achievements was sending books out to soldiers during WWI in 1918.

Ida Day was library director from 1916-1925.

In 1925, Ida took a leave of absence for a year to study at the University of Kansas. In 1926, Ida resigned.

Ida was married at the age of 52 to John Holzapfel, in 1940.

In 1946, Ida returned to the library, and there had been plans for another remodel since the population doubled. They wound up building a new library, which is where it is now. Ida even wrote an article for the Library Journal in 1949, which was titled, “Hutchinson Builds Modern Library”, where she described the modernization that was taking place and even included blueprints for the new library.

Ida yet again served as Library Director of the Hutchinson Public Library from 1946-1954

Her husband died in 1948, the same year her sister, Sarah Elizabeth Mather, died.

On Feb. 1, 1954 Ida resigned from the public library and prepared herself to become head of the catalog department at the Tulare County library system in Visalia, Calif. on March 1.

“A wish to be relieved from the administrative duties prompted the change,” Holzapfel said.

She was going to keep her home in Hutchinson at 430 East 12th, which is one of the student/faculty parking lots of Hutchinson Community College.

Ida Day died from a fatal car accident in California at the age of 65.

Lewis was one who has experienced unexplainable things in the library, one of which was when she first was given a tour of the basement and got chills where she felt the hair on her head stand up.

Another experience was while taking photographs with her 7-year old daughter for a stuffed animal sleepover program.

“She doesn’t know about the library ghost,” Lewis said. “I didn’t want her to be scared of the library.”

They walked to the location where the Children’s Services supplies are, which include puppets and paper-mache sculptures in the oldest area of the building built in 1951.

“I thought my daughter would be fascinated,” Lewis said, “Instead, she instantly said that she didn’t like the room and that it felt scary.”

Lewis also said that her daughter didn’t want her to take pictures of the animals and just wanted them to get out of there.

The Hutchinson Public Library Business Manager, Tina Stropes, had a strange encounter with Ida Day about 15 years ago, in 2003. Stropes was working on payroll, adding up timesheets when her calculator started printing “0.00” repeatedly.

“We decided that it was Ida Day wanting to get paid, but she didn’t work any hours,” Stropes said.

That isn’t all that happened, because the next month of doing payroll, Stropes’ calculator did the same thing and she told Ida that she wasn’t working any hours so she wasn’t getting paid and the calculator stopped.

There were other experiences, such as visitors being poked and no one would be there, and some had feelings of being watched.

Whether a believer of ghosts or not, the Hutchinson Public Library is a historical building with an interesting past and is worth the visit to many.

Sports roundup: Football team wins at Coffeyville

Friday, October 19th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The No. 4-ranked Hutchinson Community College football team completed its best start to a season since 2014 with a dominant defensive performance Saturday night at Veterans Memorial Stadium in Coffeyville.

The Blue Dragons overcame offensive season lows in first downs and passing, to defeat Coffeyville 24-14.

The win also came without coach Rion Rhoades, who was serving a one-game suspension after being ejected the week before.

The Blue Dragons have won five consecutive games, and now sit 7-1. The Blue Dragons remain unbeaten in the Jayhawk Conference at 5-0.

Hutchinson’s defense had a season-high nine quarterback sacks and two interceptions, with one returned for a touchdown.

Monty Montgomery had four tackles and three quarterback sacks. He also intercepted a Coffeyville pass and returned it 25 yards for a touchdown.

Dezmon Jackson’s first touch of the game went for a 90-yard touchdown. Jackson’s run tied three others for the second-longest run from scrimmage in Blue-Dragon history.

Freshman quarterback Mason Schucker had a rough night, going 10 of 22 passing for a season- low 88 yards and an interception.

The Blue Dragons travel to Dodge City next Saturday with a 1 p.m. kickoff time.

Women’s cross country – The No. 6-ranked Hutchinson Community College women’s cross country team captured another win of the season with three runners placing in the top 10 at the Fort Hays State Open.

This is the Blue Dragons second team championship this season.

The Blue Dragons scored 51 points, with freshmen Lisayo Ewoi and Gabby Collins, and sophomore Sarah Patterson placing in the Top 10.

The HutchCC women’s cross country team is off for two weeks before competing in the Region 6 Championships in Winfield.

Men’s cross country – The No. 10-ranked men’s cross country team had its three-race winning streak snapped by two points. The men’s team finished second overall at Fort Hays State.

The Blue Dragons were edged out by Jayhawk Conference and Region 6 rival Colby, 55-57.

