Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Baseball team ready for some ‘clubhouse jacks’

Monday, May 7th, 2018

A look inside the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A broken window and peeling paint are prominent at the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A wind gust blew off a set of lights near right field at Hobart-Detter Field, damaging a bathroom.

The light pole that lost the lights during a wind storm.

A look at the current clubhouse being built beyond the left-field wall.

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

The Hutchinson Community College baseball team is expecting a new clubhouse soon. It has been long overdue for this installment at Hobart-Detter Field.

The new amenities featured in the clubhouse, which will be located about 50 feet behind the left-field fence, include – a new maintenance facility for half of the building, and the other half will be used as a locker room, laundry area, bathroom, coaches’ office and umpire locker room.

The clubhouse will also be used by the Hutchinson Monarchs, a summer collegiate wood-bat baseball team.

“The city is funding the building,” said HutchCC baseball coach Ryan Schmidt. “We are extremely excited about the building.”

Schmidt also said that the new building will help compete against others in the Blue Dragons’ conference – the Jayhawk West – that have modern clubhouses and enhance help in recruiting.

“We can’t thank the City of Hutchinson enough for seeing this project through and giving our players a great space to call home,” Schmidt said.

The old clubhouse with its busted windows and chipped paint looks just as bad on the inside as it does on the outside. In addition to chipped paint and broken windows is a foul odor wafting inside the clubhouse.

The team is looking forward to having a location for private meetings and more room for equipment.

HutchCC freshman, Dylan Nedved said, “I’m so excited for it, we’re going to hit a lot of clubhouse jacks. We’re going to put some holes in that roof.”

Nedved said the phrase, “clubhouse jacks” is an inside joke and another way of saying hitting home runs that hit the roof of the clubhouse.

Another freshman, Cameron Crandall, shared his excitement for the new clubhouse.

“I think everyone will realize how much space we have now instead of being crowded in our old one,” Crandall said.

Along with the new clubhouse being built, new light fixtures are expected to be put on the field within a year. Damage from the wind April 18 caused one set of lights to fall on the first-base-side restroom building at the baseball field. Only about one-third of the roof was damaged.

 

 

Student provides insight on North Korean peace

Monday, May 7th, 2018

History has been shifting the last few weeks with the news that North Korea has finally agreed to offer peace to South Korea and the United States.

In general, western news outlets have praised North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for this action, and many comments on articles are in support of the historic decision.

A Hutchinson Community College student with strong interest in international affairs has been approached by peers for comment on the peace offering and, although he said he is required to remain anonymous, has agreed to an interview with The Hutchinson Collegian.

The Western Media

Perhaps his biggest concern is the glorification of the deal by Western media.

“What I’m seeing right now is a gross manifestation of the South Korean liberal government apologetic movement that embraces North Korea very blindly,” he said. “When I see news comments that people leave on Facebook, they’re all for it and they don’t seem to cast a shadow of doubt in this current state of affairs where (the South Korean and American) government seems to make a peace accord with North Korea without any predisposition whatsoever against North Korea.

“American news outlets are handling the situation absolutely horribly. The thing about the U.S and South Korean media is that they beautify and they benevolize the North Korean authorities in the grossest manner. For example, in the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, the North Korean invoice visited South Korea, and I came across a few CNN articles, and I was absolutely aghast because the headlines were ‘Look at how Kim Jong-un’s sister handles herself in such a graceful manner.’ ‘Look at her fashion.’ ‘Look at how she gracefully does whatever.’ Do they have any idea what is going on in North Korea?”

The largest player in creating a false narrative of true peace, according to the student, is the news that is wrapped up in embracing, without doubt, the peace deal.

“The thing about the media today is they’re incredibly selective, and you should be equally selective to counter that effect,” he said. “You should be very critical to begin with, and especially if they start reporting their own opinions mixed in with the agendas that they are trying to push. People have been flooded with the one-sided information of North Korea, and you should start being skeptical and looking at the facts.”

The Hidden Horrors

The peace agreement, though not malicious on the surface, has been a cause of concern for many who know what happens behind North Korea’s borders.

