Archive for the ‘Top Story’ Category

Roebuck’s Reward

Friday, November 30th, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College women’s basketball team is off to a strong start this season, going 7-0 for the first part of the season. The Blue Dragons are off to a hot start, but this would not be possible without the help of standout sophomore Dejanae Roebuck.

Roebuck, a sophomore forward from Olathe, has been the player to watch for the Blue Dragons this season. While Roebuck is having a successful season so far, the story has not always been the same for her.

Coming in as a freshman, Roebuck didn’t know what to expect. She was not the dominant player fans have seen on the court this season, but more fearful and shy as a freshman.

“As a freshman I was a little more timid,” Roebuck said. “I didn’t really know how to take charge. I think now that I know what to expect, I’m definitely more of a leader on the team.”

Roebuck improving is something the coaches have noticed. Roebuck has improved on her skill in all positions and is someone who the coaches want out on the floor.

“She has definitely come out of her shell. She was timid at times and played on her heels a lot. She was non-aggressive and has gotten stronger and has more confidence,” Blue Dragons coach John Ontjes said. “She has expanded her game to where she can play on the perimeter. She has become a very versatile player for us.”

Roebuck is one of the leaders on the team, but the position wasn’t handed to her overnight. A lot of work and dedication was put into becoming the player she is today. Roebuck worked hard during the off season, practicing and getting extra shots up when she could.

The hard work is showing up, especially in games, as Roebuck is making 55.4 percent of her shots and shooting 43.8 percent from the 3-point line.  Out of the seven games played, Roebuck has started in all of them and is averaging 17.4 points per game.

Along with putting in the extra work outside of practice, Roebuck is someone who her younger teammates look up too. Conference play is starting to gear up for the Blue Dragons and the returning players know what to expect. The freshmen look up to and follow the sophomore’s examples on and off the court.

“I think that as sophomores we know what to expect and we have to help them get a feel for how the game is played and the pace we play at,” Roebuck said. “I think they are definitely coming along pretty well.”

Come for a grand Ye Olde time

Friday, November 30th, 2018

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

The Hutchinson Community College Fine Arts Department is collaborating its Theatre and Concert Chorale to present the Ye Olde Madrigal Feaste. It started Thursday, and goes through Saturday.

Everything begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Waldo Auditorium of Lockman Hall.

Deidre Ensz-Mattox, Theatre/Speech Instructor and Director of Theatre at HutchCC, shares some insight as to what the evening would have in store for those who go.

“Ye Olde Madrigal Feaste isn’t really about anything,” Ensz-Mattox said. “It’s not a plot-based play. It’s an experience. The performance is set in old England in a grand hall complete with king and queen, court jesters, lord and ladies. Audience members will be encouraged to engage with performers and participate in a medieval style Christmas celebration.”

The choir, with direction of Neal Allsup, Director of Choral Activities, will be performing ceremonial music, Christmas carols and madrigals.

The theatre members will be doing a comedic play as well as improvisational theatrics. The cast consists of fanfare trumpeters, the court jester, butler and wenches. All costumes are to be authentic reproductions of period apparel.

General admission seating, with dinner, is $20. Employee and students tickets are $10.

The meal is a four-course meal complete with wassail, salad, main course (chicken), and traditional bread pudding.

A side note for those who might not know what wassail is; a beverage of hot mulled cider, drank traditionally as an integral part of wassailing, a Medieval Christmastide English drinking ritual intended to ensure a good cider apple harvest the following year.

The event should last about 90 minutes.

 

If you go

What: Ye Olde Madrigal Feaste

Where: Waldo Auditorium, Lockman Hall

When: 7:30 p.m. today and Saturday

Tickets: $20 general admission, $20 for HutchCC employees and students. Includes a four-course dinner.

Ghosting will haunt you

Friday, November 30th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Campus Editor

For anyone who is unfamiliar with the term “ghosting”, it is when one person blocks another on social media, and completely shuts them out of their life without giving a reason why, or what they did wrong to deserve to get blocked in the first place.

Family and friends who end up getting blocked by someone they see as a loved one will most likely never speak to that person again, because they were perceived as toxic and unkind. Or, it could be that they are scared of dealing with the fact that the person doing the ghosting has to tell the truth and wants to protect the other person’s feelings.

Two Hutchinson Community College students, a professor, and a counselor gave some thought on why they think ghosting occurs.

Mariah Buck, a sophomore at HutchCC, said why the ghoster might act the way he or she does.

