Archive for the ‘Features’ Category

Q&A: Catching up with Badinage

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

Neal Allsup

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

Hutchinson Community Colleges jazz group Badinage is a group of students lead by director Neal Allsup, the director of choral activities at HutchCC. After sitting down with him and a couple students to see what the Badinage is all about here’s what was found.

Neal Allsup

EF: How long have you been a jazz instructor?

NA: This is my 31st year.

EF: What kind of awards?

NA: The Downbeat Award is the biggest one yet. We have some pretty impressive credentials. Opened for Tyranny Sutton, for a lot of Grammy winners, like New York Voices, Manhattan Transfer, Take Six.

EF: What do they go through at these festivals?

NA: It’s like a mega classroom. I require them to go to workshops and classes. Getting instruction from professionals, Grammy winners and Grammy nominees. You could never have that type of intensity in a classroom. It gives confirmation that what they’re doing is awesome and at an extremely high level.

EF: What is the largest place you have performed?

NA: Carnegie Hall seven times, or maybe eight, I can’t remember anymore. Eight State of Kansas Music Conventions. These are things you have to submit audition tapes to. We have submitted stuff to the Jazz Entertainment Network conference, JEN.

EF: What kind of performances do you guys have this school year?

NA: Three or four each semester just here in Hutchinson alone. We’re singing with the Hutch Symphony in December. There’s no telling how many performances we’ll have because we get invitations all the time. However, we have too many limitations to do all of them. Limitations like travel funds and time.

EF: How hard is it to do this?

NA: This is the most challenging music; as a singing musician they will perform in their lives. Most of our “heroes” on the radio could never sing this stuff. Doesn’t mean that it’s better, it just means that stuff is basic, and this certainly isn’t. I believe that every music, no matter what, it’s about where it is serves it purpose to express what it means to be human.

EF: If you could say anything to those out there thinking about joining the group, what would it be?

NA: It would be a wonderful challenge. They aren’t going to have muscles that are sore, but it works their brain. It will work their character. Expect that, if you don’t dig that? It probably will be a chore to you. If you really dig a challenge and you’re not a quitter, that you have substance within you that says “I will persevere” then that’s a place for you.

Sara Schlicklau, Pretty Prairie Sophomore

EF: How long have you been in it?

SS: This sophomore year.

EF: How long have you been singing?

SS: Since I was little bitty, first time I remember performing was in 4th grade.

EF: How did you join?

SS: Emailed Neal for about a year, saw the group perform and decided I had to be apart of the group.

EF: How would you get the word out you guys exist?

SS: Have more of a social media presence.

Bailey Graber, Pretty Prairie Sophomore

EF: How long have you been in it?

SS: This is my second year.

EF: How long have you been singing?

SS: I’ve been singing for as long as I can remember. I grew up singing with my parents in church and fell in love with it.

EF: How did you join?

SS: I first heard about the jazz groups because my older brother was a part of it. I knew it was something I wanted to do after hearing them the first time. I contacted Neal and set up a time to meet with him and have an audition of sorts.

EF: How would you get the word out you guys exist?

SS: We try to hang up posters around school and places in Hutch to get the word out. It’s sad how many people, on campus even, haven’t heard of us, especially considering all the accomplishments these jazz groups have made through the years.

EF: How many times a week do you guys meet? How long?

SS: We meet Tuesdays and Thursdays for an hour and a half, which really isn’t a ton of time together, so we do a lot of practicing on our own outside of class time.

EF: How many performances this year?

SS: We have a few concerts that we do in the BJ Warner performance hall which are free to students if they bring their ID.   We’d love to have people come to these, and the others around the community!

EF: What do you need to do to join Badinage?

SS: To be in a jazz group, you have to first be in choir. There are choir scholarships available and so if you are in jazz you may just get a bit more money in your choir scholarship, and that counts for jazz. It’s just not separate. If there is anyone out who is interested, don’t hesitate to pursue it. It’s been an amazing experience and I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

D.C. – A trip of a lifetime

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Kat Collins
Staff writer

Coming in June, 2019 is a trip of a lifetime for Hutchinson Community College students to Washington. Students will visit famous buildings, monuments, memorials and museums in our nation’s capital for five days.

