Archive for the ‘Features’ Category

HutchCC student inspires many: After battling addiction since grade school, Jeff Brandon is loving father, successful student and shining example of how perseverance can change one’s life for the better

Friday, February 16th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

At a small family farm just north of Hutchinson, a man – who as praised by the voice of the Kansas City Chiefs Mitch Holthus, “serves as an inspiration to everyone around him.” – lives with his young daughter

Jeff Brandon is a 43 year-old, first-year college student at Hutchinson Community College. He is single-handedly raising his 8-year-old daughter, KeilyJo.

“Life is good,” Brandon said. “I feel proud of myself.”

However, Brandon’s life hadn’t always been as picturesque as he finds it to be now. For more than 25 years, Brandon battled an addiction than began as a child.

“I’ve been through tons of crazy stuff,” Brandon said. “I don’t have a lot of memories of my childhood, but when I was young in grade school, I do remember that I was different. At an early age, I started drinking, and I, for the first time, I had friends that I never had all my life. For the first few years, it was good, but at some point it took control, and you never know when that point is going to be.”

Eventually, his alcohol addiction turned into a drug habit at the age of 19, and Brandon dropped out of high school.

“At that point, it was all over,” Brandon said.

Despite the darkness that Brandon faced during this period of his life, he made a decision after his daughter’s birth that would forever change his life, and the lives of those around him.

“I got sober when I was 36,” Brandon said. “Five months after my daughter was born – Sept. 26, 2010 is my clean day.”

Recovery is often a long, complicated road full of relapses for many recovering addicts, but for Brandon, his daughter made it the easiest thing in the world.

“I spent five months using after she was born, but then her mom left and took her away, and that was the most devastating pain I ever felt in my life,” Brandon said. “I haven’t struggled with staying clean. I lost all desire to use the day I stopped.”

Soon after, Brandon gained custody of his daughter, and his life has been a restoration process ever since.

“Looking back on all the years I lost, it just isn’t worth it,” Brandon said. “I have more fun now sober than I ever did, because when you’re under the influence, you’re consumed. You make irrational decisions, you don’t think straight and it’s just utter chaos and it gets to a point where you enjoy the chaos.”

After making the decision to earn his GED last winter, Brandon made the decision to major in psychology at HutchCC.

“I decided to change my life,” Brandon said. “I’ve been totally overwhelmed with the support from faculty and students. It’s been a great experience, and when I was applying for scholarships, I was getting letters from people and the words I received from others just made me bawl.”

Brandon has made many good relationships with peers and supervisors since he began at HutchCC last semester.

“I’m amazed with everything the school offers,” Brandon said. “You’re set up to succeed here, and if you apply yourself, there’s no reason to fail. I’m 43, a single parent, I work two jobs, and I still maintain decent grades.”

Brandon looks forward to attending HutchCC next year, and perhaps moving on to Wichita State after graduation. Most importantly though, Brandon wants to a good influence for his daughter.

“Despite everything (KeilyJo) has been through, she’s happy and I just try to be a positive role model in everything I do,” Brandon said. “I want her to be proud and I want her to see that anything is possible.”

After hearing from others that he inspires them, and after being used as an example of progress during Holthus’ speech, Brandon is beginning to realize the influence he can have on others.

“I’m just another person here in my mind,” Brandon said. “I’m no different and no better than anybody else, but to hear that I’m more than just a student makes me feel proud and gives me that sense of accomplishment.

“If I can go through life touching on person and changing one person’s life, it’ll have been worth it.

No matter what, don’t give up. Life isn’t always easy but like an old-timer once told me, you have to make the best of what you got and keep pushing forward and never give up.”

New season, new role for Blue Dragon sophomore

Friday, February 16th, 2018

By Lucas Barlow
Sports Editor

As the postseason nears for the Hutchinson Community College men’s basketball team, veteran players will have to step up as leaders to help get the Blue Dragons in top form for the regional and, maybe, the national tournament in March.

One of those players is sophomore guard Tiylar Cotton.

Cotton was a member of last year’s team that went 35-2 en route to the NJCAA national championship. One year later, he hopes to return to the championship game as a much more experienced and well-rounded player.

Born and raised in Wichita, Cotton attended Wichita North High School, where he was a 2016 graduate. He is one of the two current players on the Blue Dragon roster who hail from Kansas.

Cotton decided to play at HutchCC because he felt they had a great coaching staff, and indeed they do. Since head coach Steve Eck’s arrival in 2009, the Blue Dragons had amassed a 231-46 record prior to this season.