“Because they don’t want to talk to the other person, and is done with them. they got what they wanted out of them,” Buck said.

Freshman student Paje Roberts has a similar opinion on why people get ghosted.

“I think the main reason people tend to ghost others is because face-to-face communication has become a tedious and menial task to many” she said. “At some point, the entire idea of any communication whatsoever becomes too tedious. Due to their own laziness, people neglect to be considerate enough to take the time to be emotionally and personally responsible”.

HutchCC psychology instructor Brian Nuest, who holds a doctorate degree, said a person’s personality can cause them to ghost.

“However, I can imagine that one reason people ghost could be because they are passive rather than assertive,” Nuest said. “They simply want to avoid confrontation. Also, perhaps the would-be ghost feels that telling the other party the truth might actually be more hurtful to them than fading away.”

Christopher Lau, Coordinator of Advising, Career Development and Counseling at HutchCC, gives his explanation on why students tend to ghost others.
“I have very limited experience with students and/or professionals ‘ghosting’ each other in relationships,” Lau said in an email. “However, I can make assumptions about why this is done and the potential impact it might have on the person who is ghosted. First, I would assume the person ghosting is doing so because it is easier to do this than face the awkwardness that is sometimes present in difficult conversations (such as) breaking up with someone.”

Lau said the emotional damage that comes with ignoring or ghosting someone can last.

“This behavior seems to me, to be incredibly rude, disrespectful, and inappropriate. In some ways, it may be easier for a person to deal with the death of a partner than to be ghosted by one. Death is a natural end to life whereas with ghosting there is an abrupt, unnatural, unexplained end to a relationship,” Lau said.

Coca-Cola vs. Pepsi: Battle of the brands

Friday, November 30th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor-In-Chief

For over a century, two sodas, Coca-Cola and Pepsi, have been rivals in the soft drink industry. Each brand owns several other companies and has held competitions against the other.

For instance, in 1975, there was a Pepsi Challenge which led to the New Coke, a drink that failed so bad that people weren’t buying any and the company had to return to its old recipe.

After that, commercials were made against each other, and both brands adopted new slogans every now, and then to persuade people to buy their products. A couple of taglines that have resonated with audiences were, “Have a Coke and a smile” and “Pepsi, the choice of a new generation”.

People tend to drink whatever is in their household, so growing up drinking a certain type of pop might have influence on what someone prefers to drink, or whether they like a certain brand over another.

Ask anyone if they prefer Coke or Pepsi, and they will most likely answer right away, because it is that provoking of a topic. Coke and Pepsi are soda companies that have distributed to countries world wide, so they are always in competition against one another.

Hutchinson Community College has a contract with Pepsi that gives Pepsi exclusive rights to sell its products on campus.

Those who are more inclined to drink Coke aren’t agreeable about this decision. Some may not mind either way or choose to drink water.

Luke Nachtigal, a HutchCC student, prefers Coke.

“Coke is better in my own opinion, especially as they sell the California Raspberry flavor in glass bottles at our local Dillon’s Marketplace,” Nachtigal said.

Even though he favors Coke, Nachtigal’s grandfather would strongly disagree.

“He likes to reminisce about when Pepsi only cost a nickel in the 50s,” Nachtigal said, “I have an empty glass Pepsi bottle from that era sitting as a decoration on my shelf, and I must say, it serves as cool vintage decor.”

When referring to the contract, Nachtigal had some thoughts as to why Pepsi could be beneficial for the college.

“Pepsi seems to be more popular among especially those who don’t care enough to only want the best pop from out of glass bottles,” Nachtigal said, “I have heard many people say that they think Pepsi is better than Coke as well.”

Another HutchCC student who chooses Coke over Pepsi is Danielle Nading.

“I enjoy Coke products more, I think they are higher quality and have a better taste than Pepsi,” Nading said.

When asked if she was aware of the school being Pepsi-based, Nading said, “I was not aware that it was a Pepsi school, because I just assumed that most people drank Coke nowadays.”

Nading also mentioned that she thought Pepsi to be “an older product that is outdated”.

HutchCC student Laynee Barlow, prefers Pepsi to Coke.

“I’m not a huge pop drinker and Pepsi doesn’t have much carbonation, and is sweeter tasting than other pops,” Barlow said, “I don’t like the carbonation in pop, so that’s why I prefer Pepsi.”

