Archive for the ‘News’ Category

‘Trooper Ben’ comes to HutchCC

Friday, October 19th, 2018

By Kat Collins
Staff writer

The Twitter-famous Trooper Ben came to Hutchinson Community College on Oct. 10 to talk about making a brand for individually, and how to get known on social media.

Some of things that he talked about included that social media is 95 percent fun and five percent business, and don’t use social media as a megaphone – use it as a Walkie-Talkie. In other words, use it for one-on-one interaction.

On twitter, Ben, whose real name is Ben Gardner, can be found @TrooperBenKHP. He has more than 59,000 followers. He is originally from Michigan, and when he joined the military, it brought him to Kansas.

During his time in Fort Riley, he met his wife, who was going to Kansas State University at the time. From the beginning that they were dating, she told him that “I won’t leave Kansas.”

So he left the military to be with his wife.

In 2014, Ben asked two of his fellow troopers, Tod and Gary, to join him on Twitter. At first, they were hesitant, but Ben convinced them. They soon agreed to it, and they soon became known as the “Tweeting Troopers”.

Trooper Ben says, “I use my twitter to humanize myself to others – to show that I am more than the badge I wear.”

Maybe the best thing about following Trooper Ben on Twitter? He follows back.

Spooky Legends: The ghosts of Reno Valley Middle School

Friday, October 19th, 2018

By Tabitha Barr
Opinion Page Editor

Schools seem to haunt everyone.

It’s the place we dread to go, but have to nonetheless. However, there is one school in particular that seems to be haunted, not just by memories of teetering grades and awkward throwbacks, but by spirits from the other side. Reno Valley Middle School is located on the outskirts of Hutchinson and is a part of the USD 309 Nickerson-South Hutchinson district. There are many stories from teachers and staff that are unexplainable and creep in many ways.

Three ghosts experiences have been told, but the main ghost everyone knows is the former custodian. A source who would like to remain anonymous shares that the middle school use to have a therapy dog named Allie and “she would often stop and stare at “somebody” near the rear tech lab door. Evidently, this is where an old custodian would stand when she would watch the kids.”

This spirit is, according to legend, just a caretaker of the school who looks out for the students and staff. There is said to be only one picture known to exist with the custodian, and no physical evidence could be provided.

Two girls once took a selfie in the seventh grade girls restroom that seemed nice and innocent, but they were not expecting it to have three faces staring back. In the picture, there is a weird face that appears between two girls. That girls’ restroom has many ghostly feelings reported and they continue to pour in.

Around 10 years ago, Reno Valley even had a man come in and see if he could connect or see any paranormal activity.

To one person’s account, they “were in the office. (The guy) asked (them) to come towards the counselor office. As (they) started down the hall, the temperature dropped and the hair on (their) neck stood up. The guy said that the spirit was on (them).”

So according to a paranormal psychic, the middle school definitely has some ghostly figures among the halls.

The second ghost only a has a couple of witnesses but their stories commonly send shivers down listeners back. This one is of a little girl who yells and calls out for her mommy.

According to Trissa McCabe, an eighth-grade math teacher, “It was a Sunday afternoon and as I worked in my classroom, I heard a little girl yelling. I thought it was another teacher’s daughter. As I waited for them to pop into my room, they never did. So I went to look out the window expecting to see (a) vehicle but the parking lot was empty.” Another teacher said that they heard “Mommy?” when walking down by the gym doors. No one knows who the kid could be or who he is searching for.

The final ghost is said to be the late Steve Lehmann, who was the activities director. He passed away in 2013 but a year after he passed, most of the keys to the cabinets in the Panther Den disappeared. This was Lehmann’s main area of the school and he was always there with students. The keys were “later discovered in a cabinet the staff had been in several times, sitting in plain sight.”

To the staff, it seemed to be too coincidental and they all believed it was Lehmann showing that he was still apart of the school.

Reno Valley Middle School has many paranormal experiences that have been shared throughout the years. Ghosts are a part of the unknown, and, apparently, this middle school is a common ground for both the living and the departed

Spooky Legends: Local library lore

Friday, October 19th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor In Chief

Those who have been to the Hutchinson Public Library may not know that there is an interesting history right in front of them.

