Archive for the ‘Features’ Category

Baseball team ready for some ‘clubhouse jacks’

Monday, May 7th, 2018

A look inside the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A broken window and peeling paint are prominent at the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A wind gust blew off a set of lights near right field at Hobart-Detter Field, damaging a bathroom.

The light pole that lost the lights during a wind storm.

A look at the current clubhouse being built beyond the left-field wall.

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

The Hutchinson Community College baseball team is expecting a new clubhouse soon. It has been long overdue for this installment at Hobart-Detter Field.

The new amenities featured in the clubhouse, which will be located about 50 feet behind the left-field fence, include – a new maintenance facility for half of the building, and the other half will be used as a locker room, laundry area, bathroom, coaches’ office and umpire locker room.

The clubhouse will also be used by the Hutchinson Monarchs, a summer collegiate wood-bat baseball team.

“The city is funding the building,” said HutchCC baseball coach Ryan Schmidt. “We are extremely excited about the building.”

Schmidt also said that the new building will help compete against others in the Blue Dragons’ conference – the Jayhawk West – that have modern clubhouses and enhance help in recruiting.

“We can’t thank the City of Hutchinson enough for seeing this project through and giving our players a great space to call home,” Schmidt said.

The old clubhouse with its busted windows and chipped paint looks just as bad on the inside as it does on the outside. In addition to chipped paint and broken windows is a foul odor wafting inside the clubhouse.

The team is looking forward to having a location for private meetings and more room for equipment.

HutchCC freshman, Dylan Nedved said, “I’m so excited for it, we’re going to hit a lot of clubhouse jacks. We’re going to put some holes in that roof.”

Nedved said the phrase, “clubhouse jacks” is an inside joke and another way of saying hitting home runs that hit the roof of the clubhouse.

Another freshman, Cameron Crandall, shared his excitement for the new clubhouse.

“I think everyone will realize how much space we have now instead of being crowded in our old one,” Crandall said.

Along with the new clubhouse being built, new light fixtures are expected to be put on the field within a year. Damage from the wind April 18 caused one set of lights to fall on the first-base-side restroom building at the baseball field. Only about one-third of the roof was damaged.

 

 

Retiring EMS advisor reflects on teaching career

Monday, May 7th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Online Editor

Dan Jones is a Hutchinson Community College Emergency Medical Service advisor and has been helping out students and helping them make their dreams come true.
Jones has worked at the college for more than 20 years, teaching even as he continued to work in hospitals and with patients.
“I was ready for a change in that point in my life, and so I become a clinical coordinator, and so I would go around Wichita, Salina and Hutch and take students to their clinical settings in the hospital, because that was my area of expertise,” Jones said. “Then I got interested in the classroom, I got my instructor license, in the state to teach in. I got that in 1986, and so I kind of liked going in the classroom, and that was around 2000.
Jones said he worked in the Emergency Medical Technician field, and EMS was the embodiment of medical.
“Doing it on the wing and a prayer, and you don’t have the doctors and the people in the field to help you, and I thought it was interesting,” Jones said. “EMS is more of a specialty area, a jack-of-all-trades. They were the specialty in the crisis situation, so I was always thought that was interesting within EMS.
Jones said he had a lot of students through the years, and he had to change his approach on how kids learned. He said it was a challenge at times, that’s one reason why he wanted to retire.
“It’s getting harder, all the changes, one thing in especially in EMS and medicine and education is that there’s change, and it’s getting a bit harder on the change. I still go with the flow, but it’s been an interesting 23 years at the college. I’ve had different roles, but my favorite would be the classroom.”
Not to say the classroom was easy, but Jones said it was rewarding.
“I’ve had kids with challenges, and they overcome the challenges to get through, and you knew that they wouldn’t be a paramedic. They knew their spot, and would be a good EMT. With specific ones – there have been too many to pick out – but I had one and you could tell she was smart, and it went in the classroom socially inept, and through the class, she really came a long way, and I’ve helped her along the way with that. She’s a paramedic now, and there was a time where I thought I don’t know if she was going to make it or not. But if it’s something I learned, it’s not to give up too early.”