“Everyone thinks of North Korea as some sort of joke but it is a very, very dangerous atmosphere there,” he said.

Although the historic event is newsworthy, there is yet to be proof that North Korea is willing to change.

“As far as I’m concerned, they have not displayed a single shred of evidence of commitment towards peace or the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” he said. “North Korea is the most violent, most radical state actor that practices Marxist-Leninism in the most pathological fashion.”

After recent events, the source had been approached by several curious peers seeking insight from their politically-inclined friend.

“When people ask me how I would describe North Korea in a very simple fashion, I tell them that North Korea is like a pressure cooker ready to blow,” he said. “The level of deceit among the commoners in North Korea is beyond your imagination. People are dying of starvation every day and people try to defect from North Korea, even though it means certain death for them and their family, if they get caught. They’re defecting at a rate that has been unprecedented before, so that should speak some volumes about what the state of of North Korea is like.”

The student doubts North Korea’s willingness to denuclearize due to their dependence on the alternative weapons.

“What North Korea has done is a very dangerous move,” he said. “Both nations supposedly agreed to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, which made me giggle quite hard because North Korea has not shown a shred of evidence towards denuclearization. They changed their entire rhetoric three months ago when before that they had constantly said, consistently, that they were going to pursue the nuclear weapons program.”

Without their nuclear weapons, he said he believes North Korea would fall to South Korea.

“North Korea’s entire regime hinges upon the asymmetrical and unconventional warfare capabilities that are in the form of nuclear weapons,” he said. “It transcends any other countries dependence on such program because North Korea has the largest military, in terms of sheer number. Every citizen is mandated to serve for at least a decade. But without nuclear weapons or CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense) capabilities, South Korea alone, without even U.S support, could crush North Korea.”

Assuming that South Korea, the United States and North Korea can come to a mutual agreement, the student believes there should be strict stipulations.

America’s Involvement

“The U.S will undoubtedly play a major role in this situation, because the U.S is South Korea’s closest ally,” He said. “I have no doubt that President Trump will pursue a goal that will be in America’s best interests, but a real danger that I see is a parallel to Obama’s Iran Nuclear Deal. The false narrative Obama propagated throughout the media was that it was a win, when it was clearly not. It’s still being bashed from the whole political spectrum, because it granted Iran the right to pursue their own nuclear interest. The false narrative in which leaders create to show themselves as a winner is the same risk that I see Trump repeating for himself.”

Perhaps more worrying for the student is the number of American protesters supporting the same ideology that dictates North Korea.

“The fundamental tenets of the political left and communism are very similar in nature,” He said. “They call out for equality of outcome and they importance of group identity trumping individual characteristics and violence if they don’t agree with you. The reason I say communism is a murderous ideology, and I say that for a very good reason, is that just take a look at history. People have forgotten the simple truth of life that grass is green, the sky is blue, and communists cannot be trusted.”

The student said that he believes that many people waving the communist flag, whether they do so ironically or not, are oblivious to the horrors that exist within communist North Korea.

“Imagine someone doing that with a Nazi flag – you have an immediate response to that because Nazis have committed horrible atrocities in the 20th century,” he said. “The communist flag represents the same. They are completely oblivious to the havoc that these communist and Marxist ideologies have wrought upon the world.”

Who’s who recognize hard working students

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

The Who’s Who Among Students national organization is conducting a strategic review, and the organization did not accept nominations this year. This could be a reason why some colleges have stopped supporting this program or have not recognized their students.

However, Hutchinson Community College continues to have this program, led by Academic Affairs and Curriculum/Program Improvement Coordinator Ryan Diehl.

“We wanted to find a way to continue to recognize our students, which led to the decision to create Who’s Who among Students at Hutchinson Community College,” Diehl said.

Wednesday, the Who’s Who among Students at Hutchinson Community College ceremony was at the Stringer Fine Arts Gallery Theatre.

Diehl has been the organizer for Who’s Who among Students at Hutchinson Community College since 2009, with other co-chairs.

Each year, Diehl and other faculty members recognize a variety of students that achieve academic excellence.

