Posts Tagged ‘Dillion Lecture Series’

The Dillon Lecture Series celebrates milestone speaker

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Staff writer

The Dillon Lecture Series was a dream for two women, Barbara Peirce and Jeanette Mull. These two women wanted to bring a similar event that started at Kansas State University, to Hutchinson Community College.

This has become an event that has now been taking place for over 36 years at HutchCC. This event is now called The Dillon Lecture Series.

The Dillon Lecture Series started on March 29, 1982, with Richard Morefield, who had been an Iranian hostage. The public, college professors, students and staff were all invited to this event. Over 2,000 people attended the first lecture. Because, this event received great responses, they decided to keep it going.

With the hard work of the Dillon Lecture Series committee, HutchCC has been able to keep this event up and running for 36 years and been able to get some big names.

Robin Woodworth, the coordinator for the Dillon Lecture Series said, “Most big names are through speaker agencies, but some have been arranged through connections of Dillon Lecture committee members or community members.”

Arranging for guest speakers to come take a lot of preparation. The committee first must confirm the guest speaker, and arrange the contract.

“Once a speaker is confirmed and contract is signed, there are basic tasks to prepare – scheduling venue, reserving hotel for speaker, securing helpers for lecture and sending out tickets to patrons,” Woodworth said.

There are many hopes for the Dillon Lecture Series in the future. The series tries to get guest speakers that will connect with all age groups. The series also hopes to continue to find guest speakers that delay a message that everyone can relate with.

“We hope to continue to bring interesting and engaging speakers, they may not always have a name you recognize, but maybe the you will recognize their story from their life experiences,” Woodworth said.

Weathers recalls near-death on Everest

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016

By Angela Lingg

Angela Lingg/Collegian - Mitch Boss, Newton, talks with Weathers, who lost his nose, right hand and most of his fingers on Mt.  Everest.

Angela Lingg/Collegian - Mitch Boss, Newton, talks with Weathers, who lost his nose, right hand and most of his fingers on Mt. Everest.

Moving across the stage, waving his ravaged left hand and one mechanical hand, Dr. Beck Weathers shared his story of survival with the audience at the Sports Arena.
At times, he whispered, and at other times he shouted. His voice shook with emotion as he told of the miracles that unfolded on that tragic day on Mount Everest.
Dennis Stoecklein was impressed with Weathers’ deliverance of the lecture. “He spoke for about an hour and five minutes with no notes and was very passionate about his message,” Stoecklein said.
On Feb. 16, Weathers was the first speaker in the 2016 Dillon Lecture Series. Weathers survived the shocking 1996 Everest disaster in which eight climbers lost their lives.
Twenty years ago this month, Weathers was training to climb the last of the seven summits — Mount Everest. On May 10, 1996, sometime around midnight, Weathers’ team began the final ascent to the summit. As the day went on, Weathers temporarily lost his eyesight, due to a prior, radial keratotomy eye surgery and the high altitude.
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Dillon Lecture

Sunday, January 31st, 2016

Beck Weathers

Title: Pathologist and mountaineer

Lecture date: 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 16 at the Sports Arena

Mt. Everest, which is 29,029 feet tall, has taken the lives of 275 people.

One of the deadliest times in Mount Everest’s history was May 10 and 11, 1996, when eight people lost their lives on the mountain.

From that deadly tragedy emerged a miraculous story of a survivor: Dr. Beck Weathers.

Now 20 years after the disaster, Weathers will be speaking at HCC.

In 1996, Weathers was part of a group of climbers who attempted to climb Everest.  On their way down, a blizzard hit and they were trapped near the top.

After being temporarily blinded by the high altitude and falling into a hypothermic coma, Weathers’ fellow climbers left him, thinking he was too far gone.

Weathers spent 15 hours exposed in the blizzard. Somehow, the next day, he awoke and managed to get to an upper camp by himself.

He later had part of his frostbitten right arm amputated, as well some fingers, parts of his feet and his nose.

Daniel Seddiqui thrives on workplace rejection

Sunday, November 29th, 2015

By Angela Lingg

Loribeth Reynolds/Collegian - Daniel Seddiqui speaks at the Sports Arena as part of the Dillion Lecture Series about adaptability and learning to accept rejection in the workplace.

Loribeth Reynolds/Collegian - Daniel Seddiqui speaks at the Sports Arena as part of the Dillion Lecture Series about adaptability and learning to accept rejection in the workplace.

Tall, handsome, with dark hair and a warm personality, Daniel Seddiqui looks like a man of success. Yet, he has been named by USA Today as the most rejected person in the world. After failing more than 40 consecutive job interviews, Seddiqui decided to chart his own course.

On Nov. 17, Seddiqui spoke at the Sports Arena as part of the Dillon Lecture Series. He recounted to the audience his experience of failing to find a job after he graduated college with a degree in economics.

“Those rejections that I faced after graduating college were a blessing in disguise,” Seddiqui said. “Failing 40 job interviews at the time was very tough emotionally.”

Through his failures, Seddiqui learned to accept rejection and not let it discourage him.
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Dillon Lecture

Sunday, February 8th, 2015

Robert Edsel, an author, will be speaking about his experiences documenting the rescue of historic treasures from the Nazis’ secret underground warehouses.

Robert Edsel Title: American businessman and author Lecture date: 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10 Where: Hutchinson Sports Arena

Robert Edsel

Edsel is known for his book, “The Monuments Men” which was turned into a 2014 motion picture.

Edsel was inspired to write the book while living in Europe. He had developed an appreciation for art and architecture there. He wondered how the great works of art were saved from the theft and devastation of World War II.

It took him 12 years to research the U.S. Army’s “monuments men,” the heroes who went into combat zones to save and preserve these cultural works, for the benefit of the world.

Robert Edsel

Title: American businessman and author

Lecture date: 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10

Where: Hutchinson Sports Arena