Cotton played in almost every game his freshman year, only absent in five games. He  averaged 9.2 minutes per game, as he had to play behind Hutchinson all-time great guard Samajae Haynes-Jones, who now plays at Wichita State.

Throughout the year, Cotton posted solid totals for the amount of time he played. After his team won the national championship in 2017, Cotton listed it as one of his greatest accomplishments.

“Winning a national championship was an unreal feeling,” Cotton said. “We had been working all year for that, and when the time came, it seemed like a dream.”

This season is a bit different for Cotton. He now has doubled his minutes per game, and his role for the team has changed. The game against Pratt on Jan. 24 was his best game yet – he posted a double-double with 17 points and 12 rebounds, while also getting six assists.

With only four games left in the regular season, Cotton looks to stay focused

“My goals for the rest of the season are to just focus on winning the rest of our conference games,” Cotton said. “After that, then we can worry about regionals and nationals.”

The Blue Dragons are currently 21-4 (17-4 conf.) and ranked No. 14th in the country. They will next play Saturday at the Sports Arena against Cowley. It will also be the college’s annual Pink Out Night.

Holthus lecture was a touchdown

Friday, February 9th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

Mitch Holthus, the man who paints a picture with his words as “The Voice of the Kansas City Chiefs”, spoke at the first Dillon Lecture Series of the Hutchinson Community College 2018 spring semester on Tuesday at the Sports Arena.

In his speech, “Success in Being Different”, he used several examples of being different in a giving manner.

Mitch Holthus is a Smith Center native and still gives on-air and Twitter shoutouts every now and then to the Redmen. He and his wife, Tami, who is from McPherson, both graduated from Kansas State. She played basketball and later became the assistant coach for their daughter’s basketball team at Silver Lake, which won a state championship in the Sports Arena.

Along with announcing Chiefs and ESPN games, Mitch Holthus also does some things to help others. When Joplin, Missouri was devastated by a tornado, he helped provide water for the community. He also helps people within his job.

A blind man, Cameron Black, one of many affected by Mitch Holthus and his ability to speak a portrait, learned to love football because of Holthus. As shown in a video from The Kansas City Star, Holthus has made a huge impact in the man’s life because Black’s daughter, who has the same disease, also listens to the Chiefs’ games.

After seeing the video for the first time, Holthus said, “It stopped me in my tracks. If I mean everything to Cameron, if I can paint a picture verbally to someone who can’t see, I am helping someone by being different.”

Holthus also mentioned and introduced three HutchCC students in the crowd – Tyler Pauley from Garden Plain, Jeff Brandon from Hutchinson, and Ashton Hawkins from Smith Center, who all have done extraordinary things at this college, and work hard in and outside of school.

At the press conference before the event, Holthus answered questions regarding his career as a well-known sports announcer. One question that was asked pertained to a possible downfall in NFL fans in the last few years. He answered that it was a good question and that it “seems” to be a decline to some, but said that people don’t see everything with the NFL, only what is covered by reporters.

He pointed out the national anthem protests becoming a popular look on the league, but also explained that people don’t see the “behind-the scenes” action of players. Some, like Alex Smith, do remarkable things outside of the Chiefs. Smith helps foster kids earn college scholarships and donates to their organization.

Because he witnesses generous acts with the Chiefs and throughout Kansas, Mitch Holthus has a soft spot for the people and the state itself.

“I love this state, I made three career moves, yet still remained here in Kansas,” Holthus said.

He said how honored he was to speak at the Sports Arena and to share his experiences. Being from Smith Center has taught him how to be the man he is today and he seeks to find others who are different with success.

“To take the game beyond the game, it then becomes a celebration for anyone,” Holthus said.

One question that stood out to him was asked by a high school student from Inman. She asked about his love for announcing and how he became who he is today.

“Who you are and how you were raised makes you original,” Holthus said. “We all come from different home lives, but work ethic is a huge part of making an impression too.”

He stated several times that to be a good journalist, work ethic is important, but being a journalist also comes with great sacrifices. He has had to manage a family alongside his career, and although he loves what he does, Holthus expressed regrets for the moments he has missed, such as his daughter Hayley’s championship game. Brian, his son, had always dreamed of running on the Sports Arena court like his sister had. That never happened because his team never got to state.

