Rainbow Six Siege

May 3rd, 2018

In my recent article, I wrote about “Fortnite” I mentioned a game called “Rainbow Six Siege”, and I am here to persuade you to buy or rent the game.

R6 is a game where your objective is simply to win and it’s a 5 vs 5 shootout game with 40 operates. Operates are characters in the game with an ability allowing you to use in R6. The game was made by Ubisoft, a company who makes tons of other games, such as “Assassin’s Creed”, “Watch Dogs” and “Tom Clancy’s The Division”.

R6 came out in 2015, but I got the game in 2016 and have been playing it ever since and I would like to add that there is a game mode called “Ranked’ to see how good you are or how trash you are.

There are several different placements in R6 and it goes from copper (being the worst) and I refuse to play with anyone who is copper because it means you are trash.

The highest placement is diamond and I’ve only achieved platinum 2 because the season was going to end and I didn’t even bother trying to reach it.

And of course “Ranked” isn’t for everybody and there is another game mode called “Casual” which basically is where you are put in a match with people who are either ranked or not ranked and you don’t have to worry about your rank dropping. There are, however, 3 different types of game modes and those are: “Hostage”, “Team Death Match Bomb”, and “Secure the Area”.

I prefer to play, “TDM Bomb” and “Secure Area”, because I know what I am doing.

In conclusion, R6 is a very fun and strategically set game that will leave you on the edge of your seat.

Pablo

Softball sweeps Hesston

May 3rd, 2018

The Hutchinson Community College softball team began postseason play this past Saturday against Hesston College in a best-of-three game series.

However, three games wasn’t necessary, as the Blue Dragons swept the Larks, 6-2 and 7-6.

Hutchinson started the day off hot, scoring four runs in the first inning of the first game. This was largely due to a Raven Bass home run that scored three of the four runs.

D.J. Cannon sent the last run in thanks to her triple that was smashed to center field.

Hesston couldn’t get much going during game one. Through seven innings, the Larks scored two runs and only managed three hits.
The second game was much closer, but the Blue Dragons again used the first inning to put the Larks in a hole. With the Blue Dragons hitting well, and the Larks committing far too many errors, the score was 5-2 after just one inning in favor of Hutchinson.

Hesston made things interesting by outscoring Hutchinson 3-1 over the course of the next five innings. Tied going into the bottom of the seventh inning, the Blue Dragons managed to escape the Larks by scoring the necessary run.

After the sweep, the Blue Dragons are now 35-9 overall. Their next game in the Region 6 tournament will be against Coffeyville Community College at noon Saturday at Hummer Park in Topeka.

Lucas Barlow

The Unfortunate Events of Brenna- My post-grad spontaneous Texas experience

May 3rd, 2018

For my final unfortunate-events story of the semester, I have decided to share an experience that only my best friend Rachel and I would have ever experienced in the history of the world.

It was our spontaneous trip right after of high school graduation. We saved up enough money so that we could drive to the Gulf of Mexico.

It was two days after graduation. We had just gotten extra money from friends and relatives. Thank you to my family members for all of the gift cards!

The only things that Rachel and I decided upon before the trip were to go to Texas and through Waco. We also wanted to go to the beach because I had never been and on the way back, the plan was to see some of my family members in Texas and go to the Dr Pepper factory. Yes, I love Dr Pepper that much.

My mom once lived in Corpus Christi when my grandpa was in the navy. She loved it there and shared stories that made me want to go there.

Rachel and I left around 10 a.m. for Texas. She drove while I navigated. We went from Wichita through Oklahoma City and then Fort Worth and Dallas. When we finally got to Corpus Christi, it was 4 a.m. We didn’t want to waste money, so we decided not to stop earlier.

The only hotel that would accept 18-year olds was a Motel 6, so that’s where we stayed. That night, there was a rain storm, which we documented.

In the morning, we decided it would be fun to find a beach and go swim. It was still pretty cloudy and gloomy out from the storm, and when we found a beach area, it wasn’t really what I expected. It was kind of trashy and there weren’t many people there. It didn’t take us very long to realize we were at an unpopular beach, possibly not a beach at all.

We decided to swim anyways.

Oh and I should probably mention that I forgot to bring a swimsuit on this trip. I know … classic Brenna! Any way, I figured it all out and we went to the salty water that didn’t produce very big waves. It was just an off day.

The next thing that happened will forever scar Rachel and I. We were just swimming in the ocean, minding our own business, when out of nowhere we were hit with a wave. This was no ordinary wave. No siree, this wave was stinging the ever living crap out of us. We thought it was rocks and at first in so much shock that we didn’t even move. When it sunk in that in fact, some sea creatures were stinging us, we freaked out and sprinted, as fast as you can in the water, to the shore.