Cheating on the minds of students as finals near

Friday, November 30th, 2018

By Tabitha Barr
Opinion Page Editor

With final examinations just a couple days away, the clock is ticking for students to crack down on studying while sleep becomes obsolete.

Students are either freaking out and trying to study a semester’s worth in the nights before, or they have given up hope and accepting whatever comes their way. Those who are struggling with course material may be thinking of ways to help them test easier.

Cheating on finals has become a compelling grade booster over the years for students. Students know cheating is wrong and can have extreme consequences, but for some, it’s a pathway out of failing.

According to Hutchinson Community College’s academic honesty policy, if a student is caught cheating, he/she is subject to expulsion from the class or even the institution. Giving in to cheating on a final is risking a lot for a student as in they could get kicked out of the college. Yet, students are still compelled to divulge in this wrongdoing. Why is that?

Students, and college students especially, are subjected to many stressors in day-to-day life. They have school, work, homework, a social life, and they have to account for everything else that the body needs in order to live and thrive. With multiple tests coming their way, all of which determine their final grade, their workloads get a whole lot heavier.

The prospect of cheating is presented to those who are worried that they don’t know the material as well as they should, those who have intense test anxiety, or those who are just too lazy to actually try and study. Cheating becomes the cushion that students think they need in order to achieve a good grade. But it is actually hurting them, rather that helping them.

Kelly Clasen, an English instructor at HutchCC, knows how hard it can be, but wants students to be honest with themselves.

“I do understand that students panic and get overwhelmed, and I sympathize with students who experience test anxiety,” Clasen said. “However, I don’t feel like a potentially higher score on a final exam is ever worth compromising one’s integrity.”

In college, the classes students are taking are those that are important to their future. Cheating in these courses can hurt a student in their future work while also hurting their morals. Once a person cheats, the brain then starts to back up why it was OK to do it, and does the same for future situations?

But for students, the only thing in their minds is how to not fail their class. According to a student of HutchCC who will remain under anonymity, the reason they have cheated on tests in the past is because they need a good grade and it’s actually “an adrenaline rush.” They know that it was wrong, but they needed a good grade to do well in their future endeavors.

Overall, cheating on finals is not worth the physical or mental consequence that can occur. For students struggling with the prospect of cheating, Clasen said to avoid the temptation to cheat during exams, they should be “sitting off by themselves and keeping cellphones out of reach. (She) also recommends that students avoid the need to cheat the old-school way: by studying.”

Cheating is not the way to go. A class grade doesn’t determine an entire future. It just shows people what they can do with how much effort they exert. To all HutchCC students, good luck on your finals and don’t have the temptation to cheat. Just study and do your best, and everything will work itself out.

Guess that’s why they call it the blues: Mid-semester blues, instructor edition

Thursday, November 15th, 2018

Dr. Amanda Smith

Jessica Niblack

By Brenna Eller
Editor In Chief

From planning classes to grading homework and tests multiple times a week, many of the instructors at Hutchinson Community College experience the same mid-semester burnout similar to that of their students.

Teachers are responsible for the education of particular subjects and normally put on a “performance” to help the students learn, and simultaneously make them interested in the subject matter. The job of the student is to sit and comprehend the teachers and if the teacher doesn’t get through to their students, it may affect how the student does in the class. With that stress, it isn’t difficult to imagine instructors going through the mid-semester slump.

Sociology instructor Jessica Niblack gave insight on how she views the mid-semester burnout.

“I feel like the longer we go in a semester without a break, the harder it is to stay focused,” Niblack said, “In the fall semester, we start to burn out right before Fall Break, but many are able to get that second wind that takes them to Thanksgiving break. After that it’s smooth sailing.”

To Niblack, the spring semester is worse in burning out because of the long periods of breaks.

“After Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we don’t get a break until Spring Break, which is almost the end of March,” Niblack said.

When it comes to engaging her students with a positive attitude, Niblack feels that the more interesting topics are later covered in the semester. The start of the semester is geared more towards terminology and research whereas at this time in the semester, students are more interested in the content. “As we move through the semester we touch on culture, race, gender, social class, media, which many students can relate to in some way which in turn makes it more interesting to them,” Niblack said.

When the students are engaging more, Niblack gets excited and the process keeps her positive.

“Also, I can always see the light at the end of the tunnel,” Niblack said.

When it gets to be the end of the semester, Niblack gives her students pep talks of perseverance and reminds them the feeling when semester is over.

