Archive for the ‘Top Story’ Category

Spooky Legends: Local library lore

Friday, October 19th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor In Chief

Those who have been to the Hutchinson Public Library may not know that there is an interesting history right in front of them.

Some have noticed when Google searching, “Most haunted places in Kansas”, that the public library usually appears at the top of the list.

From library employees to patrons, many people have claimed to encounter the ghost of a librarian named Ida Miranda Day-Holzapfel, who was one of the first librarians at the Main Street location and worked all over Kansas in several different libraries. Kate Lewis, who works as Marketing and Communications at the library, researched Ida Day and found a lot of new information that most never knew, and sent it to Reno County Museum.

Lewis said that Ida Day had unfinished business at the library and believes that the high electromagnetic field in the basement explains why she seems to be most active in there.

Lewis said that Ida Day was born in Colony in 1888 and was hired at Hutchinson Public Library, then located at 5th and Main Street – now the Union Labor Temple – in 1916 at the age of 28 after being a teacher in Colony and Iola. She made $75 a month and was given a two-weeks paid vacation.

In 1917, during the library remodeling, “Ida and her assistants cataloged and classified every book, a thing which was never done before,” Lewis said, “One of the best ideas which Miss Day has inaugurated into the system of management is the perfection of the reference arrangements.”

Lewis also said that Ida helped people look up any number of books. Ida also mounted and classified 3,000 pictures during this time.

One of Miss Day’s many achievements was sending books out to soldiers during WWI in 1918.

Ida Day was library director from 1916-1925.

In 1925, Ida took a leave of absence for a year to study at the University of Kansas. In 1926, Ida resigned.

Ida was married at the age of 52 to John Holzapfel, in 1940.

In 1946, Ida returned to the library, and there had been plans for another remodel since the population doubled. They wound up building a new library, which is where it is now. Ida even wrote an article for the Library Journal in 1949, which was titled, “Hutchinson Builds Modern Library”, where she described the modernization that was taking place and even included blueprints for the new library.

Ida yet again served as Library Director of the Hutchinson Public Library from 1946-1954

Her husband died in 1948, the same year her sister, Sarah Elizabeth Mather, died.

On Feb. 1, 1954 Ida resigned from the public library and prepared herself to become head of the catalog department at the Tulare County library system in Visalia, Calif. on March 1.

“A wish to be relieved from the administrative duties prompted the change,” Holzapfel said.

She was going to keep her home in Hutchinson at 430 East 12th, which is one of the student/faculty parking lots of Hutchinson Community College.

Ida Day died from a fatal car accident in California at the age of 65.

Lewis was one who has experienced unexplainable things in the library, one of which was when she first was given a tour of the basement and got chills where she felt the hair on her head stand up.

Another experience was while taking photographs with her 7-year old daughter for a stuffed animal sleepover program.

“She doesn’t know about the library ghost,” Lewis said. “I didn’t want her to be scared of the library.”

They walked to the location where the Children’s Services supplies are, which include puppets and paper-mache sculptures in the oldest area of the building built in 1951.

“I thought my daughter would be fascinated,” Lewis said, “Instead, she instantly said that she didn’t like the room and that it felt scary.”

Lewis also said that her daughter didn’t want her to take pictures of the animals and just wanted them to get out of there.

The Hutchinson Public Library Business Manager, Tina Stropes, had a strange encounter with Ida Day about 15 years ago, in 2003. Stropes was working on payroll, adding up timesheets when her calculator started printing “0.00” repeatedly.

“We decided that it was Ida Day wanting to get paid, but she didn’t work any hours,” Stropes said.

That isn’t all that happened, because the next month of doing payroll, Stropes’ calculator did the same thing and she told Ida that she wasn’t working any hours so she wasn’t getting paid and the calculator stopped.

There were other experiences, such as visitors being poked and no one would be there, and some had feelings of being watched.

Whether a believer of ghosts or not, the Hutchinson Public Library is a historical building with an interesting past and is worth the visit to many.

Overcoming adversity: ‘Breaking Bad’ actor R.J. Mitte speaks about overcoming challenges in his life

Friday, October 5th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Collegian Editor-In-Chief

When a child is asked what they want to be when they grow up, they hardly ever say sitting in an office all day or doing something they aren’t fond of. Instead they say they want to be a doctor, firefighter, singer, or even an actor/actress. The limits have seemed to change for college students who once had those dreams themselves.

