Campus couples share love stories

February 9th, 2018

Laurelle Augustine and Matt LaMunyon

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

Matt LaMunyon and Laurelle Augustine are both students at Hutchinson Community College Laurelle is a sophomore, while Matt is a freshman. Laurelle is a Blue Dragon cheerleader, while Matt dabbles in Student Government.

Both are Hutchinson natives and attended Hutchinson High School.

Q: When and where did you meet?

A: In Spanish class at their high school Laurelle’s sophomore year and Matt’s freshmen year. At first they were best friends, but later grew into a relationship.

Q: How long have you been dating?

A: Four years this March

Q: What is your favorite place to go together?

A: Their first date was at Chili’s, so they like to think of it as “their place”.

Q: Is there a certain thing you do every year for Valentine’s Day?

A: They go out to eat at Applebee’s or they just spend time with each other. “We don’t really do anything big,” LaMunyon said.

Q: What is your favorite thing about each other?

A: Laurelle’s favorite thing about Matt is his humor. “He’s a funny dude,” she said. Matt answered, “Her laugh is my favorite.”

Q: What is the secret to being in a relationship for a long time?

A: They agreed that the key is to just have fun all the time and be with someone you enjoy hanging out with. They were best friends before they became a couple and Laurelle said, “Make sure the other person has a good personality.”

Rayne Penny and Jamison Stout

By Amanda Carney
Staff writer

For most people, high school is place to grow, meet new people and join new clubs. For Rayne Penny and Jamison Stout, they found each other. Rayne and Jamison have been dating for almost four years.

The couple dated all through high school and into their first year of college. Although marriage is not out of the question, Rayne and Jamison fell no need to rush into anything. Rayne said, “We want to get through our first couple of years of college.”

Here’s more about these two Hutchinson Community College students, both of whom hail from McPherson.

AC: How did you guys meet?

RP: We meet through our advisory class freshman year in high school. Jamison asked for my Snapchat and we started talking.

AC: Are there any secrets on making a relationship last?

RP/JS: You always have to be willing to compromise with each other, it’s not always about what you want. You also have to trust the other person and you have to be able to stick together through the hard times.

AC: What does he do that drives Rayne crazy?

RP: He forgets to tell me things, so I remind to write stuff down or just text me.

AC: What does she do that drive Jamison crazy?

JS: She talks quiet and is soft spoken so I say WHAT I CAN’T HEAR YOU.

AC: What do you guys like to do together?

RP/JS: We like play with our dog, Ava, who is a Miniature American Eskimo. We also like to go on road trips and try new restaurants together!

AC: How long have you guys been dating?

RP/JS: We started dating our freshman year of high school on valentine’s day, so about four years.

AC: Do you do anything special for valentine’s day?

RP/JS: Since Valentine’s Day is the day we started dating we try and do something special. We like to spend the day together or we try and do a weekend trip.

Duane and Carolyn Schmidt

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

For most people, high school is place to grow, meet new people and join new clubs. For Rayne Penny and Jamison Stout, they found each other. Rayne and Jamison have been dating for almost four years.

The couple dated all through high school and into their first year of college. Although marriage is not out of the question, Rayne and Jamison fell no need to rush into anything. Rayne said, “We want to get through our first couple of years of college.”

Here’s more about these two Hutchinson Community College students, both of whom hail from McPherson.

AC: How did you guys meet?

RP: We meet through our advisory class freshman year in high school. Jamison asked for my Snapchat and we started talking.

AC: Are there any secrets on making a relationship last?

RP/JS: You always have to be willing to compromise with each other, it’s not always about what you want. You also have to trust the other person and you have to be able to stick together through the hard times.

AC: What does he do that drives Rayne crazy?

RP: He forgets to tell me things, so I remind to write stuff down or just text me.

AC: What does she do that drive Jamison crazy?

JS: She talks quiet and is soft spoken so I say WHAT I CAN’T HEAR YOU.

AC: What do you guys like to do together?

RP/JS: We like play with our dog, Ava, who is a Miniature American Eskimo. We also like to go on road trips and try new restaurants together!