For instructors or students experiencing burn out, Niblack would advise them to stay positive no matter what.

“As an instructor, our attitude can be contagious, and if we are whining and complaining, then our students will do the same.”

Regarding burn-outs, Niblack said, “Students need to understand that this is the final step into the adult world. Now is the time for them to learn to adapt and become able to meet the expectations or they will have a harder time finding success. They need to also understand they they will get burnt out at their jobs, they may not like their boss, or the people they work with, but learning to deal with these obstacles are all part of life.”

Another instructor at HutchCC is Amanda Smith, who teaches psychology. When it comes to burning out mid-semester, she said she understands how the students may feel.

“I was a college student for many years, and I can empathize with this feeling,” Smith said, “Coursework is demanding, but students also manage other stressors throughout the semester – jobs, sports and other campus activities, relationships, paying bills, health, family, etc.”

Smith also recognizes the stress for students that come with finals and projects being put off to the last minute.

“Even though students are typically made aware of end-of-semester deadlines at the beginning of the semester, it is easy to ignore them until all are simultaneously looming in the near future (only a few weeks away),” Smith said “Now, more than ever, it is important to be intentional in how you use your time and stress does not come from the events, but from how you perceive these events.”

Keeping a positive mindset is how Smith believes students should perceive the mid-semester stress.

“If you perceive the events as temporary, and that you will soon be done, this can help you feel more optimistic,” Smith said.

Smith also likes to remind students that a break is right around the corner. When asked if she experiences the mid-semester burnout, Smith said, “Oh, my yes. For every hour I spend in front of the class, I need roughly 3-4 hours in preparation.”

Dr. Smith also spends 6-8 hours a week grading homework or tests.

Even though she gets stressed at this time of the semester, Dr. Smith is still positive.

“I love what I do and I love my students, so even when I’m exhausted, it never feels burdensome,” Smith said.

In order to fight off stress or exhaustion, Dr. Smith makes sure she is in good health. Sleeping is a very important aspect for Smith and she believes getting the right amount can help immeasurably. “Even though you do not feel as if you have enough time, make time for sleep, exercise, and short breaks, all of which can help with focusing attention, learning and memory,” Smith said.

Smith also makes sure she has quality family time as well as prioritizes her exercising and work schedule. “There are only 24 hours in a day, which unfortunately is not going to change. Mindfully managing that time, working smarter and more efficiently, is vital to decreasing stress,” Smith said.

When it comes to keeping positivity Smith and her coworkers try to help each other out as much as possible. “I often talk with other instructors; we have a wonderful camaraderie and encourage one another. And if all else fails, I keep a stash of chocolate in my desk drawer!,” Smith said.

For students managing time and stress, Dr. Smith advises a decreased amount of time on cell phones.

“Put your mobile devices away while you try to study, as these are only going to distract you! Instead stay connected by getting some coffee or lunch with members of your support system (friends, family),” Smith said.

In it to win it: Kibet wins national championship

Thursday, November 15th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Co-Sports Editor

As Andrew Kibet crossed the finish line on Saturday at Garden City’s Buffalo Dunes Golf Course, he made history.

Kibet became the first Hutchinson Community College men’s cross-country runner to become a national champion.

Toward the end of the race, Kibet didn’t even know he was going to hold the title of national champion.

“To be honest, I didn’t know I was going to win that race because I gave it my best,” Kibet said. “Let me go to the finish line, whoever will come pass me it is OK, but I will just try to go ahead of pace.”

Kibet came from Kenya, originally playing volleyball and running middle-distance races, to becoming a cross country national champion.

“I couldn’t believe it,” Kibet said. “From being a 1500-meter runner to a cross country champion that was a big achievement.”

Throughout the entire hilly course, Kibet managed to have the right mindset, despite his one loss being a hilly course.

“In cross country it’s about mentality,” Kibet said “So, you need to plan before you cross the finish line. Some people have a finishing kick. In order to avoid that you need to set a pace, so they won’t have the energy at the end of the race.”

The Garden City course was like no other course the Blue Dragon men and women’s cross-country teams had seen before.

“There’s this giant hill that’s almost torture to make them run up,” Hutchinson coach Justin Riggs said.

“It’s like climbing Everest, and the guys had to do this twice.”

Kibet was challenged throughout the race by Cloud County’s Dennis Kiptoo and Colby’s Nehemiah.

He was also challenged by Iowa Central runner Ezekiel Kipchirchir. By mile four, ir was Kiptoo and Kibet.