Twenty-six-year-old actor, model, and cerebral palsy activist, R.J Mitte who spoke at the Ray and Stella Dillon Lecture Series on Tuesday Oct. 2 at the Sports Arena, explains that no one should limit themselves on what they can or can’t do. Mitte spoke about struggles he has faced with the condition and stressed the thought, “Can’t is a decision, and a mindset.”

Mitte is most known for roles in television shows, the main one being Walter White Jr. on AMC’s hit show “Breaking Bad”, who has cerebral palsy, same as Mitte, except in reality, Mitte’s condition is milder, so he had to slow his speech and learn to walk with crutches for the show.

Mitte, like others with CP, was born with the disorder where the brain lacks the appropriate amount of oxygen.  Mitte is also known for characters he played in “Switched at Birth”, “Weeds”, “Vegas”, and even acted in “Hannah Montana” and “Everybody Hates Chris”.

Still acting, Mitte helps with several charities on the side, such as Shriners Hospitals for Children, Special Olympics, ALS Associations, and many more organizations dedicated to helping others.

Mitte was born and raised in Lafayette, Louisiana. From age 3-13, his mother took him to Shriners Hospital for many types of therapy and braces. Mitte was a “severe toe walker and his feet bent downwards, so he walked on the tips of his toes, so he had to go through a lot of physical therapy. During his lecture, Mitte described the casts he had to wear and shared about sticking frozen coins in them during the hot summer to cool his legs.

Despite his optimism, growing up with the disorder had its challenges. Even though Mitte participated in normal childhood activities like soccer and riding dirt bikes, he explained what it was like with bullies.

“People with disabilities don’t want to be labeled as disabled,” Mitte said.

He also explained how a lot of people stand by while bullying takes place.

“If you see something, say something,” Mitte said. “Everyone has the ‘someone else will take care of it’ mentality and we need to break it.”

Mitte followed that thought with a story involving a blind man on the same plane as him recently. The man was in need of assistance, according to Mitte, and got lost trying to figure out where he was going. Mitte decided to step up and guide the man, even though he was a stranger and several people were watching the blind man struggle, yet Mitte was the only one that took initiative.

From a young age, Mitte learned the importance of self-worth. His grandfather pushed the philosophy of “Can’t say can’t” and the idea stuck with him. When answering his grandpa, Mitte had two options, “Yes”, or “I wasn’t in the room, or didn’t hear you.”

His grandfather showed him that even though people told Mitte he couldn’t do specific things, that it was their decision, not his and wanted him to be the best he could be.

Mitte not only faced his own obstacles, but his family’s as well. When he was 12-and-a-half years old, Mitte’s mother was in a car accident that partially paralyzed her for seven years. His grandfather also suffered a stroke that left him fully paralyzed on the left side.

“Without challenges, where would we be in our lives?” Mitte said. “It’s those challenges that shape us.”

In 2006 Mitte’s family moved to California to support his sister, Lacianne, while she was trying out for an acting opportunity. That was also the time, Mitte was recognized and started going to acting classes just for fun and to meet kids his own age. Before he knew it, Mitte was pushed into the entertainment industry, or as he called it, “The Mob”.

The main focus of Mitte’s speech was to not limit yourself to the small things, but instead reach as far as you can, and then even further.

“It’s up to you how far you want to reach,” Mitte said. “Step out of your realm of comfort.”

When asked earlier in the press conference what the overall message would be to the Hutchinson Community College students, Mitte said, “Protect your brand and image, you are cultivating your business, jobs look at you as an individual on social media and what you represent.”

Mitte also wanted to inform students that being aware of who they are and not being afraid to show people their true self is important.

“The people around you set your tone, if you don’t stand up for something, then who will?,” Mitte said. “We only get one chance to show people who and what we are, so stand up for what you believe in, what we believe is all we have.”

 

 

Let’s get political: 2018 midterms

Friday, October 5th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

With midterm elections coming up on Nov. 6, it’s more important than ever to make your voice heard.

There are so many reasons why it’s important to vote, especially as a college student. This generation has the ability to shift the political balance, either way, if they would go to the polls.