Tony Award 2018 outlook

Thursday, May 3rd, 2018

For my final column with The Collegian, I’d like to discuss my favorite form of entertainment – the theatre.
As a theatre major, one award show I look forward to the most (even more than the Oscars) is the Tonys. Now, theatre people may not watch the Tonys, but they should. The Tonys celebrate the best work in the theatre world, all with live performances that never cease to amaze and impress. This year’s ceremony is June 10, and is hosted by Sara Barellies and Josh Groban. If you’ve never watched this award show, give it a try. Here is a look at some of the shows that may come up during the ceremony:

  1. “Mean Girls”: The totally fetch musical that starred Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams and Tina Fey is now an even more fetch Broadway musical. With a book written by Fey herself, it is a non-stop laugh party. The music is just as infectious and is sung by a stellar cast including new Tony nominees Taylor Louderman, Grey Henson and Ashley Park. The show picked up 12 nominations (tied for the most this year) and is a top contender to take home the Tony for Best Musical. (side note: I’m rooting for them to win.)
  2. “SpongeBob Squarepants The Musical”: SpongeBob, Patrick and the whole Bikini Bottom gang make a move from under the sea to the great white way. I’ll admit, when I heard this was happening, I laughed it off and expected it to flop. However, the show has garnered critical acclaim with many praises for the cast, music and technical designs. The music has a lot of celebrity writers, including Sara Barellies, Lady Antebellum, Panic! At the Disco, David Bowie, John Legend and the Flaming Lips. Expect SpongeBob and the gang to make a splash this year.
  3. “Angels in America”: Perhaps one of the best plays of all time, “Angels in America” has returned to Broadway with leading man Andrew Garfield. After a celebrated run in England, the show made a transfer to Broadway and has provided a beautiful update to this play, which centers on the AIDS epidemic and homophobia. The show plays over seven hours long, but many people have said it was not only worth it, but an enrichment experience, too. The show was nominated for 11 Tony Awards, and is expected to take home best play revival.
  4. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”: That’s right, our favorite boy who lived is now playing on Broadway. The wizarding world has come to life like never before in this captivating musical following Harry Potter’s son. The show has already become one of the most successful shows in Britain and will most likely be on Broadway for quite some time. Good luck getting tickets though. Not only is it sold out, but tickets are $500, the most expensive show currently on Broadway. The show was nominated for 10 Tony Awards and will take home best play, no question.
  5. “The Bands Visit”: After a mix up, a band from Egypt is lost in Israel and bond with the locals, all while performing beautiful numbers of love and lost. This new musical is nominated for 11 Tony Awards and was an early frontrunner for best new musical.
  6. “Frozen”: Elsa freezes up Broadway in this adaptation of the Disney classic. Famous songs such as “Let It Go” and “Love Is an Open Door” have made their stage debuts along with new songs, such as a new Elsa anthem, “Monster.” But don’t forget about the infectious Ana, Olaf and Kristoph, as they all make their claim in the show. Nominated for three Tony Awards, this show is sure to melt your heart at the Tonys.

Other shows to look forward to seeing a glimpse of include revivals of “My Fair Lady”, “Carousel”, and “Once on This Island.” Don’t forget about the play categories with old favorites like “Lobby Hero” and “The Iceman Cometh”, and new plays like “The Children” and “Farinelli and the King”. Other nominated celebrities include Denzel Washington, Amy Schumer, Michael Cera and Laurie Metcalf. And don’t forget to tune into the Tony Awards June 10 on CBS affiliates.

Badinage vocal jazz earns international award

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

Badinage, the prestigious vocal jazz group of Hutchinson Community College, has wrapped up their year with international recognition after being awarded the Downbeat 41st Annual Student Music Award for large group vocal jazz ensemble.

Downbeat Magazine has covered only the best jazz performers since its beginning in 1934. The award, though well-deserved, came as a pleasant surprise to Director Neal Allsup, who decided to submit the group’s work for the first time this year.