According to Diehl, these students need to meet particular criteria to be considered as a candidate.

“My involvement started somewhat by accident,” Diehl said.

Before, the coordinators for the event were Ila Stone and Pat Bryant. When Stone retired in 2008, Bryant was searching for another helper. Diehl happened to be in the office next to Bryant, and the rest fell into place.

Since then, she retired and others have continued to help Diehl keep the tradition going.

“During my undergraduate years, I coordinated the event for several years thanks to an organization on campus in which I was I was involved overseeing it,” Diehl said. “Pat’s invitation to take part was a way to continue that work.”

Diehl also said why he enjoys his involvement with the Who’s Who ceremony.

“It’s a great way to recognize many amazing students who have accomplished great things while here at HutchCC,” Diehl said. “I thoroughly enjoy getting to learn about the students when I am crafting the mini-biographies that are read about each of the recipients, as well as meet them at the event.”

Katie Reisinger, Havensville freshman, was one of 34 honorees for this ceremony.

“When I got the email that I was nominated, I was really surprised, especially when I saw the list of people nominated along with me,” Reisinger said. “I was thinking I must have done something really good to be a part of this.”

At the ceremony, Reisinger said that she heard about other students and their involvement on and off campus. “There was a short biography read for each of the honorees by faculty members,” Reisinger said. “A faculty member nominates a student they see as an academic leader.”

That was how Reisinger found out she was nominated. One of her teachers saw her around the community and knew she had already been on a leadership scholarship. Reisinger also filled up her community service hours before she came to the college and still joined Circle K, the community service club on campus.

According to the faculty member, Reisinger also showed hard workmanship and dedication in her studies, and in Symphonic and Pep Band.

Another student picked for the Who’s Who was Nathan Light, Wichita sophomore.

“The ceremony was very exciting, and I felt very grateful to have the pleasure to attend,” Light said. “I felt very honored once I found out I was nominated, and have always been told that my hard work would pay off eventually.”

Light is a member of the sports video team and the budget coordinator for the A/V Club.

When asked why it is important that the college continues the Who’s Who event, Light said, “To help give exposure and recognize the most hard working people here at HCC.”

To make the event better in the future, Light suggests getting the word out more.

“I think we deserve to have asterisks by our name at graduation or be able to wear something there that recognizes who we are and what the program is,” Light said.

The students can be nominated by either faculty or advisors. Then all nominations were reviewed by the Who’s Who Selection Committee

  1. Student must be full time (carrying 12 credit hours or more) and be of sophomore standing (have accumulated 27 or more credit hours).
  2. Student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
  3. Student must be active in at least one campus or
    community activity.

This Year’s Students Being Honored:

Rachel Adamyk
Ian Allen
Merissa Anderson
Devonte Bandoo
Kayla Barber
McKenzey Bell
Antwan Benjamin
Andrew Bleything
Sophia Bowman
Brianna Bradshaw
Victoria Coopman
Alexis Cruz
Matthew Denholm
Austin Engler
Kayli Esser
Joshua Freeman
Patricia Garcia
Kody Herrman
Isaac Hubbell
Storey Jackson
Abigail Jackson
Tyler Korb
Sarah Lewis
Mckenzie Lewis
Nathan Light
Megan Maness
Jayde Miyamoto
John (Thomas) Nelson
Yadira Nunez
Benjamin Pankratz
Tyler Pauly
Kameron Pope
Katelyn Reisinger
Jeffrey “JJ” Rhymes
Hannah Schriner
Allison Schweizer
Peyton Strobel
Megan Tammen
Trey Teeter
Lane Wiens

 

 

EMS teacher retires and gives insight on his teaching in the field

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

Dan Jones is a Hutchinson Community College Emergency Medical Service advisor and has been helping out

Jones has worked at the college for more than 20 years, teaching even as he continued to work in hospitals and with patients.

“I was ready for a change in that point in my life, and so I become a clinical coordinator, and so I would go around Wichita, Salina and Hutch and take students to their clinical settings in the hospital, because that was my area of expertise,” Jones said. “Then I got interested in the classroom, I got my instructor license, in the state to teach in. I got that in 1986, and so I kind of liked going in the classroom, and that was around 2000.