AC: How long have you guys been dating?

RP/JS: We started dating our freshman year of high school on valentine’s day, so about four years.

AC: Do you do anything special for valentine’s day?

RP/JS: Since Valentine’s Day is the day we started dating we try and do something special. We like to spend the day together or we try and do a weekend trip.

Holthus lecture was a touchdown

February 9th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

Mitch Holthus, the man who paints a picture with his words as “The Voice of the Kansas City Chiefs”, spoke at the first Dillon Lecture Series of the Hutchinson Community College 2018 spring semester on Tuesday at the Sports Arena.

In his speech, “Success in Being Different”, he used several examples of being different in a giving manner.

Mitch Holthus is a Smith Center native and still gives on-air and Twitter shoutouts every now and then to the Redmen. He and his wife, Tami, who is from McPherson, both graduated from Kansas State. She played basketball and later became the assistant coach for their daughter’s basketball team at Silver Lake, which won a state championship in the Sports Arena.

Along with announcing Chiefs and ESPN games, Mitch Holthus also does some things to help others. When Joplin, Missouri was devastated by a tornado, he helped provide water for the community. He also helps people within his job.

A blind man, Cameron Black, one of many affected by Mitch Holthus and his ability to speak a portrait, learned to love football because of Holthus. As shown in a video from The Kansas City Star, Holthus has made a huge impact in the man’s life because Black’s daughter, who has the same disease, also listens to the Chiefs’ games.

After seeing the video for the first time, Holthus said, “It stopped me in my tracks. If I mean everything to Cameron, if I can paint a picture verbally to someone who can’t see, I am helping someone by being different.”

Holthus also mentioned and introduced three HutchCC students in the crowd – Tyler Pauley from Garden Plain, Jeff Brandon from Hutchinson, and Ashton Hawkins from Smith Center, who all have done extraordinary things at this college, and work hard in and outside of school.

At the press conference before the event, Holthus answered questions regarding his career as a well-known sports announcer. One question that was asked pertained to a possible downfall in NFL fans in the last few years. He answered that it was a good question and that it “seems” to be a decline to some, but said that people don’t see everything with the NFL, only what is covered by reporters.

He pointed out the national anthem protests becoming a popular look on the league, but also explained that people don’t see the “behind-the scenes” action of players. Some, like Alex Smith, do remarkable things outside of the Chiefs. Smith helps foster kids earn college scholarships and donates to their organization.

Because he witnesses generous acts with the Chiefs and throughout Kansas, Mitch Holthus has a soft spot for the people and the state itself.

“I love this state, I made three career moves, yet still remained here in Kansas,” Holthus said.

He said how honored he was to speak at the Sports Arena and to share his experiences. Being from Smith Center has taught him how to be the man he is today and he seeks to find others who are different with success.

“To take the game beyond the game, it then becomes a celebration for anyone,” Holthus said.

One question that stood out to him was asked by a high school student from Inman. She asked about his love for announcing and how he became who he is today.

“Who you are and how you were raised makes you original,” Holthus said. “We all come from different home lives, but work ethic is a huge part of making an impression too.”

He stated several times that to be a good journalist, work ethic is important, but being a journalist also comes with great sacrifices. He has had to manage a family alongside his career, and although he loves what he does, Holthus expressed regrets for the moments he has missed, such as his daughter Hayley’s championship game. Brian, his son, had always dreamed of running on the Sports Arena court like his sister had. That never happened because his team never got to state.

During the lecture, Holthus presented a slideshow of the steps of differences that lead to success. Throughout his speech, he used a metaphor of floodwaters, such as the Arkansas River, or Gulf of Mexico flooding lives and trying to slow people down from reaching their ultimate goals. He explained “Empathetic Equity” – Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.

The example he used for this was one of his favorite Chiefs, Derrick Johnson, who has funded about 15 reading dens in Kansas City and does things without expecting a reward, only from the kindness of his heart. In the summer last year, Johnson spent a lot of time practicing football with a younger player who hadn’t even made it through tryouts. Holthus noticed this and thought it was generous and showed him the kind of man Johnson is aside from football.