Some have noticed when Google searching, “Most haunted places in Kansas”, that the public library usually appears at the top of the list.

From library employees to patrons, many people have claimed to encounter the ghost of a librarian named Ida Miranda Day-Holzapfel, who was one of the first librarians at the Main Street location and worked all over Kansas in several different libraries. Kate Lewis, who works as Marketing and Communications at the library, researched Ida Day and found a lot of new information that most never knew, and sent it to Reno County Museum.

Lewis said that Ida Day had unfinished business at the library and believes that the high electromagnetic field in the basement explains why she seems to be most active in there.

Lewis said that Ida Day was born in Colony in 1888 and was hired at Hutchinson Public Library, then located at 5th and Main Street – now the Union Labor Temple – in 1916 at the age of 28 after being a teacher in Colony and Iola. She made $75 a month and was given a two-weeks paid vacation.

In 1917, during the library remodeling, “Ida and her assistants cataloged and classified every book, a thing which was never done before,” Lewis said, “One of the best ideas which Miss Day has inaugurated into the system of management is the perfection of the reference arrangements.”

Lewis also said that Ida helped people look up any number of books. Ida also mounted and classified 3,000 pictures during this time.

One of Miss Day’s many achievements was sending books out to soldiers during WWI in 1918.

Ida Day was library director from 1916-1925.

In 1925, Ida took a leave of absence for a year to study at the University of Kansas. In 1926, Ida resigned.

Ida was married at the age of 52 to John Holzapfel, in 1940.

In 1946, Ida returned to the library, and there had been plans for another remodel since the population doubled. They wound up building a new library, which is where it is now. Ida even wrote an article for the Library Journal in 1949, which was titled, “Hutchinson Builds Modern Library”, where she described the modernization that was taking place and even included blueprints for the new library.

Ida yet again served as Library Director of the Hutchinson Public Library from 1946-1954

Her husband died in 1948, the same year her sister, Sarah Elizabeth Mather, died.

On Feb. 1, 1954 Ida resigned from the public library and prepared herself to become head of the catalog department at the Tulare County library system in Visalia, Calif. on March 1.

“A wish to be relieved from the administrative duties prompted the change,” Holzapfel said.

She was going to keep her home in Hutchinson at 430 East 12th, which is one of the student/faculty parking lots of Hutchinson Community College.

Ida Day died from a fatal car accident in California at the age of 65.

Lewis was one who has experienced unexplainable things in the library, one of which was when she first was given a tour of the basement and got chills where she felt the hair on her head stand up.

Another experience was while taking photographs with her 7-year old daughter for a stuffed animal sleepover program.

“She doesn’t know about the library ghost,” Lewis said. “I didn’t want her to be scared of the library.”

They walked to the location where the Children’s Services supplies are, which include puppets and paper-mache sculptures in the oldest area of the building built in 1951.

“I thought my daughter would be fascinated,” Lewis said, “Instead, she instantly said that she didn’t like the room and that it felt scary.”

Lewis also said that her daughter didn’t want her to take pictures of the animals and just wanted them to get out of there.

The Hutchinson Public Library Business Manager, Tina Stropes, had a strange encounter with Ida Day about 15 years ago, in 2003. Stropes was working on payroll, adding up timesheets when her calculator started printing “0.00” repeatedly.

“We decided that it was Ida Day wanting to get paid, but she didn’t work any hours,” Stropes said.

That isn’t all that happened, because the next month of doing payroll, Stropes’ calculator did the same thing and she told Ida that she wasn’t working any hours so she wasn’t getting paid and the calculator stopped.

There were other experiences, such as visitors being poked and no one would be there, and some had feelings of being watched.

Whether a believer of ghosts or not, the Hutchinson Public Library is a historical building with an interesting past and is worth the visit to many.

Overcoming adversity: ‘Breaking Bad’ actor R.J. Mitte speaks about overcoming challenges in his life

Friday, October 5th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Collegian Editor-In-Chief

When a child is asked what they want to be when they grow up, they hardly ever say sitting in an office all day or doing something they aren’t fond of. Instead they say they want to be a doctor, firefighter, singer, or even an actor/actress. The limits have seemed to change for college students who once had those dreams themselves.