Many students are disengaged from political issues, usually because of a distrust in the government or the feeling that their vote doesn’t really matter.

The votes of students are incredibly important. This generation will be the ones to live with whatever changes are made in our government. So, in an attempt to gain some interest before the registration deadline on Oct. 16th, here is a brief summarization of what a few candidates, who will be on the local ballots, stand for.

Kris Kobach (Republican Gubernatorial Candidate):

Education
Direct more money into teacher pay, book, etc.
Develop partnerships with trade schools

Welfare Reform
Provide hand up to less fortunate, not handouts
End welfare fraud and abuse
Create economic environment with high-paying jobs

Government
Enact term limits
Capping property tax appraisals
Low-tax and low regulation policies

Illegal Immigration
End in-state tuition for illegal immigrants
Stop providing welfare for illegal immigrants

Life
Protect, preserve, ensure culture of life in Kansas
Safeguard human life from conception to natural death

2nd Amendment
Safeguard right to bear arms
Preserve concealed carry

Laura Kelly (Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate):

Education
Invest in higher education, technical schools and job training programs
Fund K-12 Schools
Improve Student Mental Health

Economics
Support new industry that leverages our state’s strengths
Encourage rural growth and prosperity
Prioritize investment in Infrastructure

Government
Restore public confidence in Kansas government
Reinstating the Equal Protection for State Workers
Reversing the Adoption Discrimination Bill

Healthcare
Expand Medicaid
Reform KanCare (People over Profit)
Protect Women’s Reproductive Rights

Public Safety
Passing common sense gun legislation
Funding Public Safety

Paul Waggoner (Republican Representative of 104th District):

Education
Bring school financing to the vote of the people
More school choices for underprivileged students

Economics
Remove unnecessary regulations
Make Kansas a desirable place to start a business

Government
Reformation of Kansas Supreme Court Judge selection
Push for governmental transparency

Healthcare
Against Medicaid Expansion
Sanctity of Life and protection of the unborn

Civil Freedoms
Freedom of religious liberty and conscious rights
Freedom of self-defense/right to bear arms

Jason Probst (Democratic Representative of 102nd District and Hutchinson Community College alumus):

Economics
Create good climate for established local business
Find innovative ways to create jobs for neighborhoods
Make Hutchinson a great place to live, work, and start a business

Education
Adequately and equitably fund children’s education
Explore new teaching ideas that benefit students
Work with urban, suburban, and rural districts

Government
Elected Officials must listen to residents
tax policy must be fair and widely spread across the state’s residents
Redistricting must be handled by bipartisan committee

Healthcare
Medicaid expansion would have provided healthcare to 150,000 Kansans
Veto of the bill was “morally repugnant”
Expand Medicaid for families who can’t afford/employer doesn’t cover

Protecting Children
Programs designed to give children safe and stable environment
Investments will produce the next generation of Kansans
Take time now to help children so they prepared for the future

Championship aspirations: Football team improves to 5-1 again

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College football team is off to a hot start again this season.

The Blue Dragons are sitting at 5-1 after a big win over Butler Community College on Saturday night at Gowans Stadium. This 5-1 start might look familiar to some folks, as the Blue Dragons started 5-1 during the 2017 season as well.

Although the 2017 Blue Dragons started 5-1, they eventually went down a rocky path. Out of the last six games the football team played last year, they only won two games and finished 7-5. The team hopes to avoid a slide like that again this year.

Blue Dragons coach Rion Rhoades is more optimistic about this year’s finish. The character of the football team is better than it has been in years’ past. The team also seems to be more prepared and there seems to be more trust between the players and coaches as well.

The team is also still relatively healthy, compared to last year’s team, which lost five of their top 12 offensive linemen. As the season continues, the team hopes to remain healthy and keep their attention on the game.

“Our focus is to just continue to get better at what we do. Getting off to a good start is proven to be an important thing for us. We’ve just played a lot better when we get out of the shoot and score some points right off the bat and get some stops,” Rhoades said.

With only five regular season games left, starting with Saturday’s homecoming game against Highland at Gowans Stadium, the Blue Dragons must continue to work hard.

Leading the way is freshman quarterback Mason Schucker. Schucker, a true freshman from Searcy, Arkansas, is currently tied for first in the Jayhawk Conference with 10 touchdown passes. He has just three interceptions.