Kibet then pulled away for the win with a time of 25 minutes, 25.3 seconds. Riggs had only good things to say about the last meet for the season.

“For him to come out on top in that field and those conditions says a lot about him and strength as a runner,” Riggs said.

This is only the start for Kibet. Not only is he a freshman, but he still has track season to come.

The women’s cross-country team also had a memorable season, finishing 12th on Saturday 2018 NJCAA Division I National Cross Country Championships at Buffalo Dunes Gold Club in Garden City.

This is the Blue Dragons best finish since 2004, when they placed ninth. Now it is official time to switch gears and get ready for indoor track season.

“I’m just really proud of (Kibet) and all of our guys,” Riggs said.

“Now it’s time to switch over and start working on track things, which pretty much means focusing more on speed.”

Doreen Welsh, ‘Miracle on the Hudson’ flight attendant, speaks at Dillon Lecture Series

Friday, November 9th, 2018

By Tabitha Barr
Opinion Page Editor

Flying is a common source of transportation for people all around the world. Some people love it, others fear it, but it’s a necessity nonetheless.

For Doreen Welsh, flying was normalcy because it was her job for 38 years. She spoke Tuesday at the Sports Arena during the Dillon Lecture Series. But on Jan. 15, 2009, her life changed in 90 seconds. She was on the crash of flight 1549 but it was later renamed the Miracle of the Hudson. According to Cliff Moore, they were “hailed as heroes,” and will forever be known as that.

Welsh was on her final day of a four-day flight journey and was ready to go home to her son. The flight was taking off from New York’s LaGuardia Airport to Charlotte, North Carolina.
She did her normal routine with the other stewardesses and flight attendants, and she headed to her set position in the back of the plane and buckled up.
Minutes after takeoff, the plane made a jerking motion and Welsh caught a whiff of a “burning smell” that was not normal. She, at first, thought it was something technical and thought that they would just go back to the airport to fix it.
After checking around for signs of danger, she noticed that it was eerily quiet.
“It was total silence,” she said.
Welsh realized the engines weren’t running.
After gesturing to the flight attendants up front, she decided that the pilots didn’t have time to announce what was happening. So she sat back down and buckled up. Seconds after, she heard three words that came from the cockpit that she had been training for in her 38 years. She never thought she would actually here it.
“Brace for impact.”
After a pause of silence, she said, “I remember the terror rippling through my body.”
In the seconds that she had to process it, her thoughts exploded.
“I was in denial,” Welsh said. “This happens to other people, this does not happen to me.”
She then thought through her whole life of the good times. She saw her family, her son, and everything that made her life good.
In those moments, adrenaline kicks in and the brain is put on survival mode. Welsh’s went from zero to 100 in a split second. Truly, that is what kept her going through the whole crash.
She looked in front of her at the passengers and they were praying, phoning loved ones, and holding hands with the people around them, whether they knew their neighbor or not. She remembers thinking, “Everyone had a set of eyes to look to, but I was back there alone.”
Ninety seconds of bracing, and then impact happened. The back of the plane was the first to crash, which is where Welsh was stationed. Because her adrenaline was so high, Welsh didn’t realize that a piece of metal actually came through the bottom of the plane and sliced into her leg on impact.
At this point, water was seeping into the aircraft and was accumulating fast. She kept trying to close the seal of the door, but she didn’t realize that a huge hole behind her station had been torn open. Knowing that no one could evacuate through that door because of the water, she yells for passengers to go forwards because backwards is a complete no-go.
By this time, the water has increased up to her chest and three passengers were frozen with fear and aren’t responding to her commands to move. She could have easily put her life first and gone past them for her own safety, but she couldn’t do that. At that point, she stood at a certain point and accepted that that was where she was going to die. But she had this voice in her head that said, “One more time, go for it.”
So the next thing she knew, she was closer to the exit and the passengers. Welsh managed to make sure that everyone in her group was out of the plane before she left and went to one of the rafts.
When she went to grab her life vest, this is when she saw her torn up leg for the first time. It was a shock. Especially when she was the person with the worst injuries. She was the only one from the plane that had to have surgery.
Welsh had two heroes that night, one being a ferry boat passenger that helped her from the raft and keeping her warm and calm. The second was an New York police officer who stayed with her until her son showed up for her.
After two courageous people helped her on her way, Welsh was taken to the hospital for surgery. The first face she saw was her son and he greeted her with an “I love you but you are done flying.”
From this whole experience, Welsh has gained a new perspective on life. She’s made relationships with the people on that plane that would have never been if this didn’t happen.
Yes, this was a very difficult experience to go through, but it taught Welsh a lot about herself and life. There are many things she wants people to take away from her emotional story but there are two that she pointed out. The first is to “tell the people you love that you love them because you just don’t know what’s around the corner.” And the second is life is just about the people you love and making memories that make life better.
The reason this event is so incredible is because there were no fatalities. It could have been known as the crash of Flight 1549 but because the plane staff did their jobs and everyone helped others out, it has gone down in history as the Miracle of the Hudson. Welsh is known to many about her experience, but to those passengers, she is know at savior of that day.