Freshman Andrew Kibet also lost his three-race winning streak, placing second to Cloud County runner, Dennis Kiptoo.

The HutchCC men’s team will compete in the Region 6 Championships on October 27.

Soccer – The Hutchinson Community College women’s soccer team had its ninth straight shutout of the season, in a 2-0 Jayhawk West victory on Saturday over Dodge City.

The Blue Dragons improve to 11-2-1 overall and 9-2-1 in Jayhawk West play.

It didn’t take long for HutchCC to get on the board when freshman Sydney Blackwell scored her seventh of the season.

Sophomore Brailey Moeder gave the Blue Dragons an insurance goal when she found the back of the net for her 10th goal of the year.

The Blue Dragons will play host to Pratt at 6 p.m. on Wednesday night for Sophomore Night at the Salthawk Sports Complex.

Volleyball – The volleyball team traveled to West Plains, Missouri, to play a series of matches at the Grizzly Invitational at the West Plains Civic Center.

Sophomore libero Raychel Reed became the fourth Dragon in program history to reach 1,000 career digs during the weekend. The Blue Dragons dropped three of the four matches, but every loss went at least four sets.

 

Take it on the run

Friday, October 19th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

More than 8,000 miles from home, Andrew Kibet is one of Hutchinson Community College’s top cross country runners.

Kibet, a freshman, grew up in Eldoret, Kenya a total of 8,440 miles from his new home in central Kansas.

Hutchinson, was a place for Kibet to explore his dreams.

“I was excited to come to a new place, but it’s hard, with the U.S. being so big,” Kibet said.

Growing up, Kibet came from a town – and a country – of long-distance runners but ended up playing volleyball in high school at Kitany Secondary.

When asked if he missed playing volleyball, Kibet said with a smile, “Not much.”

Kibet thought about coming to the United States to study and compete, but never thought about running long distance, like cross country. Many men’s college races are 8,000 meters, or nearly five miles.

“I’ve never thought of running distances,” Kibet said. “I grew up mainly running the 1,500 and 800. This was the first cross country (race) I ever did.”

Kibet did not take long to adjust to distance running.

“Track is speed and (cross country is) endurance,” Kibet said.

Kibet also knows that his success, and the Blue Dragons cross country team, wouldn’t be as good without the help of his teammates.

“It’s a great team,” Kibet said. “I can’t do it alone. It’s about teamwork. It’s the most perfect team when it comes to training.”

Coach Justin Riggs has been impressed and for good reason. Kibet won the Terry Masterson Twilight Classic at Fun Valley Sports Complex, and he also won the Missouri Southern State Stampede, while finishing second at the Fort Hays State Tiger Open.

“Andrew has been good, really good,” Riggs said. “He’s worked really hard and is also naturally gifted. Where he grew up, the altitude and training was at 7,000 feet, that makes a big difference. It’s a blessing.”

The Blue Dragons will compete next on Saturday, Oct. 27 at the Region 6 Cross Country Championships.

Overcoming adversity: ‘Breaking Bad’ actor R.J. Mitte speaks about overcoming challenges in his life

Friday, October 5th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Collegian Editor-In-Chief

When a child is asked what they want to be when they grow up, they hardly ever say sitting in an office all day or doing something they aren’t fond of. Instead they say they want to be a doctor, firefighter, singer, or even an actor/actress. The limits have seemed to change for college students who once had those dreams themselves.

Twenty-six-year-old actor, model, and cerebral palsy activist, R.J Mitte who spoke at the Ray and Stella Dillon Lecture Series on Tuesday Oct. 2 at the Sports Arena, explains that no one should limit themselves on what they can or can’t do. Mitte spoke about struggles he has faced with the condition and stressed the thought, “Can’t is a decision, and a mindset.”

Mitte is most known for roles in television shows, the main one being Walter White Jr. on AMC’s hit show “Breaking Bad”, who has cerebral palsy, same as Mitte, except in reality, Mitte’s condition is milder, so he had to slow his speech and learn to walk with crutches for the show.

Mitte, like others with CP, was born with the disorder where the brain lacks the appropriate amount of oxygen.  Mitte is also known for characters he played in “Switched at Birth”, “Weeds”, “Vegas”, and even acted in “Hannah Montana” and “Everybody Hates Chris”.

Still acting, Mitte helps with several charities on the side, such as Shriners Hospitals for Children, Special Olympics, ALS Associations, and many more organizations dedicated to helping others.