Some of the stops will be the White House, the Washington Monument, the Lincoln Memorial, the National Mall, and The Tomb of The Unknown Soldier. Plus, students will get the chance to tour Arlington National Cemetery, Mount Vernon and Gettysburg.

Students will be traveling with Hutchinson Community College’s travel partner, EF Explore America. On this trip, students get round trip air travel from Wichita to Washington, breakfast every morning and two upscale group dinners. There will be a round-the-clock tour director, who meet the students who will enroll at the airport. There will be licensed Tour Guides for all your stops, A charter bus and driver, tips & gratuities, admission to attractions, dedicated security while you’re at the hotel, illness and accident insurance, 24-hour emergency assistance, and experienced tour leadership.

The college has limited the amount of the travelers to 42, and as of now there are 22 travelers set to go on this trip so far. The cost for this trip depends on how many people enroll for this trip. So, if the number of travelers going rises to 25, 30, or 35 people the price gets lowered.

This past May, Kristen Pearce, Logan Porter and Ben Hiebert had traveled with HutchCC to Barcelona, Spain, and are planning to go on this trip to Washington DC also.

As said by HutchCC business instructor Dan Naccarato ,“Travel is not only fun, it is the best way to learn and build self-confidence. The places we visit become part of who we are. They stay with us forever, whatever we do.”  This should be a great trip!

For all details and to enroll, simply visit our HutchCC Explore America group website, efexploreamerica.com/2152102DP

EF Explore America Travel Support Team phone number is (888)-333-9756

This app can net you Qapital gains

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Campus Editor

Editor’s note – Campus Editor Pablo Sanchez will periodically take a look at and review money-saving apps that could be of use to students.

There are tons of money saving apps out there, whether it’s using McDonalds, Subway, Sonic or financial aid.

At the Google Play Store, there is an app called Qapital, and the most important thing is that the app is free, doesn’t require a credit card and will keep track of your credit score.

Qapital will help you and give tips on how that works as well. Qapital keeps track of your spending and upcoming bills which will allow you to choose how you want to spend your money whether it’s going out to eat or traveling.

Qapital also has a desktop version as well, in which banking information is still saved and you’re able to print out spreadsheets, Qapital breaks down your spending for you and gives tips on how to learn to spend money wisely.

If there is a problem, customer support is quick and helpful. For college students it will make things easier, the process is simple and all you need to do is link your bank information and debit card.

The app will allow you to make plans to reach your goal, whether it’s going out to eat, traveling, getting out of student-load debt, or something else.

Setting limits to spend is always important as a student, and at the end of the week it will tell you how much money you’ve saved. Invite friends and get $5 for free. Overall, the app has weekly updates. The app can assist in direct deposit, too, so if you’re looking to save money, set goals and get good credit, Qapital is for you

High school vs. college security

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

In today’s climate, it is nearly impossible to enter a high school without following the proper protocols. The doors remain locked, visitors must sign in and anything suspicious is immediately reported.

After experiencing these levels of security, students may be shocked by how open Hutchinson Community College seems to be. With the current rise of active shootes, students need to stay aware of safety protocols on campus. How do they compare with high school protocols?

Katherine Sheldon, a freshman from Hutchinson, had this to say about her high school security. “I mean, we would lock doors, and only have one entrance where you could actually get in. We didn’t really have any security guards, we just had the local police.”

The school would have drills every so often where the doors would be locked, lights turned off, and all the students would hide so they were not visible through the window on the door.

When asked about the comparison between HutchCC and her high school, she began to notice some possible issues.

“I mean, the doors aren’t locked, like, at all,” Sheldon said. “It’s easier to get into buildings and the teachers haven’t told us safety protocols for a situation like that.”

She said she assumes that students would follow the same protocols at a high school – lock the doors and hide. She doesn’t know for sure though, and that has her worried. She had a few ideas that she believes would make the campus safer.

“I mean, I don’t know if they have video cameras or anything like that in the hallways, but that would help,” Sheldon said. “Maybe make it more difficult for people to get into the buildings.”