Flying is a common source of transportation for people all around the world. Some people love it, others fear it, but it’s a necessity nonetheless.

For Doreen Welsh, flying was normalcy because it was her job for 38 years. She spoke Tuesday at the Sports Arena during the Dillon Lecture Series. But on Jan. 15, 2009, her life changed in 90 seconds. She was on the crash of flight 1549 but it was later renamed the Miracle of the Hudson. According to Cliff Moore, they were “hailed as heroes,” and will forever be known as that.

Welsh was on her final day of a four-day flight journey and was ready to go home to her son. The flight was taking off from New York’s LaGuardia Airport to Charlotte, North Carolina.
She did her normal routine with the other stewardesses and flight attendants, and she headed to her set position in the back of the plane and buckled up.
Minutes after takeoff, the plane made a jerking motion and Welsh caught a whiff of a “burning smell” that was not normal. She, at first, thought it was something technical and thought that they would just go back to the airport to fix it.
After checking around for signs of danger, she noticed that it was eerily quiet.
“It was total silence,” she said.
Welsh realized the engines weren’t running.
After gesturing to the flight attendants up front, she decided that the pilots didn’t have time to announce what was happening. So she sat back down and buckled up. Seconds after, she heard three words that came from the cockpit that she had been training for in her 38 years. She never thought she would actually here it.
“Brace for impact.”
After a pause of silence, she said, “I remember the terror rippling through my body.”
In the seconds that she had to process it, her thoughts exploded.
“I was in denial,” Welsh said. “This happens to other people, this does not happen to me.”
She then thought through her whole life of the good times. She saw her family, her son, and everything that made her life good.
In those moments, adrenaline kicks in and the brain is put on survival mode. Welsh’s went from zero to 100 in a split second. Truly, that is what kept her going through the whole crash.
She looked in front of her at the passengers and they were praying, phoning loved ones, and holding hands with the people around them, whether they knew their neighbor or not. She remembers thinking, “Everyone had a set of eyes to look to, but I was back there alone.”
Ninety seconds of bracing, and then impact happened. The back of the plane was the first to crash, which is where Welsh was stationed. Because her adrenaline was so high, Welsh didn’t realize that a piece of metal actually came through the bottom of the plane and sliced into her leg on impact.
At this point, water was seeping into the aircraft and was accumulating fast. She kept trying to close the seal of the door, but she didn’t realize that a huge hole behind her station had been torn open. Knowing that no one could evacuate through that door because of the water, she yells for passengers to go forwards because backwards is a complete no-go.
By this time, the water has increased up to her chest and three passengers were frozen with fear and aren’t responding to her commands to move. She could have easily put her life first and gone past them for her own safety, but she couldn’t do that. At that point, she stood at a certain point and accepted that that was where she was going to die. But she had this voice in her head that said, “One more time, go for it.”
So the next thing she knew, she was closer to the exit and the passengers. Welsh managed to make sure that everyone in her group was out of the plane before she left and went to one of the rafts.
When she went to grab her life vest, this is when she saw her torn up leg for the first time. It was a shock. Especially when she was the person with the worst injuries. She was the only one from the plane that had to have surgery.
Welsh had two heroes that night, one being a ferry boat passenger that helped her from the raft and keeping her warm and calm. The second was an New York police officer who stayed with her until her son showed up for her.
After two courageous people helped her on her way, Welsh was taken to the hospital for surgery. The first face she saw was her son and he greeted her with an “I love you but you are done flying.”
From this whole experience, Welsh has gained a new perspective on life. She’s made relationships with the people on that plane that would have never been if this didn’t happen.
Yes, this was a very difficult experience to go through, but it taught Welsh a lot about herself and life. There are many things she wants people to take away from her emotional story but there are two that she pointed out. The first is to “tell the people you love that you love them because you just don’t know what’s around the corner.” And the second is life is just about the people you love and making memories that make life better.
The reason this event is so incredible is because there were no fatalities. It could have been known as the crash of Flight 1549 but because the plane staff did their jobs and everyone helped others out, it has gone down in history as the Miracle of the Hudson. Welsh is known to many about her experience, but to those passengers, she is know at savior of that day.