There were many more examples and topics. One of the last differences, “Being Different by Standing Firm”, was to show that people have to work for their success and shouldn’t run from their responsibilities.

“My job is to stand the post when it’s good or bad,” Holthus said. “Many times it isn’t easy, but you still stand the post like a marine in front of the embassy.”

Finishing with the last difference where Holthus discovered his relative, who was a poor European man that moved to Nebraska and joined the Union in the Civil War. He stood shoulder to shoulder with the black men in the blue uniforms. It was a major step in the American culture, and Holthus said he was proud to be related to the man that didn’t look down upon the African American men fighting by his side.

This thought led to his final statement that we will all leave marks on the world, but “what footprints will we leave?”

 

Drama around the clock

February 9th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Staff writer

The 24-Hour Play festival is Saturday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. and is located in the BJ Warner Recital Hall in Stringer Fine Arts Center.

When it comes to the 24-Hour Play Festival, there are four skits that the students work to write, audition for, rehearse and then, finally, perform.

“Memorizing your lines can be hard because some are short and some are long,” Isaac Glover, a Hutchinson Community College student majoring in the drama said.

“Keep moving forward,” Glover said. “Don’t give up, life moves on.”

For those involved with theater and acting, drama can be both rewarding and stressful according to another drama major, Jocelyn Reed.

“There are going to be bad days and performances,” Reed said.

When Reed on the stage, she believes that the audience hardly notices her or isn’t paying attention.

“Freshmen year is good time to express yourself,” Reed said. “It gives you an open window to experience new things.”

Reed and Glover are both involved with the 24-Hour Play Festival and will be performing along with their peers on Saturday.

“It’s a lot of fun,” Reed said. “The more you fail, the more you learn. It’s more about diving into the character to get the full aspect of what you love doing the most.”

Everyone shows up at 8:30 Friday evening and does a brief introduction and audition if you’re an actor. Actors then can present any special skills they have that may be incorporated into the show.

Following this, everyone leaves except the playwrights. The playwrights write through the night and have a script done before the actors get there at 7. Then the actors and directors and technicians have until 730 that night to prepare everything needed to bring the shows to life. Curtain goes up at 730 and we see 6 new plays.

This year we have 42 people participating in various capacities

In order for any show to happen, there needs to be lighting and sound technicians, and everything has to be as spot on as possible. Reed and Glover both have experience as technicians and both said they loved it even though understanding when to cue the lights and sound at the right time is a challenge.

Deidre Ensz-Mattox, Director of Theatre at HutchCC, fell in love with theater in high school, where she acted and participated in plays.

She attended HutchCC many years ago, where she had her first college theater experience. Ensz-Mattox said she loves her work. She said she wouldn’t want to do anything else. Ensz-

She teaches all of the performance-based courses and is the faculty sponsor for the college’s chapter of Delta Psi Omega, the National Collegiate Theater Organization.

Photos: Salt City Bowl

December 7th, 2017

Photos by Merissa Anderson

Juwaun Johnson dives into the end zone and scores a touchdown during the Salt City Bowl on Dec. 1 at Gowans Stadium.

Juwaun Johnson dives into the end zone and scores a touchdown during the Salt City Bowl on Dec. 1 at Gowans Stadium.

‘Tis the season to be … hateful?

December 1st, 2017

As sang by MAGIC!: Why you gotta be so rude?

There has been too much arguing going on and not enough happiness and cheer being spread around this season.

Thanksgiving seems to have gone by so fast and yet did anyone really stop to think about what they are thankful for? Or did they just eat a gigantic meal and take a nap afterwards?

With all of the terrible events happening recently, the world could use some laugher and kindness.

What ever happened to being hospitable and welcoming to people?

It seems that society is too wrapped up in social media and certain standards of “normal” that they treat people like they are the better person.

There are too many hypocrites in this world and with a bit of warm Christmas spirit, you can improve someone’s day. Just a friendly smile can make someone’s day or asking how they are doing could impact their mood.