Steve Dunmire, Lead Security Officer, shared some of his knowledge on the protocols here, as well as possible security measures that could be added.

“It can get sort of complicated since the students are adults and we can’t force a decision on how to act,” Dunmire said, describing the difficulties of an active shooter situation.

He has the ability to send alerts over the phone, but that can take a few minutes to reach everyone. According to him, the best way to respond is the “run, hide, or fight” response.

If you can escape campus, do so quickly. If not, find a room to hide in and barricade the door. You can kick out a window if the room has one and escape through it. As a last resort, improvise a weapon and fight your way out of the situation.

“Chairs and tables can make good makeshift weapons. Women’s purses can actually be a good source for improvised weapons. They are usually filled with all sorts of sharp objects,” Dunmire said.

Dunmire has his own ideas on how the campus could be made safer for situations like this.

“I’ve talked about having a campus police department, as well as adding more security cameras,” Dunmire said. “However, it all comes down to money.”

There is still a suggested safety protocol to follow in an active shooter situation, and all the information can be found on DragonZone.

“Of course, if they pick up a paper and read this article, that would definitely help,” Dunmire said.

Bringing comfort to campus: students need a special taste of home when moving to Hutchinson

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Editor-In-Chief

Any college can be intimidating or uncomfortable the first week or two. Going to a new school, city, state, or even country, adapting can be challenging to some who have troubles getting used to a new environment.

Each Hutchinson Community College student has his or her own way of coping and getting accustomed to campus.

For some, it could be bringing a favorite blanket, picture of a loved one, or even a stuffed animal that has gotten them through many of life’s difficulties. There are also students who are well-adapted to their surroundings and don’t necessarily need an object to ease them into a new atmosphere.

Rachel Lyons, a Newton freshman, has two items she brings with her when she travels.

“I bring my bear and sometimes my Winnie the Pooh blanket whenever I go to a new place” Lyons said. “I’ve had both for many years, the blanket ever since I was in preschool and the bear since I was 1-year-old.”

She said that they are both items she has had forever, so they make her feel more at-home.

Another female student living in the dorms who brings valuable items with her when she settles in a new place is Shaylei Davis, a Jetmore freshman.

“I brought a ton of pictures of my family and friends and a stuffed dog I’ve had literally my whole life,” Davis said.

Along with the pictures and stuffed animal, Davis shared that she brought a figurine given to her by her grandma that reminds her of her dog at home.

“It’s what I’m used to,” Davis said. “All the little decorations I have hold a reason behind, so they are special to me.”

Not only females take belongings from home with them to college, but male students do as well, although they seem to hide it better.

Justin McMurry, a Halstead sophomore, shared the memento he brings from home – a World War II blanket given to him by his uncle when he was 15.

“It’s nice, heavy, and makes me feel safe when I sleep,” McMurry said.

When asked why he is so fond of the blanket, McMurry said, “The reason I cherish it so much is because my uncle means a lot to me, and he originally gave the blanket to my dad, who then gave it to me.”

McMurry agreed that when it comes to being sentimental, men tend not to admit feelings of an item, whereas women generally don’t mind.

“Girls would rather have pictures, stuffed animals, and pillows, whereas guys normally have video games and trinkets they don’t like to talk about,” McMurry said.

Whether or not students bring items symbolizing home to the dorms, the point is to be comfortable. There are students who just need companionship or a daily routine to feel more at ease.

Others like these three students, like to bring mementos from home to feel like wherever they go, will become another home.

Students share thoughts on cafeteria food

Friday, September 7th, 2018

By Emily Fehrman
Social Media Editor

When you think about cafeteria food often times nothing good comes to mind.

You think back to high school and how terrible the food could be. For some it doesn’t get any better in college.

Cafeterias can be known for the lack of options and lack of healthy food. Three Hutchinson Community College students who live in the dorms were asked what they thought about the food that HutchCC is serving its students and staff.

DJ Mitchell, a sophomore from Washington was asked how many times he eats at the cafeteria compared to fast food. Mitchell said he eats the cafeteria food for almost every meal but that he does eat fast food roughly once a week.

He also has a lot of microwavable food back at his dorm that he eats for meals also. After asking if he actually enjoyed the food served at HutchCC, Mitchell said, “Not really, but I suck it up and eat it.”