“Badinage has not missed a man-hour of rehearsal in 23 years,” Allsup said. “If they’re ill, they still want to come in and sit in the corner and rehearse. That’s how dedicated they are to their craft and to be able to produce a product that is worthy of a Downbeat award. We’ve had seven Carnegie Hall performances and we’ve been to JEN in the past. It’s not like we’ve all of a sudden made it. The awards we’ve got this year really are on the backs of all those wonderful, incredible students I’ve had over the last 20, 30 years.”

Each member of Badinage will receive a certificate to recognize their accomplishments. The group will also be featured in the June edition of the magazine, alongside several of the top jazz schools in the world.

“This award really is about the program,” Allsup said. “We’ve been doing this for over 20 years. It’s just that this year there has been a lot of opportunity and a lot of things that have come our way.”

In the future, Allsup plans to enter the group for more Downbeat categories including small group and ensembles.

However, Allsup emphasizes that it’s not just this year’s group that should be proud of the award. He believes that each group’s talent continues to shine through year-to-year.

“These vocal jazz singers, especially Badinage, they’ve been cranking it out like this for more than 20 years,” Allsup said. “This year we had a vocal jazz reunion inviting back students from the last thirty years to come to campus and we spent a whole weekend just remembering and rehearsing for a concert.”

Allsup said he hopes to host another vocal jazz reunion in another five years.

Badinage was also invited to perform at the most important international conference, The Jazz Educators Network, in Dallas, where only six schools are chosen to perform.

Only a few high schools in Kansas offer vocal jazz classes, so for most students, HutchCC is their first experience with the genre.

Next year, every member of Badinage is expected to return along with any incoming freshmen who make the cut.

“We may have to start a third group,” Allsup said. “My job is to go out and find outstanding musicianship.”

Students interested in joining are encouraged to audition, where, if they make the cut, will then be placed in either Badinage, or Allsup’s other equally-talented group, Sonance.

The group performs two major concerts at the college each semester, in addition to smaller performances at nursing homes and hospitals in the community.

“Next week we will go to a dementia and Alzheimer’s unit, and we’ll sit in a great big circle with them to sing,” Allsup said. “It’s one of the most touching and memorable performances.”

Badinage also travels to one conference each year, although they are often invited to perform at many other places across nation and world.

“We’ve had invitations to sing at festivals in Monteux, Switzerland, Cuba, Brazil, Japan,” Allsup said. “It’s amazing the kind of invitations we receive.”

Many of those invitations must be turned down but, with the new international recognition from Downbeat, the group will likely be flooded with additional attention.

The group’s work doesn’t end there. They also open for professional groups at the local Fox Theatre.

“Badinage came back early from Spring Break to open for ten-time Grammy winning group, Manhattan Transfer,” Allsup said.

Manhattan Transfer, the multi-Grammy winning jazz group that has been performing since 1969, was in awe of HutchCC’s badinage group, Allsup said.

The group also recently released a new song which, although the sheet music will not likely be available for several years, Badinage students worked hard to transcribe the song for their own performance.

“We’re the best kept secret in the town,” Allsup said.

For anyone interested in donating to the group or receiving an album of some of Badinage’s work, they can contact Neal Allsup in Stringer Fine Art’s Center.

Looking to transfer? Lau knows how

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Staff writer

The sun is finally out, the weather is getting warmer, and that can only mean one thing. Summer.

But, there are some things to be accomplished before summer officially begins. For many Hutchinson Community College students that means preparing for their next journey – transferring to another college.

Many students are already stressed with finals around the corner that transferring is on the back burner. Transferring can be stressful, because potential transfers may not know where to start. Not to worry. HutchCC’s very own coordinator of advising, Christopher Lau, answered some questions that students might have.

Q: What should HutchCC students planning to transfer this fall get done now? By May? By June?

A: At this point, there are several things that a transfer student would have already completed – visiting the transfer school, applying for admission and being accepted, completing the FAFSA and any scholarship applications, etc. So, at this point, the transfer student would need to finish strong and do well on his or her classes for the remainder of this semester. After graduation, the student will want to send an official transcript with all courses completed to the transfer school through the National Student Clearinghouse.