Twenty-six-year-old actor, model, and cerebral palsy activist, R.J Mitte who spoke at the Ray and Stella Dillon Lecture Series on Tuesday Oct. 2 at the Sports Arena, explains that no one should limit themselves on what they can or can’t do. Mitte spoke about struggles he has faced with the condition and stressed the thought, “Can’t is a decision, and a mindset.”

Mitte is most known for roles in television shows, the main one being Walter White Jr. on AMC’s hit show “Breaking Bad”, who has cerebral palsy, same as Mitte, except in reality, Mitte’s condition is milder, so he had to slow his speech and learn to walk with crutches for the show.

Mitte, like others with CP, was born with the disorder where the brain lacks the appropriate amount of oxygen.  Mitte is also known for characters he played in “Switched at Birth”, “Weeds”, “Vegas”, and even acted in “Hannah Montana” and “Everybody Hates Chris”.

Still acting, Mitte helps with several charities on the side, such as Shriners Hospitals for Children, Special Olympics, ALS Associations, and many more organizations dedicated to helping others.

Mitte was born and raised in Lafayette, Louisiana. From age 3-13, his mother took him to Shriners Hospital for many types of therapy and braces. Mitte was a “severe toe walker and his feet bent downwards, so he walked on the tips of his toes, so he had to go through a lot of physical therapy. During his lecture, Mitte described the casts he had to wear and shared about sticking frozen coins in them during the hot summer to cool his legs.

Despite his optimism, growing up with the disorder had its challenges. Even though Mitte participated in normal childhood activities like soccer and riding dirt bikes, he explained what it was like with bullies.

“People with disabilities don’t want to be labeled as disabled,” Mitte said.

He also explained how a lot of people stand by while bullying takes place.

“If you see something, say something,” Mitte said. “Everyone has the ‘someone else will take care of it’ mentality and we need to break it.”

Mitte followed that thought with a story involving a blind man on the same plane as him recently. The man was in need of assistance, according to Mitte, and got lost trying to figure out where he was going. Mitte decided to step up and guide the man, even though he was a stranger and several people were watching the blind man struggle, yet Mitte was the only one that took initiative.

From a young age, Mitte learned the importance of self-worth. His grandfather pushed the philosophy of “Can’t say can’t” and the idea stuck with him. When answering his grandpa, Mitte had two options, “Yes”, or “I wasn’t in the room, or didn’t hear you.”

His grandfather showed him that even though people told Mitte he couldn’t do specific things, that it was their decision, not his and wanted him to be the best he could be.

Mitte not only faced his own obstacles, but his family’s as well. When he was 12-and-a-half years old, Mitte’s mother was in a car accident that partially paralyzed her for seven years. His grandfather also suffered a stroke that left him fully paralyzed on the left side.

“Without challenges, where would we be in our lives?” Mitte said. “It’s those challenges that shape us.”

In 2006 Mitte’s family moved to California to support his sister, Lacianne, while she was trying out for an acting opportunity. That was also the time, Mitte was recognized and started going to acting classes just for fun and to meet kids his own age. Before he knew it, Mitte was pushed into the entertainment industry, or as he called it, “The Mob”.

The main focus of Mitte’s speech was to not limit yourself to the small things, but instead reach as far as you can, and then even further.

“It’s up to you how far you want to reach,” Mitte said. “Step out of your realm of comfort.”

When asked earlier in the press conference what the overall message would be to the Hutchinson Community College students, Mitte said, “Protect your brand and image, you are cultivating your business, jobs look at you as an individual on social media and what you represent.”

Mitte also wanted to inform students that being aware of who they are and not being afraid to show people their true self is important.

“The people around you set your tone, if you don’t stand up for something, then who will?,” Mitte said. “We only get one chance to show people who and what we are, so stand up for what you believe in, what we believe is all we have.”