The second student was Hannah Hoheisel, a freshman from Garden Plain. Hoheisel splits her time at the cafeteria with how much she eats out, roughly three times a week at both. She said that she would eat there more if there were more options for healthier foods. Hoheisel then said “there needs to be more vegetable options, more fresh fruit. The food makes me feel gross.”

She also said eating at the cafeteria feels awkward when she is alone, and that is why she prefers to eat downstairs in the Parker Student Union at the Blue Dragons Grill. The one good thing about the cafeteria Hoheisel said is that you can eat as much of it as you want.

The last student was Chiani Pearce, Atwood freshman. Pearce eats the cafeteria food five times a week, twice a day. But she also eats out five times a week, mainly because there are not any fast food places back home for her to eat at.

Pearce does buy a lot of groceries at Aldi, she said “Everybody goes to Aldi because it’s so cheap.”

Pearce then goes on to say, “It has nothing to do with the cafeteria, I like that there is so many options.”

However, she said she would not complain if there was more fruits and vegetables available.

The conscious seems to be that the cafeteria food is not terrible but that it has a lot of improvements to be made.

Baseball team ready for some ‘clubhouse jacks’

Monday, May 7th, 2018

A look inside the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A broken window and peeling paint are prominent at the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A wind gust blew off a set of lights near right field at Hobart-Detter Field, damaging a bathroom.

The light pole that lost the lights during a wind storm.

A look at the current clubhouse being built beyond the left-field wall.

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

The Hutchinson Community College baseball team is expecting a new clubhouse soon. It has been long overdue for this installment at Hobart-Detter Field.

The new amenities featured in the clubhouse, which will be located about 50 feet behind the left-field fence, include – a new maintenance facility for half of the building, and the other half will be used as a locker room, laundry area, bathroom, coaches’ office and umpire locker room.

The clubhouse will also be used by the Hutchinson Monarchs, a summer collegiate wood-bat baseball team.

“The city is funding the building,” said HutchCC baseball coach Ryan Schmidt. “We are extremely excited about the building.”

Schmidt also said that the new building will help compete against others in the Blue Dragons’ conference – the Jayhawk West – that have modern clubhouses and enhance help in recruiting.

“We can’t thank the City of Hutchinson enough for seeing this project through and giving our players a great space to call home,” Schmidt said.

The old clubhouse with its busted windows and chipped paint looks just as bad on the inside as it does on the outside. In addition to chipped paint and broken windows is a foul odor wafting inside the clubhouse.

The team is looking forward to having a location for private meetings and more room for equipment.

HutchCC freshman, Dylan Nedved said, “I’m so excited for it, we’re going to hit a lot of clubhouse jacks. We’re going to put some holes in that roof.”

Nedved said the phrase, “clubhouse jacks” is an inside joke and another way of saying hitting home runs that hit the roof of the clubhouse.

Another freshman, Cameron Crandall, shared his excitement for the new clubhouse.

“I think everyone will realize how much space we have now instead of being crowded in our old one,” Crandall said.

Along with the new clubhouse being built, new light fixtures are expected to be put on the field within a year. Damage from the wind April 18 caused one set of lights to fall on the first-base-side restroom building at the baseball field. Only about one-third of the roof was damaged.

 

 

Retiring EMS advisor reflects on teaching career

Monday, May 7th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Online Editor