There is a link available to do this through DragonZone. For more information, students can visit http://www.hutchcc.edu/administration/records/transcript-request.

Next, during the summer, the student may be required to attend an orientation or transition event at the university.

Q: What should students who want to transfer this fall but aren’t sure where to transfer know?

A: Get in contact with your advisor now. While it may not be too late to transfer to a university, some universities have already awarded transfer scholarships and there may not be scholarship funding available.

Q: What resources are available at HutchCC to figure out the right school to transfer to?

A: If a student is undecided, he or she can talk with his or her advisor about colleges and universities in Kansas, the difference between private and public universities, which transfer schools offer the program a student is interested in, etc.

The Student Success Center in the Parker Student Union maintains a small transfer resource area with information from various transfer schools. Finally, many colleges and universities set up tables in high-traffic buildings on campus where students can ask questions of admissions representatives.

In addition to applying, being accepted, completing your FAFSA, and keeping up your current grades there is still more to be done. Students want to make sure that school they are transferring is the right school for them. One way to do this to go on a campus visit.

Chad Steinkamp, assistant Director of Admissions at Wichita State University said, “A campus visit can be a huge determining factor on where a student goes to school. It really can make or break your decision. Also, it is a great way to get additional information about campus that you might not already know.”

Moving to a new city, or even state can be intimidating. Especially coming for a community college, moving to a state college might me a big change for some students.

“When transferring to a state college there will be a few more people around and, in your classes, compared to community college but there are also many opportunities to get involved and meet new people,” Steinkamp said. “The last two or three years of college is really the time where you make the big decisions on what your career goals are, and WSU and other state schools can help you with that.”

However, there is one last thing to consider when transferring schools, and that is how do your classes transfer? The last thing anyone wants at this point is to have paid for classes that do not transfer the way you want them to.

For those students transferring to Wichita State University, they have a new transfer portal.

“The portal is called the transfer gateway and students can get to it by going to www.wichita.edu/transfergateway,” Steinkamp said. “Transfer students can put in all their classes they have taken at Hutch CC or about to take and the gateway will show them how it will transfer to us and how many credits they have left to get their degree with us.”

Students who are unable to decided were to transfer from should explore all their options.

Scenes from Monday’s Spring Fling

Tuesday, April 24th, 2018

Photos by Brenna Eller

The fellas claimed to be the winners. Checking to confirm.

The “winners” celebrate their victory. They claimed victory, at least. Checking to confirm …

Action packed race! Much like the Daytona 500!

Student publications rake in awards after hard year’s work

Friday, April 20th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

The Hutchinson Community College publications, the Dragon’s Tale magazine and The Hutchinson Collegian has made its mark on Kansas journalism after receiving multiple high awards at the April 8-9 Kansas Collegiate Media conference.

The Hutchinson Collegian and Dragon’s Tale Magazine rallied their staff members to attend the conference during a two day stay at the Drury Inn in Wichita.

In addition to several staff awards, many individual staff members received recognition for their hard work throughout the school year.

College newspapers, yearbooks, and magazines throughout Kansas submit their top works, ranging from news stories to web design, in hopes of being selected as the top entry in each category.

All two year colleges compete against one another, while four year colleges and four year private colleges have their own separate divisions. However, several overall awards were also given which allow schools of all sizes to compete against one another.

In addition to the awards ceremonies, which took place over the course of dinner on Saturday and lunch on Sunday, students were encouraged to mingle with other student journalists from across the state and attend different lectures from local professional journalists.

AWARDS WON

Two-Year College Division Journalist of the Year

Winner – Merissa Anderson

Runner-up – Allie Schweizer

All School Individual Awards

Honorable Mention in Ad Design – Monica Pulliam (Dragon’s Tale)

Honorable Mention in Illustration & Infographics – Kourtney Sweet (Collegian)

Honorable Mention in Printed Photo Essay – Allie Schweizer (Dragon’s Tale)

Two-Year College Division

2nd Place in Copy Editing – Merissa Anderson (Collegian)

