Archive for May 7th, 2018

Baseball team ready for some ‘clubhouse jacks’

Monday, May 7th, 2018

A look inside the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A broken window and peeling paint are prominent at the current clubhouse and locker room at Hobart-Detter Field.

A wind gust blew off a set of lights near right field at Hobart-Detter Field, damaging a bathroom.

The light pole that lost the lights during a wind storm.

A look at the current clubhouse being built beyond the left-field wall.

By Brenna Eller
Opinion Page Editor

The Hutchinson Community College baseball team is expecting a new clubhouse soon. It has been long overdue for this installment at Hobart-Detter Field.

The new amenities featured in the clubhouse, which will be located about 50 feet behind the left-field fence, include – a new maintenance facility for half of the building, and the other half will be used as a locker room, laundry area, bathroom, coaches’ office and umpire locker room.

The clubhouse will also be used by the Hutchinson Monarchs, a summer collegiate wood-bat baseball team.

“The city is funding the building,” said HutchCC baseball coach Ryan Schmidt. “We are extremely excited about the building.”

Schmidt also said that the new building will help compete against others in the Blue Dragons’ conference – the Jayhawk West – that have modern clubhouses and enhance help in recruiting.

“We can’t thank the City of Hutchinson enough for seeing this project through and giving our players a great space to call home,” Schmidt said.

The old clubhouse with its busted windows and chipped paint looks just as bad on the inside as it does on the outside. In addition to chipped paint and broken windows is a foul odor wafting inside the clubhouse.

The team is looking forward to having a location for private meetings and more room for equipment.

HutchCC freshman, Dylan Nedved said, “I’m so excited for it, we’re going to hit a lot of clubhouse jacks. We’re going to put some holes in that roof.”

Nedved said the phrase, “clubhouse jacks” is an inside joke and another way of saying hitting home runs that hit the roof of the clubhouse.

Another freshman, Cameron Crandall, shared his excitement for the new clubhouse.

“I think everyone will realize how much space we have now instead of being crowded in our old one,” Crandall said.

Along with the new clubhouse being built, new light fixtures are expected to be put on the field within a year. Damage from the wind April 18 caused one set of lights to fall on the first-base-side restroom building at the baseball field. Only about one-third of the roof was damaged.

 

 

Letter from the Editor to our Readers: Thank you

Monday, May 7th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

The Hutchinson Collegian, over the course of the last two years that I have served on the staff, has changed massively, but not without the help and encouragement from our readers like you.

Coming into this new school year, The Collegian staff was, except for me, entirely new. Over the summer, I was so, so afraid that our newspaper would cease to exist without a staff or advisor but, not only did we survive, we thrived with our new brand new staff, most straight out of high school and our amazing advisor, Brad Hallier.

We want to thank our readers for picking up our papers, for the encouraging comments and for working with us when we pursue a story. Producing a weekly paper with a largely volunteer staff has not always been easy, but it always got done, and we have been continually proud of what we call our ‘weekly miracle’.

Next year, in a more fortunate turn of events for her, Brenna Eller will become editor of The Collegian, and many more current members of our staff will be returning, along with the many new students who have enrolled so far.

In addition to being a campus newspaper, we are a class. Behind these pages are students working to deliver what we believe to be important campus information and learning, sometimes for the first time, how to produce a proper story and design a page.

But our staff certainly did something right with our new education, collectively we brought home multiple awards of which we couldn’t be prouder.

But, without our paper boxes emptying out week after week, truly the newspaper would cease to exist.

So continue reading your college newspaper, tell our new staffers next year how well they’re doing, and feel free to provide recommendations and story ideas, of any kind. Encourage your fellow students or staff members to become a regular reader, and follow The Collegian social media.

The continued support of our readers means that some new journalism student will perhaps gain a larger passion for the career and continue to pursue journalism for a lifetime.

 

Student provides insight on North Korean peace

Monday, May 7th, 2018

History has been shifting the last few weeks with the news that North Korea has finally agreed to offer peace to South Korea and the United States.

In general, western news outlets have praised North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for this action, and many comments on articles are in support of the historic decision.

A Hutchinson Community College student with strong interest in international affairs has been approached by peers for comment on the peace offering and, although he said he is required to remain anonymous, has agreed to an interview with The Hutchinson Collegian.

The Western Media

Perhaps his biggest concern is the glorification of the deal by Western media.

“What I’m seeing right now is a gross manifestation of the South Korean liberal government apologetic movement that embraces North Korea very blindly,” he said. “When I see news comments that people leave on Facebook, they’re all for it and they don’t seem to cast a shadow of doubt in this current state of affairs where (the South Korean and American) government seems to make a peace accord with North Korea without any predisposition whatsoever against North Korea.