Jones said he worked in the Emergency Medical Technician field, and EMS was the embodiment of medical.

“Doing it on the wing and a prayer, and you don’t have the doctors and the people in the field to help you, and I thought it was interesting,” Jones said. “EMS is more of a specialty area, a jack-of-all-trades. They were the specialty in the crisis situation, so I was always thought that was interesting within EMS.

Jones said he had a lot of students through the years, and he had to change his approach on how kids learned. He said it was a challenge at times, that’s one reason why he wanted to retire.

“It’s getting harder, all the changes, one thing in especially in EMS and medicine and education is that there’s change, and it’s getting a bit harder on the change. I still go with the flow, but it’s been an interesting 23 years at the college. I’ve had different roles, but my favorite would be the classroom.”

Not to say the classroom was easy, but Jones said it was rewarding.

“I’ve had kids with challenges, and they overcome the challenges to get through, and you knew that they wouldn’t be a paramedic. They knew their spot, and would be a good EMT. With specific ones – there have been too many to pick out – but I had one and you could tell she was smart, and it went in the classroom socially inept, and through the class, she really came a long way, and I’ve helped her along the way with that. She’s a paramedic now, and there was a time where I thought I don’t know if she was going to make it or not. But if it’s something I learned, it’s not to give up too early.”

Honors program students thrive with leadership from Ryan Diehl

Friday, April 20th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Online Editor

The Hutchinson Community College Honor’s Project is still going strong, nearly 25 years after its birth.

Ryan Diehl, HutchCC Curriculum and Program Improvement Coordinator, is the Honor’s Project Coordinator.

“The Honor’s Project dates back to the inception of the honor’s program, back in 1993 and 1994, and some of the students talked about how it’s a requirement of their scholarship,” Diehl said. “It’s tied to the Presidential, Presidential Gold and the Honors Merriment Scholarship.”

Diehl said a lot of the students are in the ED15H honors success seminar, and during the fall semester, students brainstorm different topics, and some students have majors that they want to go into.

Other students explore different fields, and Diehl’s role is to help them find a faculty mentor.

“They get together and start working in the spring, and what happens in the spring time, their very first assignment is to complete a proposal agreement with their faculty mentor,” Diehl said. “Then the honors sub committee reviews all the proposals, and then we offer feedback. We either approve them or approve them with some changes that need to be made, or we say ‘you need to come up with a better topic.’

“A majority of the time, it’s either approved or approved with a few changes. The only ones we rejected are projects they aren’t complicated. We try to look for creativity or some contributions to the field. It’s not something you go about and read a Wikipedia entry.”

Astronaut Capt. Scott Kelly inspires crowd

Friday, April 20th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

On April 17, one of the largest crowds the Dillon Lecture Series has ever seen, more than 4,000 people, gathered to listen to astronaut Capt. Scott Kelly, as he inspired the crowd with his speech and reminded them that “the sky is not the limit”.

From the second Kelly stepped on stage to a standing ovation, he told the story of how he transformed himself from class-skipping college student to a beloved and historic astronaut with nearly six million current twitter followers.

“When I was a kid growing up, I was a really, really bad student,” Kelly said, speaking to the hundreds of elementary to high school students from surrounding school districts. “I wanted to do anything else besides be a student.”

Kelly told of his difficulties with ADD and ADHD throughout his primary schooling before explaining that these issues continued to plague him in his first years of college.

“I was still struggling,” Kelly said. “I couldn’t pay attention. I couldn’t study. Eventually, I’m not even going to class anymore.”

But one book from his campus bookstore transformed his life.

“One day, I’m wandering across campus and happen to go into the bookstore to buy gum or something, and I see this book on the shelf,” Kelly said. “I was interested enough that I took my gum money, purchased the book, went back to my dorm room and laid there for the next three days on my unmade dorm room bed and read the stories.”

The book was “The Right Stuff” by Tom Wolfe which told of how astronauts during earlier space travel reached their success.