I looked down at my legs and arms being pinched all over and there were these tiny, clear, blobs. They started dying being out of the water and I started feeling short relief, but they were everywhere, and I do mean everywhere.

I drove us back to the hotel where we washed the gross things off of us. Turns out they were baby jellyfish. I went in thinking I might get attacked and eaten by a shark and ended up getting shocked by jellyfish. Perfect …

On the bright side, Rachel and I still had a good time despite the many incidents that happened on the trip that would take more than a single column to write about and gave us a great story to tell our families.

Brenna

The Entertainment Pulse: The top three young adult novels that need a film adaption

April 27th, 2018

By Jack Greenwood
Columnist

There was a time when young-adult novels were box-office titans.
From “Harry Potter” to “Twilight” and “The Hunger Games”, these movies all dominated the film industry. Yet, the trend seems to be slowing down as young-adult novels have generated less and less revenue.
This week, I’ve chosen three young-adult novels that have yet to become big screen films, but might save the young-adult genre.
3. “The 39 Clues”
If you ever went to a book fair in elementary school, there’s a good chance you know this book series. Written by a different author with each book, the series follows a young sibling duo of Amy and Dan Cahill as they race around the world, solving puzzles and unlocking mysteries regarding their family’s secret history. Their entire family is divided into four separate houses, all competing against one another to find the treasure at the end of the mystery. Along the way, murder, stealing and heists, all make this series exciting to an audience of all ages.
2. “Among the Hidden”
What if it was illegal just to be alive? In this series, author Margaret Peterson Haddix creates a dystopian world showing us a drought and food crisis. As a result, a government illegalizes having more than two children, forcing kids like Luke Garner, into hiding and being referred to as a “shadow child.” This series of seven books seems like it could be a box office win (or a smash Netflix series) and fits right in with its dystopian themes.
1. “The Bar Code Tattoo”
“The bar code tattoo. Everybody’s getting it. It will make your life easier, they say. It will hook you in. It will become your identity.” Perhaps giving us a look into the not so distant future, author Suzanne Weyn paints the story of a bar code tattoo, a marking on your skin that allows you to purchase things, and get access to certain places. But what happens if you say no? Is it just a form of control? What else does the bar code tattoo do? These are the questions that lead Kayla’s mindset in the novel as she escapes her home to avoid the tattoo. This series is full of suspense and fear and should fill any movie theater with a huge audience.

Who’s who recognize hard working students

April 26th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

The Who’s Who Among Students national organization is conducting a strategic review, and the organization did not accept nominations this year. This could be a reason why some colleges have stopped supporting this program or have not recognized their students.

However, Hutchinson Community College continues to have this program, led by Academic Affairs and Curriculum/Program Improvement Coordinator Ryan Diehl.

“We wanted to find a way to continue to recognize our students, which led to the decision to create Who’s Who among Students at Hutchinson Community College,” Diehl said.

Wednesday, the Who’s Who among Students at Hutchinson Community College ceremony was at the Stringer Fine Arts Gallery Theatre.

Diehl has been the organizer for Who’s Who among Students at Hutchinson Community College since 2009, with other co-chairs.

Each year, Diehl and other faculty members recognize a variety of students that achieve academic excellence.

According to Diehl, these students need to meet particular criteria to be considered as a candidate.

“My involvement started somewhat by accident,” Diehl said.

Before, the coordinators for the event were Ila Stone and Pat Bryant. When Stone retired in 2008, Bryant was searching for another helper. Diehl happened to be in the office next to Bryant, and the rest fell into place.

Since then, she retired and others have continued to help Diehl keep the tradition going.

“During my undergraduate years, I coordinated the event for several years thanks to an organization on campus in which I was I was involved overseeing it,” Diehl said. “Pat’s invitation to take part was a way to continue that work.”

Diehl also said why he enjoys his involvement with the Who’s Who ceremony.

“It’s a great way to recognize many amazing students who have accomplished great things while here at HutchCC,” Diehl said. “I thoroughly enjoy getting to learn about the students when I am crafting the mini-biographies that are read about each of the recipients, as well as meet them at the event.”

Katie Reisinger, Havensville freshman, was one of 34 honorees for this ceremony.

“When I got the email that I was nominated, I was really surprised, especially when I saw the list of people nominated along with me,” Reisinger said. “I was thinking I must have done something really good to be a part of this.”