During the lecture, Holthus presented a slideshow of the steps of differences that lead to success. Throughout his speech, he used a metaphor of floodwaters, such as the Arkansas River, or Gulf of Mexico flooding lives and trying to slow people down from reaching their ultimate goals. He explained “Empathetic Equity” – Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.

The example he used for this was one of his favorite Chiefs, Derrick Johnson, who has funded about 15 reading dens in Kansas City and does things without expecting a reward, only from the kindness of his heart. In the summer last year, Johnson spent a lot of time practicing football with a younger player who hadn’t even made it through tryouts. Holthus noticed this and thought it was generous and showed him the kind of man Johnson is aside from football.

There were many more examples and topics. One of the last differences, “Being Different by Standing Firm”, was to show that people have to work for their success and shouldn’t run from their responsibilities.

“My job is to stand the post when it’s good or bad,” Holthus said. “Many times it isn’t easy, but you still stand the post like a marine in front of the embassy.”

Finishing with the last difference where Holthus discovered his relative, who was a poor European man that moved to Nebraska and joined the Union in the Civil War. He stood shoulder to shoulder with the black men in the blue uniforms. It was a major step in the American culture, and Holthus said he was proud to be related to the man that didn’t look down upon the African American men fighting by his side.

This thought led to his final statement that we will all leave marks on the world, but “what footprints will we leave?”

 

Drama around the clock

Friday, February 9th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Staff writer

The 24-Hour Play festival is Saturday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. and is located in the BJ Warner Recital Hall in Stringer Fine Arts Center.

When it comes to the 24-Hour Play Festival, there are four skits that the students work to write, audition for, rehearse and then, finally, perform.

“Memorizing your lines can be hard because some are short and some are long,” Isaac Glover, a Hutchinson Community College student majoring in the drama said.

“Keep moving forward,” Glover said. “Don’t give up, life moves on.”

For those involved with theater and acting, drama can be both rewarding and stressful according to another drama major, Jocelyn Reed.

“There are going to be bad days and performances,” Reed said.

When Reed on the stage, she believes that the audience hardly notices her or isn’t paying attention.

“Freshmen year is good time to express yourself,” Reed said. “It gives you an open window to experience new things.”

Reed and Glover are both involved with the 24-Hour Play Festival and will be performing along with their peers on Saturday.

“It’s a lot of fun,” Reed said. “The more you fail, the more you learn. It’s more about diving into the character to get the full aspect of what you love doing the most.”

Everyone shows up at 8:30 Friday evening and does a brief introduction and audition if you’re an actor. Actors then can present any special skills they have that may be incorporated into the show.

Following this, everyone leaves except the playwrights. The playwrights write through the night and have a script done before the actors get there at 7. Then the actors and directors and technicians have until 730 that night to prepare everything needed to bring the shows to life. Curtain goes up at 730 and we see 6 new plays.

This year we have 42 people participating in various capacities

In order for any show to happen, there needs to be lighting and sound technicians, and everything has to be as spot on as possible. Reed and Glover both have experience as technicians and both said they loved it even though understanding when to cue the lights and sound at the right time is a challenge.

Deidre Ensz-Mattox, Director of Theatre at HutchCC, fell in love with theater in high school, where she acted and participated in plays.

She attended HutchCC many years ago, where she had her first college theater experience. Ensz-Mattox said she loves her work. She said she wouldn’t want to do anything else. Ensz-

She teaches all of the performance-based courses and is the faculty sponsor for the college’s chapter of Delta Psi Omega, the National Collegiate Theater Organization.

Photos: Salt City Bowl

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

Photos by Merissa Anderson

Juwaun Johnson dives into the end zone and scores a touchdown during the Salt City Bowl on Dec. 1 at Gowans Stadium.

Juwaun Johnson dives into the end zone and scores a touchdown during the Salt City Bowl on Dec. 1 at Gowans Stadium.

HutchCC theatre students headed to Iowa for competition

Friday, December 1st, 2017

By Jack Greenwood
Staff writer

Winter break is coming up, which means most students will use that time to detox from the stresses of the semester and spend time with family. However, a handful of students from Hutchinson Community College’s theatre department will be finding scripts, rehearsing scenes, preparing portfolios and presentations and perfecting performance pieces.

In January, four students will be competing for the prestigious Irene Ryan Scholarship at the region give American College Theatre Festival. The festival is an opportunity for theatre majors to be submerged in their craft and work on improving through workshops and competitions.