 

 

Let’s get political: 2018 midterms

Friday, October 5th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

With midterm elections coming up on Nov. 6, it’s more important than ever to make your voice heard.

There are so many reasons why it’s important to vote, especially as a college student. This generation has the ability to shift the political balance, either way, if they would go to the polls.

Many students are disengaged from political issues, usually because of a distrust in the government or the feeling that their vote doesn’t really matter.

The votes of students are incredibly important. This generation will be the ones to live with whatever changes are made in our government. So, in an attempt to gain some interest before the registration deadline on Oct. 16th, here is a brief summarization of what a few candidates, who will be on the local ballots, stand for.

Kris Kobach (Republican Gubernatorial Candidate):

Education
Direct more money into teacher pay, book, etc.
Develop partnerships with trade schools

Welfare Reform
Provide hand up to less fortunate, not handouts
End welfare fraud and abuse
Create economic environment with high-paying jobs

Government
Enact term limits
Capping property tax appraisals
Low-tax and low regulation policies

Illegal Immigration
End in-state tuition for illegal immigrants
Stop providing welfare for illegal immigrants

Life
Protect, preserve, ensure culture of life in Kansas
Safeguard human life from conception to natural death

2nd Amendment
Safeguard right to bear arms
Preserve concealed carry

Laura Kelly (Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate):

Education
Invest in higher education, technical schools and job training programs
Fund K-12 Schools
Improve Student Mental Health

Economics
Support new industry that leverages our state’s strengths
Encourage rural growth and prosperity
Prioritize investment in Infrastructure

Government
Restore public confidence in Kansas government
Reinstating the Equal Protection for State Workers
Reversing the Adoption Discrimination Bill

Healthcare
Expand Medicaid
Reform KanCare (People over Profit)
Protect Women’s Reproductive Rights

Public Safety
Passing common sense gun legislation
Funding Public Safety

Paul Waggoner (Republican Representative of 104th District):

Education
Bring school financing to the vote of the people
More school choices for underprivileged students

Economics
Remove unnecessary regulations
Make Kansas a desirable place to start a business

Government
Reformation of Kansas Supreme Court Judge selection
Push for governmental transparency

Healthcare
Against Medicaid Expansion
Sanctity of Life and protection of the unborn

Civil Freedoms
Freedom of religious liberty and conscious rights
Freedom of self-defense/right to bear arms

Jason Probst (Democratic Representative of 102nd District and Hutchinson Community College alumus):

Economics
Create good climate for established local business
Find innovative ways to create jobs for neighborhoods
Make Hutchinson a great place to live, work, and start a business

Education
Adequately and equitably fund children’s education
Explore new teaching ideas that benefit students
Work with urban, suburban, and rural districts

Government
Elected Officials must listen to residents
tax policy must be fair and widely spread across the state’s residents
Redistricting must be handled by bipartisan committee

Healthcare
Medicaid expansion would have provided healthcare to 150,000 Kansans
Veto of the bill was “morally repugnant”
Expand Medicaid for families who can’t afford/employer doesn’t cover

Protecting Children
Programs designed to give children safe and stable environment
Investments will produce the next generation of Kansans
Take time now to help children so they prepared for the future

Students: register to vote

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

By Kat Collins
Staff writer

It’s that time of year for the elections, and this year, it’s the midterms.

The Kansas governor race is expected to be close between Republican Kris Kobach and Democrat Laura Kelly. Independent Greg Orman is running as a third candidate.

In the “KLC Journal” it was said “That the number of Kansans not voting could fill Kaufman Stadium 18 times.”

Midterms are generally not a popular time to vote. The amount of people not voting would be about Seven-Thousand  people if it was to fit the Stadium 18 times.  It was also said in the KLC Journal, “That about 45 percent of voters fail to show polls for general elections in Kansas.

Denny Stoecklein, director of marketing for Hutchinson Community College, was asked if the college was doing something to help students get registered, and he said, “This is something that has happened in the past and were checking with folks who were involved then to see what the process was. The opportunity to educate students on voter registration and providing the opportunity for them to do so is something the College would welcome and support.”