At the ceremony, Reisinger said that she heard about other students and their involvement on and off campus. “There was a short biography read for each of the honorees by faculty members,” Reisinger said. “A faculty member nominates a student they see as an academic leader.”

That was how Reisinger found out she was nominated. One of her teachers saw her around the community and knew she had already been on a leadership scholarship. Reisinger also filled up her community service hours before she came to the college and still joined Circle K, the community service club on campus.

According to the faculty member, Reisinger also showed hard workmanship and dedication in her studies, and in Symphonic and Pep Band.

Another student picked for the Who’s Who was Nathan Light, Wichita sophomore.

“The ceremony was very exciting, and I felt very grateful to have the pleasure to attend,” Light said. “I felt very honored once I found out I was nominated, and have always been told that my hard work would pay off eventually.”

Light is a member of the sports video team and the budget coordinator for the A/V Club.

When asked why it is important that the college continues the Who’s Who event, Light said, “To help give exposure and recognize the most hard working people here at HCC.”

To make the event better in the future, Light suggests getting the word out more.

“I think we deserve to have asterisks by our name at graduation or be able to wear something there that recognizes who we are and what the program is,” Light said.

The students can be nominated by either faculty or advisors. Then all nominations were reviewed by the Who’s Who Selection Committee

  1. Student must be full time (carrying 12 credit hours or more) and be of sophomore standing (have accumulated 27 or more credit hours).
  2. Student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
  3. Student must be active in at least one campus or
    community activity.

This Year’s Students Being Honored:

Rachel Adamyk
Ian Allen
Merissa Anderson
Devonte Bandoo
Kayla Barber
McKenzey Bell
Antwan Benjamin
Andrew Bleything
Sophia Bowman
Brianna Bradshaw
Victoria Coopman
Alexis Cruz
Matthew Denholm
Austin Engler
Kayli Esser
Joshua Freeman
Patricia Garcia
Kody Herrman
Isaac Hubbell
Storey Jackson
Abigail Jackson
Tyler Korb
Sarah Lewis
Mckenzie Lewis
Nathan Light
Megan Maness
Jayde Miyamoto
John (Thomas) Nelson
Yadira Nunez
Benjamin Pankratz
Tyler Pauly
Kameron Pope
Katelyn Reisinger
Jeffrey “JJ” Rhymes
Hannah Schriner
Allison Schweizer
Peyton Strobel
Megan Tammen
Trey Teeter
Lane Wiens

 

 

Golf team heading back to national tournament

April 26th, 2018

By The Collegian staff

The Hutchinson Community College men’s golf team did it again.

For the 18th straight year, the Blue Dragons have qualified for the NJCAA National Tournament. They made it after finishing fourth in a rugged District 3 Championship Monday and Tuesday at Sand Creek Station in Newton.

The top four teams qualified, and District 3 is often one of the nation’s toughest. This year was no exception, as top-ranked Indian Hills, Iowa won the district title with a 39-under-par 825. Finishing second was seventh-ranked Dodge City, 27 stokes back. In third was fifth-ranked Iowa Western with an 861. Ninth-ranked Hutchinson was isolated in fourth, 11 shots behind Iowa Western but 19 ahead of fifth-place and 14th-ranked Barton.

HutchCC sophomore Doug Rios-Ceballos was seventh overall with a 2-under 214. He finished third among the Region 6 teams.

The national tournament will be May 15-18 in Lubbock, Texas.

EMS teacher retires and gives insight on his teaching in the field

April 26th, 2018

Dan Jones is a Hutchinson Community College Emergency Medical Service advisor and has been helping out

Jones has worked at the college for more than 20 years, teaching even as he continued to work in hospitals and with patients.

“I was ready for a change in that point in my life, and so I become a clinical coordinator, and so I would go around Wichita, Salina and Hutch and take students to their clinical settings in the hospital, because that was my area of expertise,” Jones said. “Then I got interested in the classroom, I got my instructor license, in the state to teach in. I got that in 1986, and so I kind of liked going in the classroom, and that was around 2000.

Jones said he worked in the Emergency Medical Technician field, and EMS was the embodiment of medical.

“Doing it on the wing and a prayer, and you don’t have the doctors and the people in the field to help you, and I thought it was interesting,” Jones said. “EMS is more of a specialty area, a jack-of-all-trades. They were the specialty in the crisis situation, so I was always thought that was interesting within EMS.

Jones said he had a lot of students through the years, and he had to change his approach on how kids learned. He said it was a challenge at times, that’s one reason why he wanted to retire.

