Archive for September 20th, 2018

Sleep-deprived studentzzzz

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

By Jared Shuff
Staff writer

The lack of sleep affects not only educational success, but physical safety as well. Without the right amount of rest, people are at risk of multiple health issues. Exhaustion can even lead to dangerous situations if not dealt with proactively.

Many students are quickly nearing a downhill slide toward poor health and physical harm. It’s time for them to take an active role in their own sleep habits.

Students don’t always make the best decisions when it comes to their sleep habits. Late night studying, among other things, is one of the biggest factors in these habits. Some students don’t even get to bed until early morning.

Jon Reed, a HutchCC freshman from Hutchinson, says he usually doesn’t get to bed until 2 a.m., and wakes up around 6 a.m. That’s only four hours of sleep.

“I feel like s— when I wake up. Usually have to drink enormous amounts of coffee to get through the day,” Reed said.

Bralen Martin, a Hutchinson sophomore, follows a somewhat similar routine. Usually he’s in bed around 3 a.m. in the morning and up by 9 a.m.

While that’s a bit better, six hours is still not nearly enough to function properly throughout the day. Does he really feel like he is getting enough sleep?

“Sort of. I feel tired in the mornings, but usually wake up as the day goes by,” Martin said.

While “sort of” is better than not, it still goes to show that students aren’t getting enough rest. This can lead to some pretty scary incidents.

“One time I almost fell asleep while driving,” Reed said. “I started to swerve, but caught myself just in time.”

Falling asleep at the wheel is a serious problem, not just for the driver, but for anyone else on the road.

Sleep deprivation can cause lasting health issues as well, both mentally and physically.

Students who get less than seven hours of sleep are more susceptible to anxiety and depression. They are also at risk of weight gain or weight loss, increased blood pressure, and extreme irritability

Lasting effects include hypertension, diabetes and heart problems.

Students should work on prioritizing work and play, as well as designating a specific sleep schedule to keep them on track. It only takes a few weeks to set an internal clock.

Sleep is a necessity for everyone, especially young students. Sleep deprivation won’t just affect grades, but cause lasting health concerns.

Career Zone there to help HutchCC students find work

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

When going to college full time, some find it a tad difficult to find a job best suited for them. Or maybe they do not know the correct way to make a resume.

Some are coming into this having had a job in high school, and some are looking for a job for the first time ever. They might have had a different focus at the time. Either way, there are systems put in place to help achieve whatever goal students are trying to accomplish through Hutchinson Community College.

HutchCC has a service on the main website called Career Zone. It has helped so many students find jobs in the area that are perfect for them. The service helps students search and apply to local and national full-time jobs, part-time jobs, and internship opportunities. It also helps create and upload resume and career portfolio to make available for employers. Students can access event announcements, career advice documents, podcasts, videos and articles. HutchCC also has a work study program if someone is looking to get a job on campus.

When discussing the issue that is getting a decent job and going to school full time with student Brianna MacLean, a Belleville sophomore, she said that if you are wanting to work at a specific place, or have something in mind that is not restaurant or retail related, good luck.

After asking how difficult is it to snag a job while in school, MacLean said that it probably is not that hard, and that you could easily get a job at Walmart, or somewhere like that.

Trying to keep her grades up while working is always a struggle for her. MacLean also said how stressful it is trying to find a place to work in Hutchinson once the school year has already begun. MacLean said good places to apply would be hotels or any retail store. After August rolls around, all the decent jobs are taken, and you are forced to apply at fast food places.

“And no one has a good time doing either of those … ever,” MacLean said.

After asking if she had heard of Career Zone and what help it could be to the students of HutchCC, MacLean was shocked that she had never heard a thing about it.

 

Eight Tips from HutchCC counselor Debra Graber

1. Sometimes you just need a job to give you job experience. Someone to vouch that you are a capable human, other than your parents, teachers or coaches.
2. Find a part-time job, an internship that’s in an area of interest.
3. Apply at as many places as possible.
4. Develop a good resume.
5. Even if you haven’t had a job before you can put what experiences you’ve had, what things are you good at. You can have a resume without having previous job experience.
6. Don’t be picky!
7. Ideally if you could find a job that’s going to match up with some things you’ve done in the past then it’ll be more enjoyable to go to work.
8. Networking, ask instructors, friends, family members. A large percentage of jobs aren’t advertised! It’s word of mouth or recommendations.

Marvelous Moeder: Hutch native one of conference’s top goal scorers

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Brailey Moeder scores on a penalty kick against Barton.

By Rebecca Carney
Co-Sports Editor

Hutchinson Community College soccer player Brailey Moeder is not your average player.

She was a former Hutchinson High School standout and came to play soccer at HutchCC under coach Sammy Lane. Moeder was not always a standout soccer player, though. Throughout high school, Moeder worked hard and showed her coaches what a talented player she is. Now, as a sophomore forward for HutchCC, Moeder is one of the top forwards and goal scorers in the Jayhawk West Conference.

As Moeder’s sophomore year of college rolled around, she continued to standout. Out of the first six games the women’s soccer team has played this season, Brailey started in five of them. In those six games, she scored six goals, with two of them being a game winning goal. She has six assists and made one penalty kick, tying the game against Barton in a thrilling 3-3 tie.

Moeder has been a key player in the soccer’s team success this season and Lane has noticed.

“Brailey has stepped up for us,” Lane said, “I admire that.”

There is one game, in particular, where Moeder has stepped up the most. When the Blue Dragons played Barton Community College in early September, Brailey had a standout game.  Late in the game, with the soccer team trailing 3-2, the Blue Dragons were awarded a penalty kick, and Moeder was the brave soul who decided to take the shot.