So what is with all of the judging going on? Tabloids and TV shows make gossip too hard to resist, and we try to fit into “Hollywood” expectations, which are almost impossible to accomplish.

Why must we compare ourselves with everyone around us? There is no reason to point out flaws in you or someone else just by a one-second glance.

Think about people judging you based on your appearance. You probably wouldn’t like that very much either. “Killing people with kindness” is a great rule of thumb that everyone should use.

Be happy this Christmas and help others be happy too, and don’t judge people just because you think you know what’s going on in their lives. Take the time to get to know someone before you write them off.

Come on people, it’s the time to be jolly! It isn’t the time for a bunch of Scrooges to be ruining the cheery time of year for others.

The unfortunate events of Brenna: My Christmas experience

December 1st, 2017

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

Every year, my family would take a trip to see my grandparents in Atwood.

It’s a good four-hour drive from Little River. We don’t go very often anymore because our grandparents moved to Little River, but Atwood is still one of my favorite places to visit.

One Christmas, I believe I was about 7-years old, I went to a friend’s birthday party after our YMCA basketball game. I ended up staying the night there and the next morning my family was planning on going to Atwood.

My dad stayed home this time, so my mom came and picked me up with my three sisters. On the way, my younger sister and I had our usual fights about not having enough room in our family’s mini-van and about staying on our own sides of the seats.

Four agonizing hours later, we finally spotted the tell-tale plants and hills of Atwood, we all got excited.
The whole way, I had been trying not to itch my head because it had been bothering me that entire time. I told my mom, but she didn’t think there was anything to worry about.

When we got to our grandparents’ house we noticed that their lights were all off and their car was gone. My mom decided to call them and we found out that they were actually in Texas seeing some family members.
So we saw some other family in Atwood, since my family is originally from there. My mom has a lot of friends there too so we still had plenty to do even though our grandparents were gone.

So, what is the unfortunate event you ask? WelI, I was sitting at the dining room table itching my head again, what seemed like the millionth time. This time it was a horrible feeling like something was crawling around on my head. I put my fingers to my scalp and at the same place I was going to scratch, I touched a little bug. I pulled it out and looked at it in disbelief.

My mom came in after hearing me scream. She asked, “What’s wrong?” And I just told her to look on my head. She did and she started yelling too.

After combing through my hair and putting any kind of solution she could find in it to drown the disgusting creatures, we finally killed all of the lice.

We disinfected the entire house, washed any blankets, sheets, and stuffed animals we could find, and then went on with the rest of our trip paranoid.

On the bright side, I haven’t had lice since then. Hopefully I will never have to go through that again.

A new beginning for The Collegian

December 1st, 2017

By Brad Hallier
Collegian Advisor

I’ve never been an educator before this semester started. All I’ve ever known in the professional world was being a sports journalist.

When my time as a newspaper guy ended on May 31st of this year, my future was as uncertain as a typical college student’s. Fortunately, some outstanding people at Hutchinson Community College recommended that I become the new journalism instructor and adviser to The Hutchinson Collegian.

I love journalism. After my family and soccer, journalism is my true love. Having the opportunity to teach college students journalism was intriguing and exciting. Really, all I wanted to do this semester was pass on my love of journalism.

I don’t know whether I succeeded in that or not. But here’s what I do know – the seven students who were on staff this semester worked their baguettes off to make The Collegian the source to read news about HutchCC.

While I have never been an educator before, I didn’t come into this semester naïve. I’m well aware of what had happened with The Collegian the last few years and that there were some bridges burned. But I wasn’t concerned with any of that. One of the first days of class, I let my students know what our goal was for this semester – to have people read our product.

I wanted to see students looking at our newspaper. I wanted to see faculty and staff reading it. I wanted an increased web presence and improved social media. I wanted to see people sharing stories on Facebook and retweeting stories on Twitter.

Again, I don’t know how well we succeeded at that, but the results were encouraging. Several times this semester, the student-publications box in Lockman Hall was empty. Small newspaper stacks in Shears Technology Center, Lockman, Parker Student Union and the Sports Arena were often gone, or, at least, had been shifted around.