“It’s getting harder, all the changes, one thing in especially in EMS and medicine and education is that there’s change, and it’s getting a bit harder on the change. I still go with the flow, but it’s been an interesting 23 years at the college. I’ve had different roles, but my favorite would be the classroom.”

Not to say the classroom was easy, but Jones said it was rewarding.

“I’ve had kids with challenges, and they overcome the challenges to get through, and you knew that they wouldn’t be a paramedic. They knew their spot, and would be a good EMT. With specific ones – there have been too many to pick out – but I had one and you could tell she was smart, and it went in the classroom socially inept, and through the class, she really came a long way, and I’ve helped her along the way with that. She’s a paramedic now, and there was a time where I thought I don’t know if she was going to make it or not. But if it’s something I learned, it’s not to give up too early.”

Baseball keeps up offensive tear; softball finishes regular season with easy sweep

April 26th, 2018

By Lucas Barlow
Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College baseball team won its ninth-straight game, after the Blue Dragons easily handled Pratt Community College in two games last Sunday.

The Blue Dragons outscored the Beavers 38-12, as they won 18-8 in game one, and 20-4 in game two. That’s also Hutchinson’s 18th-straight win over Pratt, dating back to the 2014 season.

Freshman Dylan Nedved tied two Blue Dragon single-game records that day. He tied the school record for total bases in a single game with 12. Nedved also scored four runs in game two, which ties the single-game school record.

Sophomore Julian Rip also had himself a day, as he cranked three doubles in game one. That also ties a Blue Dragon single-game record.

This is now the fifth-straight season that the Blue Dragons have reached 30 wins, and is the 25th time in program history.

Hutchinson is now 31-17 overall and 17-11 in the Jayhawk West conference. The Blue Dragons are only one game behind Butler Community College for second place.

Softball – The Blue Dragons sophomores finished the regular season in style, pounding the Bethany junior varsity 21-0 and 14-0 on Tuesday at Fun Valley Sports Complex.

Sophomore Raven Bass belted three home runs in the first game, as HutchCC set a single-game record with seven home runs.

The Blue Dragons smashed three more home runs in the second game, with Natalie Semmel smacked two more home runs, including a grand slam.

The sophomore class have won 71 percent of their games so far, going into this weekend’s Region 6 first-round best-of-three series against Hesston at Fun Valley. They also combined for a 3.54 GPA.

Badinage vocal jazz earns international award

April 26th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

Badinage, the prestigious vocal jazz group of Hutchinson Community College, has wrapped up their year with international recognition after being awarded the Downbeat 41st Annual Student Music Award for large group vocal jazz ensemble.

Downbeat Magazine has covered only the best jazz performers since its beginning in 1934. The award, though well-deserved, came as a pleasant surprise to Director Neal Allsup, who decided to submit the group’s work for the first time this year.

“Badinage has not missed a man-hour of rehearsal in 23 years,” Allsup said. “If they’re ill, they still want to come in and sit in the corner and rehearse. That’s how dedicated they are to their craft and to be able to produce a product that is worthy of a Downbeat award. We’ve had seven Carnegie Hall performances and we’ve been to JEN in the past. It’s not like we’ve all of a sudden made it. The awards we’ve got this year really are on the backs of all those wonderful, incredible students I’ve had over the last 20, 30 years.”

Each member of Badinage will receive a certificate to recognize their accomplishments. The group will also be featured in the June edition of the magazine, alongside several of the top jazz schools in the world.

“This award really is about the program,” Allsup said. “We’ve been doing this for over 20 years. It’s just that this year there has been a lot of opportunity and a lot of things that have come our way.”

In the future, Allsup plans to enter the group for more Downbeat categories including small group and ensembles.

However, Allsup emphasizes that it’s not just this year’s group that should be proud of the award. He believes that each group’s talent continues to shine through year-to-year.

“These vocal jazz singers, especially Badinage, they’ve been cranking it out like this for more than 20 years,” Allsup said. “This year we had a vocal jazz reunion inviting back students from the last thirty years to come to campus and we spent a whole weekend just remembering and rehearsing for a concert.”

Allsup said he hopes to host another vocal jazz reunion in another five years.

Badinage was also invited to perform at the most important international conference, The Jazz Educators Network, in Dallas, where only six schools are chosen to perform.

Only a few high schools in Kansas offer vocal jazz classes, so for most students, HutchCC is their first experience with the genre.

Next year, every member of Badinage is expected to return along with any incoming freshmen who make the cut.

“We may have to start a third group,” Allsup said. “My job is to go out and find outstanding musicianship.”