Two-Year Newspaper

2nd Place in Column Writing – Merissa Anderson

2nd Place in Feature Writing – Merissa Anderson

2nd Place in News Writing & Reporting – Merissa Anderson

1st Place in News Writing & Reporting – Merissa Anderson

2nd Place in Page Design – Brenna Eller

Honorable Mention in Special Sections – Collegian Staff

3rd Place in Sports Feature Writing – Lucas Barlow

1st Place in Sports Feature Writing – Lucas Barlow

Honorable Mention in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

Honorable Mention in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

2nd Place in Sports/Action Photography – Merissa Anderson

1st Place in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

The Hutchinson Collegian newspaper

Overall Silver Medalist in the two-year newspaper division

Yearbook & Magazine

Honorable Mention in Feature Photography – Taryn Gillespie

Honorable Mention in Headlines – Dustin Curiel

Honorable Mention in News & Event Writing – Megan Ryan

Honorable Mention in News/Event Photography – Allie Schweizer

3rd Place in News/Event Photography – Allie Schweizer

3rd Place in Table of Contents – Dustin Curiel

2nd Place in Table of Contents – Dustin Curiel

Honorable Mention in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

3rd Place in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

 

Dragon’s Tale magazine

Overall Gold Medalist & All-Kansas Award in the magazine division

What are the HutchCC Honors Projects? The students share their ideas

Friday, April 20th, 2018

Student: Garrett Allee’
Hometown: Viola
Major: Engineering
Honors project: Designing an auto-cap program and 3D printing for an iPhone 7 case.
Project explanation: Garret ale- I am designing an auto cap program and 3D printing for an IPhone 7 cases, in high school my engineering teacher actually decided to 3D print phone cases with the school logo and I wanted to try for myself and it just sparked it for me as well. Mine is more physical meaning I have all my past prints like physical done and I can show people them and show what went wrong and what I needed to change and I can also show pictures of my auto cap program. after I am done with Hutchinson I plan on transferring to K-state once I get there hopefully I’ll make a choice because at hutch they only have pre-engineering and as far as KSU has classes that offer that degree and so that’s what I hope to experience when I go to KSU

Student: Bianca Gutierrez
Hometown: Halstead
Major: Pre-Nursing
Honors project: Researching immunotherapy.
Project explanation: I have a partner and we are researching immunotherapy we are interviewing an oncologist and putting that in our paper so we get someone in the medical field perspective on that. Immunotherapy is the treatment of cancer cells using one’s own immune system cells and normally It’s your own body’s cell that go rouge and it’s injecting the body with a certain disease that the immune system, can recognize and you use to attack the cancer cells. immunotherapy did spark our interested because it’s not something that is being used, not widely and It’s being improved and so we are doing the research on how it works, and why it works and it can impact cancer patients in the future.

Student: Alex Ratzlaff
Hometown: Hutchinson
Major: Computer Science
Honors project: Exploring the relationship between news-media choice and your response to the news being reported on.
Project explanation: Mine is about the relationship between your choice of news media and your response to the news being reported on, for example if you were like you were responding to a post to the Washington post about the walk out, you would be more likely to be supportive for them, than you were on fox news.

Student: Bret Sauvage
Hometown: Falun
Major: Pre-Radiology
Honors project: Research on epigenetics and anxiety, and how epigenetics could be used to mediate or eliminate the effects of anxiety.
Project explanation: Brett Sauvage-  I am doing a research paper that as to be 10-15 pages on epigenetics and anxiety, and how the use of epigenetics could be able to mediate or eliminate it entire the effects of anxiety on people, or anxiety disorders for that matter.

Student: Lilly Ward
Hometown: Wichita
Major: History
Honors project: A cultural analysis over the Greek gods Poseidon and Athena.
Project explanation: “The two and how they been portrayed throughout the centuries, how each cultural there portray has been conflicted of the cultural. I love history and especially mythology and ancient history of geek. Basically anything geek or roman, it just fascinates me. And so that’s why I decided to choose mine and make it history related said Ward for mine I have to write a 15 page over it.