Mitte was born and raised in Lafayette, Louisiana. From age 3-13, his mother took him to Shriners Hospital for many types of therapy and braces. Mitte was a “severe toe walker and his feet bent downwards, so he walked on the tips of his toes, so he had to go through a lot of physical therapy. During his lecture, Mitte described the casts he had to wear and shared about sticking frozen coins in them during the hot summer to cool his legs.

Despite his optimism, growing up with the disorder had its challenges. Even though Mitte participated in normal childhood activities like soccer and riding dirt bikes, he explained what it was like with bullies.

“People with disabilities don’t want to be labeled as disabled,” Mitte said.

He also explained how a lot of people stand by while bullying takes place.

“If you see something, say something,” Mitte said. “Everyone has the ‘someone else will take care of it’ mentality and we need to break it.”

Mitte followed that thought with a story involving a blind man on the same plane as him recently. The man was in need of assistance, according to Mitte, and got lost trying to figure out where he was going. Mitte decided to step up and guide the man, even though he was a stranger and several people were watching the blind man struggle, yet Mitte was the only one that took initiative.

From a young age, Mitte learned the importance of self-worth. His grandfather pushed the philosophy of “Can’t say can’t” and the idea stuck with him. When answering his grandpa, Mitte had two options, “Yes”, or “I wasn’t in the room, or didn’t hear you.”

His grandfather showed him that even though people told Mitte he couldn’t do specific things, that it was their decision, not his and wanted him to be the best he could be.

Mitte not only faced his own obstacles, but his family’s as well. When he was 12-and-a-half years old, Mitte’s mother was in a car accident that partially paralyzed her for seven years. His grandfather also suffered a stroke that left him fully paralyzed on the left side.

“Without challenges, where would we be in our lives?” Mitte said. “It’s those challenges that shape us.”

In 2006 Mitte’s family moved to California to support his sister, Lacianne, while she was trying out for an acting opportunity. That was also the time, Mitte was recognized and started going to acting classes just for fun and to meet kids his own age. Before he knew it, Mitte was pushed into the entertainment industry, or as he called it, “The Mob”.

The main focus of Mitte’s speech was to not limit yourself to the small things, but instead reach as far as you can, and then even further.

“It’s up to you how far you want to reach,” Mitte said. “Step out of your realm of comfort.”

When asked earlier in the press conference what the overall message would be to the Hutchinson Community College students, Mitte said, “Protect your brand and image, you are cultivating your business, jobs look at you as an individual on social media and what you represent.”

Mitte also wanted to inform students that being aware of who they are and not being afraid to show people their true self is important.

“The people around you set your tone, if you don’t stand up for something, then who will?,” Mitte said. “We only get one chance to show people who and what we are, so stand up for what you believe in, what we believe is all we have.”

 

 

Championship aspirations: Football team improves to 5-1 again

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College football team is off to a hot start again this season.

The Blue Dragons are sitting at 5-1 after a big win over Butler Community College on Saturday night at Gowans Stadium. This 5-1 start might look familiar to some folks, as the Blue Dragons started 5-1 during the 2017 season as well.

Although the 2017 Blue Dragons started 5-1, they eventually went down a rocky path. Out of the last six games the football team played last year, they only won two games and finished 7-5. The team hopes to avoid a slide like that again this year.

Blue Dragons coach Rion Rhoades is more optimistic about this year’s finish. The character of the football team is better than it has been in years’ past. The team also seems to be more prepared and there seems to be more trust between the players and coaches as well.

The team is also still relatively healthy, compared to last year’s team, which lost five of their top 12 offensive linemen. As the season continues, the team hopes to remain healthy and keep their attention on the game.

“Our focus is to just continue to get better at what we do. Getting off to a good start is proven to be an important thing for us. We’ve just played a lot better when we get out of the shoot and score some points right off the bat and get some stops,” Rhoades said.

With only five regular season games left, starting with Saturday’s homecoming game against Highland at Gowans Stadium, the Blue Dragons must continue to work hard.

Leading the way is freshman quarterback Mason Schucker. Schucker, a true freshman from Searcy, Arkansas, is currently tied for first in the Jayhawk Conference with 10 touchdown passes. He has just three interceptions.

“Everybody on the team is excited about being 5-1,” Schucker said. “They know we have a good shot of finishing out the rest of the season really well. We know that it could lead to bigger things as well and everybody’s just really excited to play each week, each game and get out there and practice and get better every day.”