To compete for the scholarship, the productions that HutchCC put on had to be entered and judged. A judge would then choose two of the actors to compete, whom he felt exceeded performance quality. For their performances in the September’s “Gruesome Playground Injuries,” students Jack Greenwood, Valley Center, and Gabby Hernandez, Hutchinson, will compete. They are joined by nominees from the November production of “The Importance of Being Earnest” Jocelyn Reed, Hutchinson, and Isaac Glover, Hutchinson.

In addition to acting, students also can also explore stage makeup, costumes, playwriting, directing, stage managing, set design, dance, lighting and sound design.

Greenwood will be competing in the acting competition but has also written a 10-minute play that has been submitted for consideration for scholarship, and will possibly receive a staged concert reading.

Reed will be competing in acting and stage managing.

“It’s an honor to be representing a college that really values the success of its students and understands the importance of live theatre,” Reed said. “Theatre can expose people to different walks of life and social issues. It teaches us how to be empathetic to the plights of those different from us.”

Each acting nominee will take a partner to act with them in the competition. Partners include Dylan Kramer, McPherson, who will be Greenwood’s partner, Hannah Gomez, Hutchinson, who will be Glover’s partner, Lauren Couchman, Newton, who will be Reed’s partner and Alex Acosta, Hutchinson, who will be Hernandez’s partner.

“It’s an exciting to have this opportunity, I’m thankful,” Acosta said.

“I’m excited to get to do the workshops and to make connections,” Couchman said. “I’m also really excited to compete with Jocelyn in the Irene Ryan competition, it will be interesting to see how far we get.”

The festival also an opportunity to make professional and school connections. HutchCC students fall into region five, which consists of Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa. Most four-year colleges will be represented at the festival and have recruitment opportunities for students.
The festival also attracts theatre professionals from across the country, including Broadway. This year, famed playwright Neil Labute will be a part of the festival.

Some schools also enter their shows to be transferred to festival and will be performed again in Des Moines.

“Last year, the festival gave me the opportunity to bond with the people who are now my best friends, so I’m excited to see how the new students enjoy it,” Hernandez said. “It also helped me realize that I want to be involved in theatre for the rest of my life.”

Spreading kindness around campus

Friday, December 1st, 2017

By Emma Cox
Campus Editor

The simplest things in life can make someone’s horrible day into an amazing day.

There has been a ‘Kindness Card’ making its way around the Hutchinson Community College campus, lifting students and faculty spirits.

Sophomore Alicia Snyder came across this card in Stringer Fine Arts Center on a seating bench. “I had saw the card and wondered who had left something behind, or whose it was, so I looked at it and I saw it said ‘To whoever picks this up’ so I took it,'” Snyder said. “It made my day so much, and not only that, but it made me want to do something like it as well.”

The contents of the card are not to be revealed unless you find the card yourself, but Snyder loves the idea of it.

“The idea of kindness is something I try to stick to,” Snyder said. “If you do something nice it makes others want to do something nice as well. Just like the pay it forward movement.”

It’s not hard to be a kind person and make someone’s day. Simply giving someone a compliment like, ‘You look nice today.’ or even holding the door open for someone, can put a smile on their face.

“Kindness is something everyone should practice. Kindness is infectious and we should spread it.” Snyder said.

Whenever you get the chance, spread your kindness in any way possible to make someone’s and possibly your own.

Alumnus of HutchCC now in Kansas House of Representatives

Friday, December 1st, 2017

By Amanda Carney
Online Editor

It all started in early June when Patsy Terrell died. Kansas District 102 in the House of Representatives no longer had a representative. Jason Probst then stepped up and took on a whole new role. Probst became the new representative of the Kansas District 102 in the House of Representatives in June.

Probst had a lot to learn before the legislative session began.

A Reno County native, Probst attended Nickerson High School and later attended Hutchinson Community College.

“HCC provided me with a better education than any other school I have attended,” Probst said. “I had professors who believed in me, invested time and energy in me and made me feel like I had something valuable to contribute to the world,”

At age 19 he was expecting his first kid, a daughter, Erica. He later had a son, Mitchell, who is a current HutchCC student. Probst knows all about hard work and providing for a family.
Probst was long-time journalist and opinion writer at The Hutchinson News before becoming a politician.

Amanda Carney: How do you get more you people interested in voting, especially in non-presidential elections?