Moeder ended up scoring the goal, tying the game against Barton.

“It gave me chills, to be honest. It was a lot of pressure and it was amazing,” Moeder said.

Throughout the years, Moeder has improved tremendously as a soccer player, but not without a little hard work. For Moeder, it was nice to finally see that hard work pay off saying, “There’s always room for improvement. I’m not just going to settle for what I thought was a good goal. That’s not me, I want to be better than that.”

Moeder has worked hard throughout the years to become the soccer player she is today. The results are something that Brailey is pleased with and hopes to see more of in the future.

Student/Instructor communication (Why can’t we be friends)

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

By Brenna Eller
Collegian Editor-In-Chief

As Hutchinson Community College is a junior college, the students and instructors have more one-on-one interaction than that of a four-year school, where the professor might not even know the names of his or her students.

That being said, broader communication is often expected of a teacher from the students.

Also, just getting out of high school, where teachers cared whether or not you pass because it is a reflection on them as a teacher, versus coming here to find out that being an adult, the instructors aren’t there to make sure you do everything right and get homework in on time. That is mainly up to the students and their responsibility to balance their lives accordingly to their academics.

Some students believe that instructors communicate a fair amount, while others view the communication is lacking.

HutchCC freshman Autumn Frickey, Lindsborg, gave her views on teacher-student communication.

“Honestly, the instructors I’ve had don’t communicate as I thought they would, and it’s just easier to ask friends or people in class for help,” Frickey said.

Frickey makes the argument that instructors should check their email more often and that checking emails is the overall issue for articulation with instructors.

When asked what her preferred method of communication, Frickey said, “I would talk to my teachers face-to-face, but normally they have to rush to their next class to get ready, so email is better.”

Since communication is generally a two-way deal, and not all of the responsibility is on the instructor, Frickey said, “Some students should ask questions earlier, but I feel as if it is both the student and the teacher’s fault. However, the school isn’t that big and I feel like they should be more one-on-one with the students.”

Sociology instructor Kim Newberry, who has worked at the college for more than a decade, shared her thoughts on communication between her students, and agrees that it is lacking not only between students, but everywhere.

“I have students that will email a question when they are sitting in my class and could ask right then,” Newberry said.

Sometimes classes can fluctuate when it comes to being social and in Newberry’s case, she recognizes that one class of hers is very quiet where no one hardly talks while other classes seem to carry conversations just fine.

Newberry said the reason for the inadequacy which she believes is that students would rather be on their phones or listening to music.

The most appropriate form of communication to Newberry would be to speak to one another in person. “Email is great for quick communication, but face-to-face is always bet for anything serious,” Newberry said.

When asked how this issue could be resolved, Newberry said, “If a student has an issue, he or she needs to learn how to communicate, most of us only want our students to succeed, and we cannot help if we do not know that there is a problem.”

Also when it comes to discussion between students and instructors, Newberry said that seeing each other in person should be the norm for all relationships.

“So many nuances of communication can be lost in an email or a text,” Newberry said.

Amber Brawner, coordinator/instructor of the visual media design program who has been at HutchCC for about 12 and a half years, shared her expectations of communication from her students lately.

“Communication is definitely a two-way street,” Brawner said. “It’s frustrating when students just walk out of the class without saying a word because oftentimes they miss material that is on a test or instructions for an assignment, and then wonder why they get the grade that they got.”

She also said that it is irritating when that same student doesn’t talk to her about their grade and how to get extra credit.

The Women’s Corner: The double standards of pronouns

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Tabitha Barr

Since the beginning of our lives, we are accustomed to the pronouns of the adults in charge. Through school, we call our teachers by a pronoun followed by their last name. But recently, I’ve come across a double standard for this simple action. We call male adults “Mr.” but we call female adults by three different pronouns, and it doesn’t make any sense to me.

I never questioned it growing up, because it was just what you did. However, now that I’m older and I have more feministic genes in my brain, I’m kinda pissed about it.

A woman that is not married goes by “Miss”. For a woman who is married, we call them “Mrs.” But when either of those things are in place, we can also call them “Ms.” Now why in the world do females have three different pronouns, when males only have one?

Why do people need to know our relationship status? We shouldn’t be defined by our relationships with another person. We are not dependent on others to get the job done, so why should we be called by Mrs., Ms., or Miss?

Not only are we defined by our marital status, but we are judged on our age. Mrs. is based on marriage, but is also seen as mid-aged and older women. Miss is used for those who are younger. But Ms. is supposed to be used for both married and unmarried women, but we all know that most people use this term when speaking with older ladies.

Why is this a thing? Why are women put in a judgmental box and given a name of what to be defined by? It’s such a big, but sutble, double standard that needs to change.

But change is hard in a society where new ideas are shut down without a second thought. Women are still being treated unfairly with unequal pay, and everything else that is wrapped up into being a female. Do we really need to fight for something this little?

When asking a close male friend, he said it doesn’t matter. He’s never thought of it that way and it’s not that big of a deal, which it shouldn’t be, but it truly is. I have to go through my whole life being defined on whether I am single or married. Why? If a man isn’t, why should any woman be?

Women are facing so much in this day and age and this shouldn’t even be one of the things we have to fight for. It should just be common sense and gotten rid of. It will give us as women more confidence in our lives. We won’t be judged based on our marital status, nor our age. We can actually be our own person!

Let’s stand together and fight. We are independent women who don’t need any pronouns.

Tabitha Barr is a Nickerson freshman in Media Communications