The college is willing to help students get what they need to know about the elections coming up in the future, and ot’s pretty much better to vote instead of not. So, if you want to vote go to the courthouse and get registered by Oct. 16, and then vote on Nov. 6.

SkillsUSA helping students for their future

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

By Tabitha Barr
Opinion Page Editor

Skills USA is an organization that started in 1965 to help students better prepare them for their future jobs.

Hutchinson Community college partners with Business and Industry to further the options students can pick from. Through meetings, meeting new people, and competitions, students can gain knowledge and learn what they want to do in their future.

There are more than 100 areas that students can compete in, giving a chance to any student who wants to participate. Their goal is to grant students the opportunity of new knowledge to become “world-class workers, leaders and responsible American Citizens.”

Students who join will get hands-on experience in an area they want to pursue. There are meetings with the whole team, or just a one-on-one meetings with John Pendergrass, who is the sponsor for Hutchinson Community College. These meetings consist giving the students their plan for the year to get them ready for the competition.

This school year’s competition is in April at surrounding Hutchinson areas, mainly the college campus.

During this, students will compete in what area they have chosen, whether that be culinary arts, welding and more. At competition, competitors show up, are given a name tag, locate the designated area based on what the competitor came prepared for, then take a written test to see what they know.

Afterwards, the student will then have to prove they know the material and can do it as well in hands on work.

“It’s not just a written test that you walk away from, you do the written test, and then you go out . . . and perform the task,” Pendergrass said.

The main reason this is important is because at these competitions, a student is most likely being judged by those who can hire them.

These people oversee students who are working hard and proving they can learn and become well knowledgeable in a field they would like to pursue. This is not only just a competition, but a chance to find a job.

If any student would like to join, the team is still open for recruits.

“It’s an ongoing thing,” Pendergrass said.

A student does not have to attend every meeting, but they do need to be a member. These meetings are good for information purposes.

Elections for positions will be held in the next coming months for students who want coordinate and help out the team. The membership does cost a one-time $7 payment before December.

Any student can join the Skills USA team, and it is not limited to certain majors. If a student has the drive to learn more about a specific field, they can do so through this club.

If a student would like to join, contact John Pendergrass to to become a Skills USA team member at pendergrassj@hutchcc.edu or (620)694-2443.

Wouldn’t it be nice to meet The Beach Boys

Friday, September 28th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor-In-Chief

The Kansas State Fair had quite the variety of bands this year.

One such band was The Beach Boys, who recently began their 2018 Now and Then tour in June and came to  Hutchinson on Sept. 15.

Some of the Hutchinson Community College cheerleaders were called on stage to perform with the group to the song, “True to Your School” and had “Fun Fun Fun” doing it.

Lauren Musick, a HutchCC cheerleader from Hutchinson, was one of the girls who went up on stage.

“I was super excited to perform with the band, but the nerves got to me when I saw how big thecrowd was,” said Musick.

Despite her nerves, Musick said, “The experience itself was one I will always remember.”

A Leavenworth native, Brooke Holcomb, was another cheerleader who appeared on stage with The Beach Boys. Holcomb was awestruck upon being onstage with the group.

“It felt like a dream, because they are super famous, and I am a Beach Boys fan,” Holcomb said.

Out of all of the cheerleaders, Holcomb had the closest encounter with Bruce Johnston.

“The lead guitarist put his guitar on me and reached around and started playing while I had it on,” Holcomb said.

Not only did these girls meet them, but they also got to go backstage with The Beach Boys.

“Being backstage, they treated you like royalty,” Holcomb said.

Hannah Moore, McPherson, also enjoyed the encounter with The Beach Boys.

“I was super excited, and you actually couldn’t see many fans because of how bright the lights were, so I feel like that took away a lot of the nervousness,” Moore said.

Moore said that there were about 10 HutchCC cheerleaders invited on stage. When asked about whether or not she was a fan of The Beach Boys, Moore said, “I had heard of them and recognized a lot of their songs.”

Sleep-deprived studentzzzz

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

The lack of sleep affects not only educational success, but physical safety as well. Without the right amount of rest, people are at risk of multiple health issues. Exhaustion can even lead to dangerous situations if not dealt with proactively.

