Posts Tagged ‘Dillon Lecture Series’

Holthus lecture was a touchdown

Friday, February 9th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

Mitch Holthus, the man who paints a picture with his words as “The Voice of the Kansas City Chiefs”, spoke at the first Dillon Lecture Series of the Hutchinson Community College 2018 spring semester on Tuesday at the Sports Arena.

In his speech, “Success in Being Different”, he used several examples of being different in a giving manner.

Mitch Holthus is a Smith Center native and still gives on-air and Twitter shoutouts every now and then to the Redmen. He and his wife, Tami, who is from McPherson, both graduated from Kansas State. She played basketball and later became the assistant coach for their daughter’s basketball team at Silver Lake, which won a state championship in the Sports Arena.

Along with announcing Chiefs and ESPN games, Mitch Holthus also does some things to help others. When Joplin, Missouri was devastated by a tornado, he helped provide water for the community. He also helps people within his job.

A blind man, Cameron Black, one of many affected by Mitch Holthus and his ability to speak a portrait, learned to love football because of Holthus. As shown in a video from The Kansas City Star, Holthus has made a huge impact in the man’s life because Black’s daughter, who has the same disease, also listens to the Chiefs’ games.

After seeing the video for the first time, Holthus said, “It stopped me in my tracks. If I mean everything to Cameron, if I can paint a picture verbally to someone who can’t see, I am helping someone by being different.”

Holthus also mentioned and introduced three HutchCC students in the crowd – Tyler Pauley from Garden Plain, Jeff Brandon from Hutchinson, and Ashton Hawkins from Smith Center, who all have done extraordinary things at this college, and work hard in and outside of school.

At the press conference before the event, Holthus answered questions regarding his career as a well-known sports announcer. One question that was asked pertained to a possible downfall in NFL fans in the last few years. He answered that it was a good question and that it “seems” to be a decline to some, but said that people don’t see everything with the NFL, only what is covered by reporters.

He pointed out the national anthem protests becoming a popular look on the league, but also explained that people don’t see the “behind-the scenes” action of players. Some, like Alex Smith, do remarkable things outside of the Chiefs. Smith helps foster kids earn college scholarships and donates to their organization.

Because he witnesses generous acts with the Chiefs and throughout Kansas, Mitch Holthus has a soft spot for the people and the state itself.

“I love this state, I made three career moves, yet still remained here in Kansas,” Holthus said.

He said how honored he was to speak at the Sports Arena and to share his experiences. Being from Smith Center has taught him how to be the man he is today and he seeks to find others who are different with success.

“To take the game beyond the game, it then becomes a celebration for anyone,” Holthus said.

One question that stood out to him was asked by a high school student from Inman. She asked about his love for announcing and how he became who he is today.

“Who you are and how you were raised makes you original,” Holthus said. “We all come from different home lives, but work ethic is a huge part of making an impression too.”

He stated several times that to be a good journalist, work ethic is important, but being a journalist also comes with great sacrifices. He has had to manage a family alongside his career, and although he loves what he does, Holthus expressed regrets for the moments he has missed, such as his daughter Hayley’s championship game. Brian, his son, had always dreamed of running on the Sports Arena court like his sister had. That never happened because his team never got to state.

During the lecture, Holthus presented a slideshow of the steps of differences that lead to success. Throughout his speech, he used a metaphor of floodwaters, such as the Arkansas River, or Gulf of Mexico flooding lives and trying to slow people down from reaching their ultimate goals. He explained “Empathetic Equity” – Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.

The example he used for this was one of his favorite Chiefs, Derrick Johnson, who has funded about 15 reading dens in Kansas City and does things without expecting a reward, only from the kindness of his heart. In the summer last year, Johnson spent a lot of time practicing football with a younger player who hadn’t even made it through tryouts. Holthus noticed this and thought it was generous and showed him the kind of man Johnson is aside from football.

There were many more examples and topics. One of the last differences, “Being Different by Standing Firm”, was to show that people have to work for their success and shouldn’t run from their responsibilities.

“My job is to stand the post when it’s good or bad,” Holthus said. “Many times it isn’t easy, but you still stand the post like a marine in front of the embassy.”

Finishing with the last difference where Holthus discovered his relative, who was a poor European man that moved to Nebraska and joined the Union in the Civil War. He stood shoulder to shoulder with the black men in the blue uniforms. It was a major step in the American culture, and Holthus said he was proud to be related to the man that didn’t look down upon the African American men fighting by his side.

This thought led to his final statement that we will all leave marks on the world, but “what footprints will we leave?”

 

Olympian, Shawn Johnson, visits Hutch for Dillon Lecture Series

Friday, November 10th, 2017

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

From Scooby-Doo shorts and baggy t-shirts to a US leotard, Shawn Johnson East overcame her shyness and bullies at the age of 12 when she was handpicked to go to a 2004 international gymnastics event in Belgium. In 2008, at 16-years old she made her way to the Beijing Olympics. She was an Olympic gold medalist, “Dancing With the Stars” winner, and is now a YouTube sensation.

On Tuesday, Johnson was the speaker at the Dillon Lecture Series located in the Hutchinson Sports Arena.

Johnson has had several accomplishments in her life, the most well-known accomplishment being the 2008 summer Olympics in Beijing. She won the silver in the all-around competition and earned a gold medal for the balance beam.

Growing up, Johnson had a fairly normal childhood. She is from Des Moines, Iowa and like many kids, she just wanted to fit in. At the beginning of her speech, Johnson gave examples of bullies and challenges she faced growing up, including – girls not wanting her to join the “cool” group, wearing her favorite Scooby-Doo shorts and T-shirt, and having the first name “Shawn”.

Before her lecture, Johnson was asked about speaking in the Midwest rather than in a big city/state. She said, “I feel so much more relaxed and at home here, I love to speak in the Midwest.”