The students have done some outstanding work. From the Halloween edition to problems with Student Health Services to the best sports features on Blue Dragon athletes seen in this publication maybe ever, I can’t say enough about how well Merissa Anderson, Emma Cox, “Unfortunate” Brenna Eller, Amanda Carney, Lucas Barlow, Jack Greenwood and Cassidy Crites have done this semester.

I’ve never been in journalism for myself. Compliments, while appreciated, often embarrass me. And rest assured, I’ve heard a ton of compliments this semester, often geared toward me.

I appreciate it. I really do. But The Collegian is not about me. I never want to see my name in this publication again. This publication is by the students, and for the students and entire HutchCC community.

We’re living in interesting times, especially when it comes to journalism. When practiced properly and ethically, it’s one of the most rewarding and noble professions in the world. My hope is to guide students who take my class, and help them practice journalism the right way.

To the students of HutchCC, keep reading the newspaper. Take a journalism class (we have tacos and pizza!). And to the faculty and staff, thank you for welcoming me to your world. I hope you’re as happy with The Collegian as I have been. And please, if you have one of my students in class and you’ve liked what you’ve read and seen, pay them a compliment. They’re the ones who deserve it.

Time for Blue Dragons to go bowling

December 1st, 2017

By Lucas Barlow
Sports Editor

After four months of football, Hutchinson Community College’s season will end on Saturday, and it’s been a wild one.

As Hutchinson is bowl eligible, the Blue Dragons will get to play one final game of the season. Before Thanksgiving, it was announced that the Blue Dragons will face Eastern Arizona in the Salt City Bowl. This will be coach Rion Rhoades’ seventh Salt City Bowl, and the opponent is a familiar one as they played Eastern Arizona back in 2010.

Rhoades believes it’s going to be a challenging matchup.

“Their offense is hard to get prepared for because it’s so unorthodox, you don’t see it much these days,” he said. “It’s hard to simulate in practice. And on defense, well, everything they’re good at, we struggle with.”

The Gila Monsters run a flexbone offense, a formation that is rare in college football.

Although the Blue Dragons are up against a good team, Rhoades still has a high amount of confidence in his squad

“After Thanksgiving, everyone showed up very engaged in practice. I think they know that we’re facing a good football team. Their hungry and we got something to prove here.”

The Blue Dragons will play the Gila Monsters on home turf. Game time is at 1 p.m. and will be hosted at Gowans Stadium.

In a season where records were broken, comebacks were made and 90 men came together, it’s safe to say this season has been one for the books.

The season started off with a rollercoaster of emotions, as the Blue Dragons came back from 25-point deficit to rallying off one of the most exciting games of the season, winning 50-42 against Coffeyville Community College. This comeback was also the largest in Hutchinson’s 86-year history.

The following week, Hutchinson travel to Iowa to face No. 12 Iowa Western. This matchup was highly anticipated and it proved to be an exciting one. However, the Blue Dragons couldn’t top the Reivers falling 27-21, their first loss of the season.

The Blue Dragons then went on to win their next five games, highlighted a by 91-0 thrashing of Rezolution Prep. During this game, as many as seven team records were broken including, most points in a single game, largest margin of victory and most touchdowns scored. Hutchinson reached its peak national ranking during this time at No. 9. The Blue Dragons also became bowl eligible after their sixth win of the season.

Hard times hit the Blue Dragons the following week. On a cold, wet, homecoming night, their winning streak ended by No. 16 Butler Community College, 38-10.

Next, Hutchinson couldn’t find its footing against Independence Community College as the Blue Dragons fell 24-19. The Blue Dragons made it three straight losses with an upset loss to Fort Scott Community College in the final home game of the regular season.

In the regular-season finale, the Blue Dragons came together to play a solid game against Dodge City Community College. After two special team touchdowns, Hutchinson won 27-6.

Basketball teams have been road warriors so far in conference play

December 1st, 2017

By Cassidy Crites
Staff writer

For the first month of basketball season, the Hutchinson Community College teams have had anything but a home-court advantage. Out of the Blue Dragons’ first eight conference games, six have been away.