“Everybody on the team is excited about being 5-1,” Schucker said. “They know we have a good shot of finishing out the rest of the season really well. We know that it could lead to bigger things as well and everybody’s just really excited to play each week, each game and get out there and practice and get better every day.”

Life in the fast Lane: HutchCC soccer coach reaches milestone win

Friday, September 28th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

Hutchinson Community College head soccer coach Sammy Lane recently reached a milestone in his career.

Lane and the HutchCC women’s soccer team defeated Pratt Community College on Saturday 2-0, earning Lane his 200th win as Blue Dragons coach. Lane, the only coach in team history, has worked hard over the years to create a name for the women’s soccer team, and his hard work is paying off.

For Lane, the best thing about reaching 200 wins was the messages he received.

“The wins mean an awful lot, but to get the messages from some of the girls was really touching,” Lane said. Here’s a sampling of what former players had to say to Lane after Saturday’s win, via social media or text messaging.

“Congrats on the 200th win Sammy! So thankful I could be a part of your success at Hutch! Thanks for teaching me everything you know! Miss playing for you” – Jordan Downing, HutchCC, 2015-2016, text message

“Thanks for always believing in me and having my back!! Happy to be playing and doing well but always a Blue Drag at heart!!” – Dayna Johnson, 2015-2016, text message

“I wouldn’t have got to where I am today without you” – Ashley Burnett, 2009-2010, and current PrattCC coach, text message

“He is one of a kind, the kind that always teaches us life is n’t always easy but we’re going to have to face it anyway. This coach helped me succeed in many ways, on and off the field. Congrats on your 200 wins, nobody deserves it more!” – Chloe Flynn, 2016- 2017, Twitter

“Huge congrats on 200 wins!! Thanks for pushing me to my absolute limits and making me a better person on and off the field. Never thought I would say I miss you yelling at me for laughing all the time :/ You deserve this !” – Meagan Grantham, 2016-2017, Twitter

“Best coach I’ve ever had. Hands down. Taught me a lot of valuable lessons.” – Adriene (Similton) Engstrom, 2005-2006, Facebook

“Congrats! I can still remember you yelling down the sideline ‘come on you old Pollock.’” – Jenny Mossman, 2005-2006, Facebook

All-Time Blue Dragon Coaches 200-Win Club
Jaime Rose, softball, 413
Ronda Shirley, volleyball, 347
John Ontjes, women’s basketball, 314
John Burgi, baseball, 314
Kyle Crookes, baseball, 292
Steve Eck, men’s basketball, 260
Charles Sesher, men’s basketball, 259
Becky Endicott, volleyball, 237
Becky Endicott, softball, 236
Ryan Schmidt, baseball, 221
Sammy Lane, soccer, 200

Next Friday (and every Friday) is Hawaiian shirt day.

Friday, September 28th, 2018

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

For those who are unaware, for the last four weeks, there has been a few students at Hutchinson Community College that partake in coordinating outfits.

Every Friday, a handful of Dan Smith’s engineering physics students collectively wear Hawaiian shirts.

What a way to make classes interesting.

Wyatt Krehbiel, Pretty Prairie sophomore, explained how this movement originally came about.

Krehbiel said that it had originally started off as a joke, but that it just escalated quickly. Soon the students had even got Smith to join in on the fun. He then goes on to explain why they wear them:

“A – Hawaiian shirts are awesome. B – We gotta start celebrating the weekend early,” he said.

As the weeks go by, they try to tell random people they meet around campus that every Friday is “Hawaiian Shirt Friday”, and that they need to partake. Krehbiel also jokes that it happens to be his “charismatic nature” that helps get more people to join.

One has to ask, does this have anything to do with Bill Lumbergh and the movie “Office Space”? Or just something they came up with on a whim?

Krehbiel said that he gets asked that a lot, but he has never even seen the movie.

They plan to continue wearing the shirts for the remainder of the first semester and possibly into the second.

When asked how he would feel if more people around campus started wearing Hawaiian shirts, Krehbiel said, “It would be absolutely awesome. I would love to be able to unite an entire college in the most ridiculous way possible.”

So dig out that old typical Hawaiian tourist shirt from high school spirit week, and dust that bad boy off before this next Friday so you too can enjoy the ridiculous fun these guys have.