Hey Blue Dragon fans and Hutchinson residents – get your ass to Gowans Stadium on Saturday

Friday, November 2nd, 2018

Hey Hutchinson residents and Blue Dragon fans – the game against Hutchinson Community College’s rival Garden City Community College will be on Saturday at noon, so be there or be square.

HutchCC is ranked No.4, and our team is full of amazing talent that barely gets seen. It’s just so sad to think that these guys work so hard to get to where they are and people don’t show up to watch them. If you played sports in high school or are currently playing a different sport, wouldn’t you want people cheering on your team and yelling words of encouragement? Looking into such a small crowd is discouraging for the team, and it probably makes them feel underappreciated.

School spirit has really diminished over the years. Is it due to not having loyalty to your school or because you still only root for your hometown high school team? I can assure you that you don’t have to only cheer for one team. Everyone has their favorite professional or NFL team they like, so why can’t you have a favorite junior college team?

Even if it’s cold out, that shouldn’t necessarily keep anyone from attending a game. You can bundle up, bring hot chocolate or coffee, and dress for the weather. Most football games tend to be chilly. That’s just how it is in the fall.

I know there are some valid reasons for not attending the game, if you work or have a family event/emergency, but if you are doing absolutely nothing on a Saturday and especially are in Hutchinson, you may as well make an experience out of the day and go to the game.

Not only does watching the game at Gowans Stadium give you a chance to socialize with family or friends, but also gives you a chance to get into the HutchCC and local spirit, and show some pride in the school. No one wants to go to a college football game that isn’t hyped up. Having a fun audience makes the whole game exciting.

What happened to student sections? What is a football game, or any game, for that matter without the heckling of the other team? It just isn’t fun at all. The best games are ones that crowds interact in the most.

Another fantastic reason to come to the game on Saturday is because any student or instructor at the college gets in free with their I.D. That should make everyone want to go. That way, you have some money for stadium food or a hot drink.

A big crowd makes coaches and players happy and fired up, so help them out and cheer them on. There should never be home games with a half-empty stadium. so fill in those seats, deck yourself out in blue and red, and show support for your school and the Blue Dragons.

Brenna Eller is a Little River sophomore studying journalism. She is the Collegian Editor in Chief.

Rested Blue Dragons ready for Broncbusters

Friday, November 2nd, 2018

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

The Hutchinson Community College football team has a pretty big weekend ahead.

The 8-1 Blue Dragons are nationally ranked at No. 4 and are scheduled to take on the 8-0, No. 2 ranked Garden City Broncbusters at noon on Saturday at Gowans Stadium. The winner of this game could potentially have a spot in the NJCAA national championship game next month in Pittsburg.

Two weeks ago, the Blue Dragons had big win over Dodge City, and it did not go unnoticed by coach Rion Rhoades.

“It was really good outing for us,” Rhoades said. “I thought our team did a really good job of handling going to Dodge City and doing the things they need to do to get a big win.”

Coming off the win at Dodge, the football team headed into a much-needed bye week.

The Blue Dragons took full advantage of their week off. The team needed an opportunity to get rested, and with any luck, get some much-needed players back on the field. A light week of workouts for the team will hopefully help the team to be physically ready on Saturday.

Standout players Monty Montgomery and Dezmon Jackson both agree that last week was the perfect week for a bye week.

“We’ve had some rough games, the last two games,” Jackson said, “They’ve been very physical and they play very hard. I think this (bye) week will help us get ready for the Garden game.”

The next step is to take down Garden City and keep things under control and where they need to be.

“It can be real easy to get too amped up for a game like this, and I think that could be detrimental. There’s a real happy-medium we have to get to,” Rhoades said. “We’re in it emotionally and we’re invested. We’re excited to play and have energy and enthusiasm, but we have to make sure it doesn’t become a detriment to us. That is something we have to be aware of.”

The winner will also be crowned the Jayhawk Conference champion, as this will be Hutchinson’s final conference game. Garden City still has to play Butler.