In November, the Sports Arena hosted two different volleyball tournaments. First was the KCAC volleyball tournament. The arena also had the opportunity to host the NJCAA National Volleyball tournament. These events took place over two different weekends, resulting in road games for the basketball squads.

However, there are positives to having so many road games at the beginning of the season. The Blue Dragon teams play four straight home games in the middle of January.

Women’s coach John Ontjes wasn’t fond of playing so many road games but has found the positives in the situation.

“There has been a disadvantage with how many new kids we have on our team not playing at home, but picking up a few road wins now will help when we return the home games in January,” Ontjes said.

Despite all the traveling, both men and women’s Blue Dragon teams are off to a good start. The women post a 6-2 overall record and 4-2 in the conference after Wednesday’s win against Colby. Their two losses have come from Seward County Community College and Cloud County Community College, both on their opponent’s court.

The men are 9-1 overall and 5-1 in the conference. Their one loss came from Cloud County, also at the Thunderdome.

While some athletes feel the effect of not playing on their court, Ontjes does not feel as though it has altered the way the girls play.

“It would’ve been nice to start the conference with two home games, but I don’t think it’s made that big of an impact on the way we played. The kids we have didn’t know the difference,” Ontjes said.

Up next the Blue Dragons hit the road again to face Garden City on Saturday. Hutch rounds out the eight-game start Dec. 6 at Butler.

HutchCC theatre students headed to Iowa for competition

December 1st, 2017

By Jack Greenwood
Staff writer

Winter break is coming up, which means most students will use that time to detox from the stresses of the semester and spend time with family. However, a handful of students from Hutchinson Community College’s theatre department will be finding scripts, rehearsing scenes, preparing portfolios and presentations and perfecting performance pieces.

In January, four students will be competing for the prestigious Irene Ryan Scholarship at the region give American College Theatre Festival. The festival is an opportunity for theatre majors to be submerged in their craft and work on improving through workshops and competitions.

To compete for the scholarship, the productions that HutchCC put on had to be entered and judged. A judge would then choose two of the actors to compete, whom he felt exceeded performance quality. For their performances in the September’s “Gruesome Playground Injuries,” students Jack Greenwood, Valley Center, and Gabby Hernandez, Hutchinson, will compete. They are joined by nominees from the November production of “The Importance of Being Earnest” Jocelyn Reed, Hutchinson, and Isaac Glover, Hutchinson.

In addition to acting, students also can also explore stage makeup, costumes, playwriting, directing, stage managing, set design, dance, lighting and sound design.

Greenwood will be competing in the acting competition but has also written a 10-minute play that has been submitted for consideration for scholarship, and will possibly receive a staged concert reading.

Reed will be competing in acting and stage managing.

“It’s an honor to be representing a college that really values the success of its students and understands the importance of live theatre,” Reed said. “Theatre can expose people to different walks of life and social issues. It teaches us how to be empathetic to the plights of those different from us.”

Each acting nominee will take a partner to act with them in the competition. Partners include Dylan Kramer, McPherson, who will be Greenwood’s partner, Hannah Gomez, Hutchinson, who will be Glover’s partner, Lauren Couchman, Newton, who will be Reed’s partner and Alex Acosta, Hutchinson, who will be Hernandez’s partner.

“It’s an exciting to have this opportunity, I’m thankful,” Acosta said.

“I’m excited to get to do the workshops and to make connections,” Couchman said. “I’m also really excited to compete with Jocelyn in the Irene Ryan competition, it will be interesting to see how far we get.”

The festival also an opportunity to make professional and school connections. HutchCC students fall into region five, which consists of Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa. Most four-year colleges will be represented at the festival and have recruitment opportunities for students.
The festival also attracts theatre professionals from across the country, including Broadway. This year, famed playwright Neil Labute will be a part of the festival.

Some schools also enter their shows to be transferred to festival and will be performed again in Des Moines.

“Last year, the festival gave me the opportunity to bond with the people who are now my best friends, so I’m excited to see how the new students enjoy it,” Hernandez said. “It also helped me realize that I want to be involved in theatre for the rest of my life.”