Students interested in joining are encouraged to audition, where, if they make the cut, will then be placed in either Badinage, or Allsup’s other equally-talented group, Sonance.

The group performs two major concerts at the college each semester, in addition to smaller performances at nursing homes and hospitals in the community.

“Next week we will go to a dementia and Alzheimer’s unit, and we’ll sit in a great big circle with them to sing,” Allsup said. “It’s one of the most touching and memorable performances.”

Badinage also travels to one conference each year, although they are often invited to perform at many other places across nation and world.

“We’ve had invitations to sing at festivals in Monteux, Switzerland, Cuba, Brazil, Japan,” Allsup said. “It’s amazing the kind of invitations we receive.”

Many of those invitations must be turned down but, with the new international recognition from Downbeat, the group will likely be flooded with additional attention.

The group’s work doesn’t end there. They also open for professional groups at the local Fox Theatre.

“Badinage came back early from Spring Break to open for ten-time Grammy winning group, Manhattan Transfer,” Allsup said.

Manhattan Transfer, the multi-Grammy winning jazz group that has been performing since 1969, was in awe of HutchCC’s badinage group, Allsup said.

The group also recently released a new song which, although the sheet music will not likely be available for several years, Badinage students worked hard to transcribe the song for their own performance.

“We’re the best kept secret in the town,” Allsup said.

For anyone interested in donating to the group or receiving an album of some of Badinage’s work, they can contact Neal Allsup in Stringer Fine Art’s Center.

Looking to transfer? Lau knows how

April 26th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Staff writer

The sun is finally out, the weather is getting warmer, and that can only mean one thing. Summer.

But, there are some things to be accomplished before summer officially begins. For many Hutchinson Community College students that means preparing for their next journey – transferring to another college.

Many students are already stressed with finals around the corner that transferring is on the back burner. Transferring can be stressful, because potential transfers may not know where to start. Not to worry. HutchCC’s very own coordinator of advising, Christopher Lau, answered some questions that students might have.

Q: What should HutchCC students planning to transfer this fall get done now? By May? By June?

A: At this point, there are several things that a transfer student would have already completed – visiting the transfer school, applying for admission and being accepted, completing the FAFSA and any scholarship applications, etc. So, at this point, the transfer student would need to finish strong and do well on his or her classes for the remainder of this semester. After graduation, the student will want to send an official transcript with all courses completed to the transfer school through the National Student Clearinghouse.

There is a link available to do this through DragonZone. For more information, students can visit http://www.hutchcc.edu/administration/records/transcript-request.

Next, during the summer, the student may be required to attend an orientation or transition event at the university.

Q: What should students who want to transfer this fall but aren’t sure where to transfer know?

A: Get in contact with your advisor now. While it may not be too late to transfer to a university, some universities have already awarded transfer scholarships and there may not be scholarship funding available.

Q: What resources are available at HutchCC to figure out the right school to transfer to?

A: If a student is undecided, he or she can talk with his or her advisor about colleges and universities in Kansas, the difference between private and public universities, which transfer schools offer the program a student is interested in, etc.

The Student Success Center in the Parker Student Union maintains a small transfer resource area with information from various transfer schools. Finally, many colleges and universities set up tables in high-traffic buildings on campus where students can ask questions of admissions representatives.

In addition to applying, being accepted, completing your FAFSA, and keeping up your current grades there is still more to be done. Students want to make sure that school they are transferring is the right school for them. One way to do this to go on a campus visit.

Chad Steinkamp, assistant Director of Admissions at Wichita State University said, “A campus visit can be a huge determining factor on where a student goes to school. It really can make or break your decision. Also, it is a great way to get additional information about campus that you might not already know.”

Moving to a new city, or even state can be intimidating. Especially coming for a community college, moving to a state college might me a big change for some students.

“When transferring to a state college there will be a few more people around and, in your classes, compared to community college but there are also many opportunities to get involved and meet new people,” Steinkamp said. “The last two or three years of college is really the time where you make the big decisions on what your career goals are, and WSU and other state schools can help you with that.”

However, there is one last thing to consider when transferring schools, and that is how do your classes transfer? The last thing anyone wants at this point is to have paid for classes that do not transfer the way you want them to.

For those students transferring to Wichita State University, they have a new transfer portal.

“The portal is called the transfer gateway and students can get to it by going to www.wichita.edu/transfergateway,” Steinkamp said. “Transfer students can put in all their classes they have taken at Hutch CC or about to take and the gateway will show them how it will transfer to us and how many credits they have left to get their degree with us.”

Students who are unable to decided were to transfer from should explore all their options.