Many students are quickly nearing a downhill slide toward poor health and physical harm. It’s time for them to take an active role in their own sleep habits.

Students don’t always make the best decisions when it comes to their sleep habits. Late night studying, among other things, is one of the biggest factors in these habits. Some students don’t even get to bed until early morning.

Jon Reed, a HutchCC freshman from Hutchinson, says he usually doesn’t get to bed until 2 a.m., and wakes up around 6 a.m. That’s only four hours of sleep.

“I feel like s— when I wake up. Usually have to drink enormous amounts of coffee to get through the day,” Reed said.

Bralen Martin, a Hutchinson sophomore, follows a somewhat similar routine. Usually he’s in bed around 3 a.m. in the morning and up by 9 a.m.

While that’s a bit better, six hours is still not nearly enough to function properly throughout the day. Does he really feel like he is getting enough sleep?

“Sort of. I feel tired in the mornings, but usually wake up as the day goes by,” Martin said.

While “sort of” is better than not, it still goes to show that students aren’t getting enough rest. This can lead to some pretty scary incidents.

“One time I almost fell asleep while driving,” Reed said. “I started to swerve, but caught myself just in time.”

Falling asleep at the wheel is a serious problem, not just for the driver, but for anyone else on the road.

Sleep deprivation can cause lasting health issues as well, both mentally and physically.

Students who get less than seven hours of sleep are more susceptible to anxiety and depression. They are also at risk of weight gain or weight loss, increased blood pressure, and extreme irritability

Lasting effects include hypertension, diabetes and heart problems.

Students should work on prioritizing work and play, as well as designating a specific sleep schedule to keep them on track. It only takes a few weeks to set an internal clock.

Sleep is a necessity for everyone, especially young students. Sleep deprivation won’t just affect grades, but cause lasting health concerns.

Career Zone there to help HutchCC students find work

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

When going to college full time, some find it a tad difficult to find a job best suited for them. Or maybe they do not know the correct way to make a resume.

Some are coming into this having had a job in high school, and some are looking for a job for the first time ever. They might have had a different focus at the time. Either way, there are systems put in place to help achieve whatever goal students are trying to accomplish through Hutchinson Community College.

HutchCC has a service on the main website called Career Zone. It has helped so many students find jobs in the area that are perfect for them. The service helps students search and apply to local and national full-time jobs, part-time jobs, and internship opportunities. It also helps create and upload resume and career portfolio to make available for employers. Students can access event announcements, career advice documents, podcasts, videos and articles. HutchCC also has a work study program if someone is looking to get a job on campus.

When discussing the issue that is getting a decent job and going to school full time with student Brianna MacLean, a Belleville sophomore, she said that if you are wanting to work at a specific place, or have something in mind that is not restaurant or retail related, good luck.

After asking how difficult is it to snag a job while in school, MacLean said that it probably is not that hard, and that you could easily get a job at Walmart, or somewhere like that.

Trying to keep her grades up while working is always a struggle for her. MacLean also said how stressful it is trying to find a place to work in Hutchinson once the school year has already begun. MacLean said good places to apply would be hotels or any retail store. After August rolls around, all the decent jobs are taken, and you are forced to apply at fast food places.

“And no one has a good time doing either of those … ever,” MacLean said.

After asking if she had heard of Career Zone and what help it could be to the students of HutchCC, MacLean was shocked that she had never heard a thing about it.

 

Eight Tips from HutchCC counselor Debra Graber

1. Sometimes you just need a job to give you job experience. Someone to vouch that you are a capable human, other than your parents, teachers or coaches.
2. Find a part-time job, an internship that’s in an area of interest.
3. Apply at as many places as possible.
4. Develop a good resume.
5. Even if you haven’t had a job before you can put what experiences you’ve had, what things are you good at. You can have a resume without having previous job experience.
6. Don’t be picky!
7. Ideally if you could find a job that’s going to match up with some things you’ve done in the past then it’ll be more enjoyable to go to work.
8. Networking, ask instructors, friends, family members. A large percentage of jobs aren’t advertised! It’s word of mouth or recommendations.