Sleep-deprived studentzzzz

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

The lack of sleep affects not only educational success, but physical safety as well. Without the right amount of rest, people are at risk of multiple health issues. Exhaustion can even lead to dangerous situations if not dealt with proactively.

Many students are quickly nearing a downhill slide toward poor health and physical harm. It’s time for them to take an active role in their own sleep habits.

Students don’t always make the best decisions when it comes to their sleep habits. Late night studying, among other things, is one of the biggest factors in these habits. Some students don’t even get to bed until early morning.

Jon Reed, a HutchCC freshman from Hutchinson, says he usually doesn’t get to bed until 2 a.m., and wakes up around 6 a.m. That’s only four hours of sleep.

“I feel like s— when I wake up. Usually have to drink enormous amounts of coffee to get through the day,” Reed said.

Bralen Martin, a Hutchinson sophomore, follows a somewhat similar routine. Usually he’s in bed around 3 a.m. in the morning and up by 9 a.m.

While that’s a bit better, six hours is still not nearly enough to function properly throughout the day. Does he really feel like he is getting enough sleep?

“Sort of. I feel tired in the mornings, but usually wake up as the day goes by,” Martin said.

While “sort of” is better than not, it still goes to show that students aren’t getting enough rest. This can lead to some pretty scary incidents.

“One time I almost fell asleep while driving,” Reed said. “I started to swerve, but caught myself just in time.”

Falling asleep at the wheel is a serious problem, not just for the driver, but for anyone else on the road.

Sleep deprivation can cause lasting health issues as well, both mentally and physically.

Students who get less than seven hours of sleep are more susceptible to anxiety and depression. They are also at risk of weight gain or weight loss, increased blood pressure, and extreme irritability

Lasting effects include hypertension, diabetes and heart problems.

Students should work on prioritizing work and play, as well as designating a specific sleep schedule to keep them on track. It only takes a few weeks to set an internal clock.

Sleep is a necessity for everyone, especially young students. Sleep deprivation won’t just affect grades, but cause lasting health concerns.

Marvelous Moeder: Hutch native one of conference’s top goal scorers

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Brailey Moeder scores on a penalty kick against Barton.

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

Hutchinson Community College soccer player Brailey Moeder is not your average player.

She was a former Hutchinson High School standout and came to play soccer at HutchCC under coach Sammy Lane. Moeder was not always a standout soccer player, though. Throughout high school, Moeder worked hard and showed her coaches what a talented player she is. Now, as a sophomore forward for HutchCC, Moeder is one of the top forwards and goal scorers in the Jayhawk West Conference.

As Moeder’s sophomore year of college rolled around, she continued to standout. Out of the first six games the women’s soccer team has played this season, Brailey started in five of them. In those six games, she scored six goals, with two of them being a game winning goal. She has six assists and made one penalty kick, tying the game against Barton in a thrilling 3-3 tie.

Moeder has been a key player in the soccer’s team success this season and Lane has noticed.

“Brailey has stepped up for us,” Lane said, “I admire that.”

There is one game, in particular, where Moeder has stepped up the most. When the Blue Dragons played Barton Community College in early September, Brailey had a standout game.  Late in the game, with the soccer team trailing 3-2, the Blue Dragons were awarded a penalty kick, and Moeder was the brave soul who decided to take the shot.

Moeder ended up scoring the goal, tying the game against Barton.

“It gave me chills, to be honest. It was a lot of pressure and it was amazing,” Moeder said.

Throughout the years, Moeder has improved tremendously as a soccer player, but not without a little hard work. For Moeder, it was nice to finally see that hard work pay off saying, “There’s always room for improvement. I’m not just going to settle for what I thought was a good goal. That’s not me, I want to be better than that.”

Moeder has worked hard throughout the years to become the soccer player she is today. The results are something that Brailey is pleased with and hopes to see more of in the future.

Student/Instructor communication (Why can’t we be friends)

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Collegian Editor-In-Chief

As Hutchinson Community College is a junior college, the students and instructors have more one-on-one interaction than that of a four-year school, where the professor might not even know the names of his or her students.

That being said, broader communication is often expected of a teacher from the students.

Also, just getting out of high school, where teachers cared whether or not you pass because it is a reflection on them as a teacher, versus coming here to find out that being an adult, the instructors aren’t there to make sure you do everything right and get homework in on time. That is mainly up to the students and their responsibility to balance their lives accordingly to their academics.