Dan Jones is a Hutchinson Community College Emergency Medical Service advisor and has been helping out students and helping them make their dreams come true.
Jones has worked at the college for more than 20 years, teaching even as he continued to work in hospitals and with patients.
“I was ready for a change in that point in my life, and so I become a clinical coordinator, and so I would go around Wichita, Salina and Hutch and take students to their clinical settings in the hospital, because that was my area of expertise,” Jones said. “Then I got interested in the classroom, I got my instructor license, in the state to teach in. I got that in 1986, and so I kind of liked going in the classroom, and that was around 2000.
Jones said he worked in the Emergency Medical Technician field, and EMS was the embodiment of medical.
“Doing it on the wing and a prayer, and you don’t have the doctors and the people in the field to help you, and I thought it was interesting,” Jones said. “EMS is more of a specialty area, a jack-of-all-trades. They were the specialty in the crisis situation, so I was always thought that was interesting within EMS.
Jones said he had a lot of students through the years, and he had to change his approach on how kids learned. He said it was a challenge at times, that’s one reason why he wanted to retire.
“It’s getting harder, all the changes, one thing in especially in EMS and medicine and education is that there’s change, and it’s getting a bit harder on the change. I still go with the flow, but it’s been an interesting 23 years at the college. I’ve had different roles, but my favorite would be the classroom.”
Not to say the classroom was easy, but Jones said it was rewarding.
“I’ve had kids with challenges, and they overcome the challenges to get through, and you knew that they wouldn’t be a paramedic. They knew their spot, and would be a good EMT. With specific ones – there have been too many to pick out – but I had one and you could tell she was smart, and it went in the classroom socially inept, and through the class, she really came a long way, and I’ve helped her along the way with that. She’s a paramedic now, and there was a time where I thought I don’t know if she was going to make it or not. But if it’s something I learned, it’s not to give up too early.”

Tony Award 2018 outlook

Thursday, May 3rd, 2018

For my final column with The Collegian, I’d like to discuss my favorite form of entertainment – the theatre.
As a theatre major, one award show I look forward to the most (even more than the Oscars) is the Tonys. Now, theatre people may not watch the Tonys, but they should. The Tonys celebrate the best work in the theatre world, all with live performances that never cease to amaze and impress. This year’s ceremony is June 10, and is hosted by Sara Barellies and Josh Groban. If you’ve never watched this award show, give it a try. Here is a look at some of the shows that may come up during the ceremony:

  1. “Mean Girls”: The totally fetch musical that starred Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams and Tina Fey is now an even more fetch Broadway musical. With a book written by Fey herself, it is a non-stop laugh party. The music is just as infectious and is sung by a stellar cast including new Tony nominees Taylor Louderman, Grey Henson and Ashley Park. The show picked up 12 nominations (tied for the most this year) and is a top contender to take home the Tony for Best Musical. (side note: I’m rooting for them to win.)
  2. “SpongeBob Squarepants The Musical”: SpongeBob, Patrick and the whole Bikini Bottom gang make a move from under the sea to the great white way. I’ll admit, when I heard this was happening, I laughed it off and expected it to flop. However, the show has garnered critical acclaim with many praises for the cast, music and technical designs. The music has a lot of celebrity writers, including Sara Barellies, Lady Antebellum, Panic! At the Disco, David Bowie, John Legend and the Flaming Lips. Expect SpongeBob and the gang to make a splash this year.
  3. “Angels in America”: Perhaps one of the best plays of all time, “Angels in America” has returned to Broadway with leading man Andrew Garfield. After a celebrated run in England, the show made a transfer to Broadway and has provided a beautiful update to this play, which centers on the AIDS epidemic and homophobia. The show plays over seven hours long, but many people have said it was not only worth it, but an enrichment experience, too. The show was nominated for 11 Tony Awards, and is expected to take home best play revival.
  4. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”: That’s right, our favorite boy who lived is now playing on Broadway. The wizarding world has come to life like never before in this captivating musical following Harry Potter’s son. The show has already become one of the most successful shows in Britain and will most likely be on Broadway for quite some time. Good luck getting tickets though. Not only is it sold out, but tickets are $500, the most expensive show currently on Broadway. The show was nominated for 10 Tony Awards and will take home best play, no question.
  5. “The Bands Visit”: After a mix up, a band from Egypt is lost in Israel and bond with the locals, all while performing beautiful numbers of love and lost. This new musical is nominated for 11 Tony Awards and was an early frontrunner for best new musical.
  6. “Frozen”: Elsa freezes up Broadway in this adaptation of the Disney classic. Famous songs such as “Let It Go” and “Love Is an Open Door” have made their stage debuts along with new songs, such as a new Elsa anthem, “Monster.” But don’t forget about the infectious Ana, Olaf and Kristoph, as they all make their claim in the show. Nominated for three Tony Awards, this show is sure to melt your heart at the Tonys.