Jason Probst: This has been a difficult challenge. Voters seem to get excited about presidential campaigns, when in truth those local elections – city council, school board, state representatives – have a much more direct affect on voters’ lives. My approach is to help people understand how important these elections are to them, and how much more weight their vote carries in local elections. There have been elections here in Hutchinson that have been decided by fewer than a dozen votes.

AC: What can improve the relationship between politicians and the media?

JP: I think there needs to be some effort on both ends to make the relationship less adversarial. The relationship between the media and politicians is like any relationship – it needs to be fair and mutually respectful, and it requires nurturing from both sides. In this position, I will make mistakes. I am certain I’ll do something, or support something, unpopular. I’d hope that’s not the only time I hear from the media, because I feel like I’m doing a lot of positive work as well – much of which will likely go unreported. On the other side of things, politicians need to fairly recognize that journalists have a duty to keep the public informed, and that they’re simply doing their job, which is also very important to a free society.

AC: How important is it to fund public education?

JP: It’s vitally important to fund education. If we don’t properly educate and invest in the next generation of producers, business owners, leaders, caregivers and workers, we are asking for trouble in the future. We need to have honest, and difficult, conversations about what that education looks like going forward and how to balance those costs with all the other demands on taxpayers, but there should never be any question that education is an investment in the sort of future we hope to see – and we’ll most likely get what we pay for.

AC: What challenges do you you face being a rookie politician?

JP: There is a steep learning curve, that reaches into a variety of areas. I’ve had to consume a great deal of information from a number of people who have expertise in different professions. I’ve had to learn how to manage a very intense schedule – one that includes attending public events, reaching out to constituents, meeting with people who work in state government, and other community leaders who can talk to me about what’s going on in our community. Also, since being a legislator is considered a part time gig, and the pay matches, I’ve had to put a lot of effort into finding various contract jobs to provide some income to pay my bills. But I never expected it would be easy, particularly if it’s to be done the way I think it ought to be done.

AC: What shaped your political views?

JP: My life. I grew up relatively poor. Neither of my parents graduated high school, so the idea of going to college was a foreign idea in our household. By 19, I was about to be a father. I worked in a restaurant and made very little money.

I didn’t have health insurance. I worked like crazy to make enough money for my young family, and we often didn’t have enough. I worked jobs I didn’t like. I sometimes worked two jobs I didn’t like.

In those early days, we relied on public assistance to get by, to provide food and health care for my child. But over time, things got better. I attended college in the evenings, and worked my way into a better career.
Over the years, I feel I’ve more than repaid the help I received early on – and that early investment in my family likely changed the course of my life, and the lives of my children in a positive way. All of those experiences shaped the way I see the world.

I know firsthand how difficult it can be to keep your head above water, and I know how hopeless it can feel when year after year all you’re doing is working to survive. I’d like to help people have better opportunities to thrive, and create ways for more people to find more wealth.

This, I think, is what creates a more robust economy in which we all can participate and prosper.

Women spend more on shoes? Times have changed

Friday, December 1st, 2017

By Brenna Eller

Opinion Page Editor

The myth that women buy more shoes than men is out the window now.

Since Michael Jordan’s sneakers, Air Jordans, it seems that guys are inclined to buy more athletic shoes than women are to buying high heels. In fact, the thought of women purchasing pumps is inaccurate in today’s society as well. Many women pay for comfort over fashion now.

A student at Hutchinson Community College is one of many guys that own several pairs of athletic shoes. His name is Taylor James, from Jetmore.

“I started buying shoes senior year of high school,” James said.

He is now up to about 20 pairs. Athletic shoes have also become very expensive lately.

“My favorite brand is Nike,” James said.

Stated on forbes.com, in an article titled: The World’s Most Valuable Sports Brands, Nike shoes are one of the highest athletic brand names, and range from $80 and higher if they are brand new. James bought a pair of Gold Jordan 11’s/ retro shoes for $200. It may sound like a lot, but there is much higher than that, price wise.

Ever seen or heard a guy freak out about his new shoes getting dirty or wet? It is common with high school and college males to get upset when they have a spot of dirt on their brand new Jordans. With shoes being so expensive, it is no wonder men feel the need to take care of them like they are their pride and joy.

However, this isn’t directed to all males in this age range. There are also guys who couldn’t care less and have about two or three decent pair of shoes and for cheap prices.

Another HutchCC student, Dusty Page from Little River, shared his views on buying shoes. Unlike James, he prefers purchasing his shoes via thrift stores and second-hand stores.