Some students believe that instructors communicate a fair amount, while others view the communication is lacking.

HutchCC freshman Autumn Frickey, Lindsborg, gave her views on teacher-student communication.

“Honestly, the instructors I’ve had don’t communicate as I thought they would, and it’s just easier to ask friends or people in class for help,” Frickey said.

Frickey makes the argument that instructors should check their email more often and that checking emails is the overall issue for articulation with instructors.

When asked what her preferred method of communication, Frickey said, “I would talk to my teachers face-to-face, but normally they have to rush to their next class to get ready, so email is better.”

Since communication is generally a two-way deal, and not all of the responsibility is on the instructor, Frickey said, “Some students should ask questions earlier, but I feel as if it is both the student and the teacher’s fault. However, the school isn’t that big and I feel like they should be more one-on-one with the students.”

Sociology instructor Kim Newberry, who has worked at the college for more than a decade, shared her thoughts on communication between her students, and agrees that it is lacking not only between students, but everywhere.

“I have students that will email a question when they are sitting in my class and could ask right then,” Newberry said.

Sometimes classes can fluctuate when it comes to being social and in Newberry’s case, she recognizes that one class of hers is very quiet where no one hardly talks while other classes seem to carry conversations just fine.

Newberry said the reason for the inadequacy which she believes is that students would rather be on their phones or listening to music.

The most appropriate form of communication to Newberry would be to speak to one another in person. “Email is great for quick communication, but face-to-face is always bet for anything serious,” Newberry said.

When asked how this issue could be resolved, Newberry said, “If a student has an issue, he or she needs to learn how to communicate, most of us only want our students to succeed, and we cannot help if we do not know that there is a problem.”

Also when it comes to discussion between students and instructors, Newberry said that seeing each other in person should be the norm for all relationships.

“So many nuances of communication can be lost in an email or a text,” Newberry said.

Amber Brawner, coordinator/instructor of the visual media design program who has been at HutchCC for about 12 and a half years, shared her expectations of communication from her students lately.

“Communication is definitely a two-way street,” Brawner said. “It’s frustrating when students just walk out of the class without saying a word because oftentimes they miss material that is on a test or instructions for an assignment, and then wonder why they get the grade that they got.”

She also said that it is irritating when that same student doesn’t talk to her about their grade and how to get extra credit.

Are 8 a.m. classes too early?

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

Justin Harris tries to stay in a group discussion during his 8 a.m. class, but he’s not a fan of the early start time.

By Brenna Eller
Editor-In-Chief

Early classes aren’t uncommon at Hutchinson Community College. Many students have had, or will possibly attend, an 8 a.m. class at some point if they haven’t already. Some may be dreading it, while others are used to waking up early.

Some colleges have already made it so that classes start later in the morning because the instructors worry about their students not making it to their class and were concerned with the lack of sleep they were getting.

Colleges that disagree with that idea believe early classes help students with time management and prepare them for future careers where they will have to get up early in the morning.

Simon Gadberry, a HutchCC freshman from Little River, described how he felt towards 8 a.m. classes.

“I like the class,” Gadberry said. “It’s a little early, but if you take something easy, that class gets you ready to take on the day.”

It is sometimes assumed that students who would rather have a later class instead of an 8 a.m. tend to slack off a bit more at their first class of the day and pay less attention.

Gadberry agrees to this statement saying, “Yeah they do, you can tell there is always that one person that walks in late and doesn’t put any effort into their work.”

However, there are also students who believe 8 a.m. classes are too early and shouldn’t be allowed due to being involved in sports and other activities on campus.

HutchCC student/athlete, Justin Harris, a sophomore from Louisiana, plays football for the Blue Dragons and admits that it is challenging waking up for his 8 a.m. class.

Harris said that this is his first 8 a.m. in college after transferring from Baylor, so he said  that he has a tough time staying awake in the class, even if he enjoys the material being taught.

When describing his feelings toward 8 a.m. classes, Harris said, “Words can’t even explain, they just suck.”

Consequently, Harris doesn’t think he performs as well as he would’ve if the class was later in the day.

“If I had to choose a good time to start class, my ideal time would be 10 a.m.,” Harris said.