Student: Rachel Wright
Hometown: Little River
Major: Accounting
Honors Project: Crocheting, making a corner-to-corner throw, and benefiting the community.
Project Explanation: For the project, I had to write a research paper on crocheting and how it could be beneficial to individuals and their community. I have spent a lot of hours working on this, 50 at least. It seems like I’m finishing a lot, then I look at what I did and it doesn’t seem like much compared to all of the work I’ve put in. I don’t know what made me want to crochet when I was little, but it’s a great and kind of unique skill to have.

Astronaut Capt. Scott Kelly inspires crowd

Friday, April 20th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

On April 17, one of the largest crowds the Dillon Lecture Series has ever seen, more than 4,000 people, gathered to listen to astronaut Capt. Scott Kelly, as he inspired the crowd with his speech and reminded them that “the sky is not the limit”.

From the second Kelly stepped on stage to a standing ovation, he told the story of how he transformed himself from class-skipping college student to a beloved and historic astronaut with nearly six million current twitter followers.

“When I was a kid growing up, I was a really, really bad student,” Kelly said, speaking to the hundreds of elementary to high school students from surrounding school districts. “I wanted to do anything else besides be a student.”

Kelly told of his difficulties with ADD and ADHD throughout his primary schooling before explaining that these issues continued to plague him in his first years of college.

“I was still struggling,” Kelly said. “I couldn’t pay attention. I couldn’t study. Eventually, I’m not even going to class anymore.”

But one book from his campus bookstore transformed his life.

“One day, I’m wandering across campus and happen to go into the bookstore to buy gum or something, and I see this book on the shelf,” Kelly said. “I was interested enough that I took my gum money, purchased the book, went back to my dorm room and laid there for the next three days on my unmade dorm room bed and read the stories.”

The book was “The Right Stuff” by Tom Wolfe which told of how astronauts during earlier space travel reached their success.

“If I could just become a better student, maybe I could one day become an astronaut,” Kelly said.

And he did.

The rest of Kelly’s speech followed his adventures and mishaps that he experienced during his more than 500 days in space, while the crowd, packed shoulder-to-shoulder, listened intently on.

Although a career as an astronaut requires intense focus and drive to study, Kelly certainly kept his humor throughout his travels, and he sprinkled his speech with plenty of jokes to keep the crowd entertained and smiling.

“If we can dream it, we can do it,” Kelly said.

“If we have a plan, if we’re willing to take the the risks and make mistakes, if we focus on the things we can control and ignore what we can’t, if we test the status-quo and if we work as a team, because teamwork makes the dream work, and if we do that, then the sky is definitely not the limit.”

The Dillon Lecture Series celebrates milestone speaker

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

By Amanda Carney
Staff writer

The Dillon Lecture Series was a dream for two women, Barbara Peirce and Jeanette Mull. These two women wanted to bring a similar event that started at Kansas State University, to Hutchinson Community College.

This has become an event that has now been taking place for over 36 years at HutchCC. This event is now called The Dillon Lecture Series.

The Dillon Lecture Series started on March 29, 1982, with Richard Morefield, who had been an Iranian hostage. The public, college professors, students and staff were all invited to this event. Over 2,000 people attended the first lecture. Because, this event received great responses, they decided to keep it going.

With the hard work of the Dillon Lecture Series committee, HutchCC has been able to keep this event up and running for 36 years and been able to get some big names.

Robin Woodworth, the coordinator for the Dillon Lecture Series said, “Most big names are through speaker agencies, but some have been arranged through connections of Dillon Lecture committee members or community members.”

Arranging for guest speakers to come take a lot of preparation. The committee first must confirm the guest speaker, and arrange the contract.

“Once a speaker is confirmed and contract is signed, there are basic tasks to prepare – scheduling venue, reserving hotel for speaker, securing helpers for lecture and sending out tickets to patrons,” Woodworth said.

There are many hopes for the Dillon Lecture Series in the future. The series tries to get guest speakers that will connect with all age groups. The series also hopes to continue to find guest speakers that delay a message that everyone can relate with.

“We hope to continue to bring interesting and engaging speakers, they may not always have a name you recognize, but maybe the you will recognize their story from their life experiences,” Woodworth said.