“If I could just become a better student, maybe I could one day become an astronaut,” Kelly said.

And he did.

The rest of Kelly’s speech followed his adventures and mishaps that he experienced during his more than 500 days in space, while the crowd, packed shoulder-to-shoulder, listened intently on.

Although a career as an astronaut requires intense focus and drive to study, Kelly certainly kept his humor throughout his travels, and he sprinkled his speech with plenty of jokes to keep the crowd entertained and smiling.

“If we can dream it, we can do it,” Kelly said.

“If we have a plan, if we’re willing to take the the risks and make mistakes, if we focus on the things we can control and ignore what we can’t, if we test the status-quo and if we work as a team, because teamwork makes the dream work, and if we do that, then the sky is definitely not the limit.”

National track meet returning to Hutchinson

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

Hutchinson Community College will be the host school for the 2020 NJCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championship, the NJCAA announced on Tuesday.

Gowans Stadium will be where the events will take place May 14-16 2020, except for the throwing events. The discus and shot put will be on the grass field northeast of Gowans, the javelin at Don Michael Field, and the hammer throw will be Fairgrounds Park.

Hutchinson also was the championship host in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2017.

Hutchinson has become something of a hub for the NJCAA to stage national championships. The men’s basketball championship has been in Hutchinson since 1949. The Division 1 Volleyball Championship was at the Sports Arena last November and will be there the next two Novembers.

The Salt City Bowl football game has been in Hutchinson since 2009

Possibility of Kansas State Fair moving from Hutchinson now seems unlikely

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

Word has been going around about possible removal of The Kansas State Fair from Hutchinson.

This came about after a bill was passed by State Rep. Don Schroeder, R-Hesston, which if it passed, would have allowed the State Fair Board to seek proposals from cities that had an interest in hosting the fair.

However, State Sen. Ed Berger, R-Hutchinson and former Hutchinson Community College president, introduced a bill, allowing state sales tax to be collected by and returned to the fair, but only if the fair stayed in Hutchinson. According to an article from The Hutchinson News, “Funds will end if the State Fair leaves the city limits of Hutchinson.”

Hutchinson Community College Director of Marketing and Public Relations Denny Stoecklein began his 20-year-involvement with the State Fair in 1995. His duties were to find corporate sponsorships, scheduling events happening during the fair, and was held responsible for marketing uses of the fairgrounds off-season as well.

After four years, Stoecklein was promoted to Assistant Manager, and in 2003, was titled General Manager. Stoecklein served that role until July 2015, when he was given the opportunity to be PR and Director of Marketing by HutchCC.

“With a history that dates back 100 years in Hutchinson and Reno County, I think the State Fair is quite secure where it’s at,” Stoecklein said. “Fairs are about tradition, traditions that vary with each person.”

When asked how the city of Hutchinson and the college would be affected if the State Fair was to be moved, Stoecklein said that there would be a huge impact, since the fair generates tens of millions of dollars annually, from the fair and many other events, non-fair related that utilize the buildings throughout the years.

Stoecklein said that HutchCC benefits from the fair through marketing offers to potential students, and provides a connection with current and former students.

“Just last year, hundreds of former students stopped by our booth to sign a historic desk from Lockman Hall (that’s currently in display in the Admissions office in the Student Union),” Stoecklein said.

There are also opportunities for student groups or clubs to raise money. They can earn by helping with parking spaces or working in the food court. Nursing students, are able to gain valuable hands-on experience assisting exhibitors in health-related fields,” Stoecklein said.

Behind the scenes of the Dillon Lecture Series

Friday, April 6th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Staff Writer

Much goes into planning the Dillon Lecture Series, which brings four renowned speakers, to Hutchinson Community College annually.

Robin Woodworth – Administrative Assistant to the President – handles all of HutchCC President Carter File’s appointments. Woodworth is helping out with the Board of Trustees and helps out with the lecture series. She contacts a potential speaker’s agent to see if they are willing to give a lecture.