“When I buy shoes, I think about the price and don’t normally spend over $50 because I like bargains from Goodwill or discount racks in any shoe store,” Page said.

Women still tend to purchase a large sum of shoes, but not as much as they used to according to executivestyle.com.

The web site states, “Women’s sales are shrinking as men’s continue to rise, in both revenue and number of pairs sold.”

When there are so many new athletic shoes being made, it is hard for some to resist the temptation of buying the newest, coolest thing. Catalogs, magazines, and commercials make new shoes harder to stay away from. There are several categories that shoes fall under, that being said, it is common to have shoes for any kind of sporting event or outdoors activity.

Whether you are the male who pays a good sum of money for a pair of brand new Nike’s and cleans their shoes often, or are the one that has only a few pairs of shoes, but pays less than half of what the other does, shoes are shoes, it just depends on the person wearing the shoes.

Cheating on finals: a widespread problem

Friday, December 1st, 2017

By Merissa Anderson

Collegian Editor

Winter break is less than a week away and while most students would rather be celebrating the end of the first semester of this school year, many are instead busy hitting the books before the college hell week packed full with finals for every class.

Of course, as many students and teachers would agree, the undeniably best way to confidently pass your finals is to review past exams, show up to class throughout the semester and to thoroughly study notes before the final exam.

Despite these option, cheating is still extremely prevalent in today’s college sphere with nearly 75 percent of college students admitting to cheating according to a study by The Boston Globe.

Student Perspective

Hutchinson Community College student and football player, Ta’Juan Williams of Daytona Beach, Florida, has seen the creative ways that students cheat on homework and tests in college.

“I’ve seen some crazy stuff,” Williams said.  “I’ve seen teachers look straight at a person while the person is throwing up the answers with their hands from across the room and then look straight at the teacher and the teachers aren’t even paying attention.”

Williams doesn’t support cheating but sympathizes with those who are cornered into doing so.

“People cheat for their grade,” Williams said. “Not everybody is that same and not everybody has the mentality to sit in a classroom and learn like everybody else does.”

Despite understanding students’ reasoning behind cheating, Williams in no way encourages it.

“I’m not saying it’s a good thing to cheat, but say you don’t know nothing at all, you’re not very talented in the classroom, then what’s your options?” Williams said. “You can either bomb the test or try to pass it by cheating.”

Williams also warns students of the repercussions that come along with cheating on college work.

“Getting kicked out of college for cheating isn’t anybody’s fault but yours,” Williams said. “If you don’t get caught, you’re going to feel very guilty about that but suck it up and say ‘hey, I got away with it this time but maybe next time I won’t have to do it and maybe next time there won’t be a next time.'”

Ultimately, Williams recommends that students simply buckle down and study so they won’t have to spend winter break regretting their decision to cheat.

“Just study,” Williams said. “Study hard and put the electronics down and get into your books. It’s finals week and you get to go home for a whole month and there ain’t no sense in reminiscing a whole month about what you coulda, woulda, shoulda did. If you want to cheat, don’t cheat – study. It’s the hardest thing to do but you’ve got to have that attention span to pass.”

Staff perspective

If studying isn’t making the class material easier to understand, then the free tutoring services in the Rimmer Learning and Resource Center may be able to assist with understanding what will be on the finals.
Kimberly Shea is a HutchCC paraprofessional and part-time math instructor and oversees the math tutoring lab.

Apart from the usual cellphones used for cheating, Shea has also witnessed a variety of creative ways that students have tried to get away with cheating.

“We’ve had a student come in with problems written on pieces of paper and we asked them what they were and he said that they were problems that he made up and he just wanted to see if he could work through them but they were actually from a take-home test,” Shea said.

“We’ve had students that would try to write on their arms or write in on their caps and act like they’re thinking and flip the cap over or slip their sleeve up.”

With the amount of work that it takes to cheat, Shea recommends simply studying.

“First of all, cheating takes a lot of effort because you have to be very creative and you spend a lot of time doing that,” Shea said. “I would just recommend, rather than cheating, spend time going back through all of the old homework assignments and exams and coming to our math lab and getting some help.”

If a student does choose to cheat during finals or any other time during the school year and gets caught, punishment could range from a zero on the assignment to being expelled from college.

“Students can get an automatic zero on exams and really it’s up to the teacher’s digression,” Shea said.
“If you take it over to the president they could be removed from the college and expelled which means they would lose their scholarships and be kicked out of the dorms in a worst case scenario.”