Another question asked was, “What advice would you like to leave high school and college students today?” She said, “This society makes it hard to have a passion in something without people assuming you will stick with that your whole life.”

She also explained how one might love to play the violin, but that doesn’t mean they have to become a musician.

She was also asked about President Trump, since she was on “Celebrity Apprentice”, her response was, “Aside from the politics, the man and family I met were very nice.”

In her speech, Johnson told about her experience at Beijing when she was representing the United States as the captain of her team for the first time as a 16-year old. She was signed by eight different companies for endorsements. She felt like everyone was expecting her to bring home gold medals. She ended up getting second in the All-Around and first 1st place in beam.

Nastia Liukin, who was also representing the US, and close friend of Shawn’s beat her in the All-Around.
“My heart absolutely shattered,” Johnson said.

She devoted her entire life to this moment and she didn’t get her gold medal. She got silver, and when approached by reporters, she assumed they would give congratulations, but instead was asked, “How does it feel to lose?”

At that point, Johnson had already felt angry so she snapped back with, “I didn’t lose, I won a silver medal for my country.”

When she won the gold for the beam, she thought she didn’t do her best.

“I didn’t deserve it,” she said.

She felt like the all-around was much better because she wanted it more. Her coach agreed with her and said, “Better next time.”

Another accomplishment Johnson is known for is winning the eighth season of “Dancing With the Stars” as a 17-year old in 2009. She shared that she wasn’t comfortable with the outfits at first and dancing with someone she didn’t know. Eventually she overcame her fears and ended up winning the competition.

Recently, Johnson was introduced to charity work. There is an organization called Hope Sports that provides athletes who have retired or quit an opportunity to help the less fortunate. Shawn went with a group of athletes to Tijuana, Mexico. They have built over 4,000 houses for people in need. She found the experience very rewarding and even met her husband through that organization. She also coaches, mentors, and raises money for other charities.

Her speech ended with some advice to high school and college students. She said, “Society puts so much pressure on us anymore.” She led into a rant about how people expect too much of young kids nowadays and how kids should just do what they love and not worry about making a career of it. They can love to draw, but that doesn’t mean they have to become an artist. Johnson also left students with the idea that sharing her life on social media is like “living in a fishbowl.” She also said to be smart on social media, because anyone can see what you post.

Johnson’s latest adventure has been documenting her life on YouTube. Recently she has shared her experience of finding out she was pregnant and her reactions to the doctor breaking the news that she was miscarrying. Although, saddening to Johnson and her husband, she wanted mothers in her position to know she understood and that they aren’t alone.

Next Dillon Lecture Series speaker is an Olympic gold medalist

Friday, November 3rd, 2017

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

On Tuesday, Olympic gold medalist, Shawn Johnson East will be speaking on behalf of the Dillon Lecture Series at the Hutchinson Sports Arena.

According to the Administrative Assistant to the President and Dillon Lecture Series Coordinator, Robin Woodworth, the lecture begins at 10:30 a.m. and the doors will open at 9:45. HutchCC students are admitted for free with a student I.D.

Shawn Johnson, 25, is a four-time Olympic medalist and was the “Dancing with the Stars” winner in 2009.

She has gone through many hurdles in her life and hasn’t always gotten what she wanted. In Beijing, she lost the dream she had worked for several years, finishing second place in the all-around Olympics. On the other hand, she did win the individual gold medal for the balance beam.

Later on, Shawn went through a painful knee injury due to a skiing accident and had to rethink her life and choices.

Keppler Speakers, a privately held speakers bureau, stated that she ended up retiring from gymnastics, and in 2012 published a book “Winning Balance”. In 2014, Shawn appeared on the hit show Celebrity Apprentice.

She is majorly involved in cancer and animal charities.

Keppler also said, “Celebrity speaker Shawn Johnson truly loves big and lives big.”

The lecture is expected to be mainly about faith and motivation, and Shawn Johnson has so many experiences to share.

Dillon speaker: Soap is good

Wednesday, October 14th, 2015

By Angela Ling

Kayongo

Kayongo

The U.S. throws away 800 million bars of soap every year.
“That’s 2.6 million bars every day,” said Derrek Kayongo, in his Oct. 6 Dillion Lecture.
Kayongo, now a U.S. citizen, is originally from Uganda and is a survivor of a civil war and refugee camps.
He grew up in a modern and very successful African family, but civil war wrecked his parents’ success and drove them to Kenya, seeking refuge from the dangers in Uganda.
Kayongo saw first-hand, many men, women, and children die of infections and diseases that could have been prevented if they only had soap to wash their hands with.  He saw the need for soap in the poor African villages, but it wasn’t until many years later that he could help.
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Dillon Lecture

Sunday, September 27th, 2015


Derreck
Kayongo

Title: Founder of Global Soap Project

Lecture date: 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 6

Where: Hutchinson Sports Arena

Derrick Kayongo, founder of the Global Soap Project, will be speaking as a part of the Dillon Lecture Series on Tuesday, Oct. 6, at the Sports Arena.

The Global Soap project is a non-profit organization whose goal is to provide soap to people who don’t have access to it.
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Dillon speaker recalls his quest in Europe to research art saviors

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

By Lariena Nokes

Edsel

Edsel

In his Feb. 1 Dillon Lecture, Robert Edsel presented an informative speech about rescuing, preserving and returning the great art of the world to its rightful owners.

Edsel told story of the original “monuments men” of World War II, then followed up with information about soldiers currently serving as monuments officers in the American military.

“Is art worth dying for?” Edsel asked.

This thought-provoking question was the focal point of the author’s presentation.

When the timeless value of art is compared to human lives during a war, some chose to risk their lives to save the art.
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