Woodworth has been with the college for seven years and working in File’s office for two years

“Dillon Lecture Series is an organization that started 36 years ago by two ladies in the community, Jeanette Mull and Barbara Peirce, and they wanted to do something based on K-State that had a lecture series, something they can bring to Hutch,” Woodworth said. “We have four speakers a year that come in, on a variety of topics, and the community gets together.

“There’s different topics. We don’t try to focus on any one thing. It’s just who the community will suggest. The community will ask a name, and we will look into it and see if they would be available, if they’re in budget range and what the community thinks. In the past lecture years, there were five or six speakers but, because of the increase in cost of the speaking fees, it takes a lot to get four.”

As far getting a speaker selected, the event organizers come across someone in the news that sounds interesting, or based on a book they wrote.

“We have several people in Kansas, speakers that we have connection with. Dave Dillon came from the Dillon family and was the CEO of Kroger at the same and he came and spoke,” said Woodworth, adding that other Hutchinson natives like Shawn James have been among the series’ speakers.

The community and Woodworth are in the process of selecting speakers for 2019, and if anyone has someone that they think that would be interesting, she would email it to the community she would like to get some speakers for 2019 because they will start their patron drive in late fall and will want to present to them so they want to be a patron.

Annually the community will spend around $4,000-5,000 on a speaker but, yearly the community will spend $45,000-50,000

Dillon Lecture Series

Tickets: Free for students with ID. General admission tickets are $10

Rest of 2018 lecture schedule: April 17, astronaut Scott Kelly; actor RJ Mitte, who battles cerebral-palsy; flight attendant Doreen Walsh, who was on the US Airways flight that landed on the Hudson River.

Astronaut Capt. Scott Kelly in Hutch on April 17

Friday, April 6th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

Navy Capt. Scott Kelly, an astronaut best known for his year-long voyage on the International Space Station, will be visiting Hutchinson Community College for what should be an awe-inspiring speech April 17 through the Dillon Lecture Series and Cosmosphere.

According to Kelly’s web site, scottkelly.com, he is a former military fighter pilot and test pilot, an engineer, a retired astronaut, and a retired U.S. Navy captain. He is a veteran of four space flights, and Kelly commanded the International Space Station on three expeditions and was a member of the yearlong mission to the ISS. In Oct. 2015, he set the record for the total accumulated number of days spent in space, the single longest space mission by an American astronaut.

Kelly resides in Houston.

Robin Woodworth, HutchCC Administrative Assistant to the President and Dillon Lecture Series Coordinator, said she believes that Kelly’s speech on will be important for the community and campus.

“He encourages people to dream and keep persevering and, as he says, ‘The sky is not the limit’,” Woodworth said. “I hope students will take advantage of this, because it’s an opportunity that a lot of people won’t have. I just hope that they would attend all of the Dillon Lectures, because even though they may not know the person or recognize the name, they certainly have something we feel would be a good message for this.”

Sam Wilson, a HutchCC sophomore and box office associate at the Cosmosphere, said he has been looking forward to Kelly’s lecture for months.

“When I first heard that Scott Kelly was coming to Hutchinson, I was ecstatic,” Wilson said. “Being able to hear first-hand accounts of monumental accomplishments, such as living through a long-duration space flight, is exhilarating. It definitely gives me hope for the future of space flight.”

On average, a Dillon Lecture will draw in a crowd of 1,500 people to 1,800, according to Woodworth. But, because of the attention that Kelly’s inspiring adventure has drawn, upwards of 2,300 people are expected to attend.

“I think this will probably be the largest and most-attended lecture,” Woodworth said. “The Cosmosphere spoke to us when we were selecting speakers for the 2018 lectures and suggested that we partner up with Capt. Scott Kelly. They certainly had followed his year in space and thought that he would be a good speaker. It’s a win-win situation for us.

Admittance into the lecture is free for HutchCC students, faculty and staff with an ID. For anyone else interested in attending Kelly’s lecture, tickets are $10.

“From what I can tell, he’s going to tie in his life experiences and struggles from when he was younger,” Woodworth said. “He’ll also talk about how he has endured obstacles and how he never would have imagined he would make history.”