Other shows to look forward to seeing a glimpse of include revivals of “My Fair Lady”, “Carousel”, and “Once on This Island.” Don’t forget about the play categories with old favorites like “Lobby Hero” and “The Iceman Cometh”, and new plays like “The Children” and “Farinelli and the King”. Other nominated celebrities include Denzel Washington, Amy Schumer, Michael Cera and Laurie Metcalf. And don’t forget to tune into the Tony Awards June 10 on CBS affiliates.

Badinage vocal jazz earns international award

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

Badinage, the prestigious vocal jazz group of Hutchinson Community College, has wrapped up their year with international recognition after being awarded the Downbeat 41st Annual Student Music Award for large group vocal jazz ensemble.

Downbeat Magazine has covered only the best jazz performers since its beginning in 1934. The award, though well-deserved, came as a pleasant surprise to Director Neal Allsup, who decided to submit the group’s work for the first time this year.

“Badinage has not missed a man-hour of rehearsal in 23 years,” Allsup said. “If they’re ill, they still want to come in and sit in the corner and rehearse. That’s how dedicated they are to their craft and to be able to produce a product that is worthy of a Downbeat award. We’ve had seven Carnegie Hall performances and we’ve been to JEN in the past. It’s not like we’ve all of a sudden made it. The awards we’ve got this year really are on the backs of all those wonderful, incredible students I’ve had over the last 20, 30 years.”

Each member of Badinage will receive a certificate to recognize their accomplishments. The group will also be featured in the June edition of the magazine, alongside several of the top jazz schools in the world.

“This award really is about the program,” Allsup said. “We’ve been doing this for over 20 years. It’s just that this year there has been a lot of opportunity and a lot of things that have come our way.”

In the future, Allsup plans to enter the group for more Downbeat categories including small group and ensembles.

However, Allsup emphasizes that it’s not just this year’s group that should be proud of the award. He believes that each group’s talent continues to shine through year-to-year.

“These vocal jazz singers, especially Badinage, they’ve been cranking it out like this for more than 20 years,” Allsup said. “This year we had a vocal jazz reunion inviting back students from the last thirty years to come to campus and we spent a whole weekend just remembering and rehearsing for a concert.”

Allsup said he hopes to host another vocal jazz reunion in another five years.

Badinage was also invited to perform at the most important international conference, The Jazz Educators Network, in Dallas, where only six schools are chosen to perform.

Only a few high schools in Kansas offer vocal jazz classes, so for most students, HutchCC is their first experience with the genre.

Next year, every member of Badinage is expected to return along with any incoming freshmen who make the cut.

“We may have to start a third group,” Allsup said. “My job is to go out and find outstanding musicianship.”

Students interested in joining are encouraged to audition, where, if they make the cut, will then be placed in either Badinage, or Allsup’s other equally-talented group, Sonance.

The group performs two major concerts at the college each semester, in addition to smaller performances at nursing homes and hospitals in the community.

“Next week we will go to a dementia and Alzheimer’s unit, and we’ll sit in a great big circle with them to sing,” Allsup said. “It’s one of the most touching and memorable performances.”

Badinage also travels to one conference each year, although they are often invited to perform at many other places across nation and world.

“We’ve had invitations to sing at festivals in Monteux, Switzerland, Cuba, Brazil, Japan,” Allsup said. “It’s amazing the kind of invitations we receive.”

Many of those invitations must be turned down but, with the new international recognition from Downbeat, the group will likely be flooded with additional attention.

The group’s work doesn’t end there. They also open for professional groups at the local Fox Theatre.

“Badinage came back early from Spring Break to open for ten-time Grammy winning group, Manhattan Transfer,” Allsup said.

Manhattan Transfer, the multi-Grammy winning jazz group that has been performing since 1969, was in awe of HutchCC’s badinage group, Allsup said.

The group also recently released a new song which, although the sheet music will not likely be available for several years, Badinage students worked hard to transcribe the song for their own performance.

“We’re the best kept secret in the town,” Allsup said.

For anyone interested in donating to the group or receiving an album of some of Badinage’s work, they can contact Neal Allsup in Stringer Fine Art’s Center.