“American news outlets are handling the situation absolutely horribly. The thing about the U.S and South Korean media is that they beautify and they benevolize the North Korean authorities in the grossest manner. For example, in the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, the North Korean invoice visited South Korea, and I came across a few CNN articles, and I was absolutely aghast because the headlines were ‘Look at how Kim Jong-un’s sister handles herself in such a graceful manner.’ ‘Look at her fashion.’ ‘Look at how she gracefully does whatever.’ Do they have any idea what is going on in North Korea?”

The largest player in creating a false narrative of true peace, according to the student, is the news that is wrapped up in embracing, without doubt, the peace deal.

“The thing about the media today is they’re incredibly selective, and you should be equally selective to counter that effect,” he said. “You should be very critical to begin with, and especially if they start reporting their own opinions mixed in with the agendas that they are trying to push. People have been flooded with the one-sided information of North Korea, and you should start being skeptical and looking at the facts.”

The Hidden Horrors

The peace agreement, though not malicious on the surface, has been a cause of concern for many who know what happens behind North Korea’s borders.

“Everyone thinks of North Korea as some sort of joke but it is a very, very dangerous atmosphere there,” he said.

Although the historic event is newsworthy, there is yet to be proof that North Korea is willing to change.

“As far as I’m concerned, they have not displayed a single shred of evidence of commitment towards peace or the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” he said. “North Korea is the most violent, most radical state actor that practices Marxist-Leninism in the most pathological fashion.”

After recent events, the source had been approached by several curious peers seeking insight from their politically-inclined friend.

“When people ask me how I would describe North Korea in a very simple fashion, I tell them that North Korea is like a pressure cooker ready to blow,” he said. “The level of deceit among the commoners in North Korea is beyond your imagination. People are dying of starvation every day and people try to defect from North Korea, even though it means certain death for them and their family, if they get caught. They’re defecting at a rate that has been unprecedented before, so that should speak some volumes about what the state of of North Korea is like.”

The student doubts North Korea’s willingness to denuclearize due to their dependence on the alternative weapons.

“What North Korea has done is a very dangerous move,” he said. “Both nations supposedly agreed to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, which made me giggle quite hard because North Korea has not shown a shred of evidence towards denuclearization. They changed their entire rhetoric three months ago when before that they had constantly said, consistently, that they were going to pursue the nuclear weapons program.”

Without their nuclear weapons, he said he believes North Korea would fall to South Korea.

“North Korea’s entire regime hinges upon the asymmetrical and unconventional warfare capabilities that are in the form of nuclear weapons,” he said. “It transcends any other countries dependence on such program because North Korea has the largest military, in terms of sheer number. Every citizen is mandated to serve for at least a decade. But without nuclear weapons or CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense) capabilities, South Korea alone, without even U.S support, could crush North Korea.”

Assuming that South Korea, the United States and North Korea can come to a mutual agreement, the student believes there should be strict stipulations.

America’s Involvement

“The U.S will undoubtedly play a major role in this situation, because the U.S is South Korea’s closest ally,” He said. “I have no doubt that President Trump will pursue a goal that will be in America’s best interests, but a real danger that I see is a parallel to Obama’s Iran Nuclear Deal. The false narrative Obama propagated throughout the media was that it was a win, when it was clearly not. It’s still being bashed from the whole political spectrum, because it granted Iran the right to pursue their own nuclear interest. The false narrative in which leaders create to show themselves as a winner is the same risk that I see Trump repeating for himself.”

Perhaps more worrying for the student is the number of American protesters supporting the same ideology that dictates North Korea.

“The fundamental tenets of the political left and communism are very similar in nature,” He said. “They call out for equality of outcome and they importance of group identity trumping individual characteristics and violence if they don’t agree with you. The reason I say communism is a murderous ideology, and I say that for a very good reason, is that just take a look at history. People have forgotten the simple truth of life that grass is green, the sky is blue, and communists cannot be trusted.”

The student said that he believes that many people waving the communist flag, whether they do so ironically or not, are oblivious to the horrors that exist within communist North Korea.

“Imagine someone doing that with a Nazi flag – you have an immediate response to that because Nazis have committed horrible atrocities in the 20th century,” he said. “The communist flag represents the same. They are completely oblivious to the havoc that these communist and Marxist ideologies have wrought upon the world.”

Retiring EMS advisor reflects on teaching career

Monday, May 7th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Online Editor

Dan Jones is a Hutchinson Community College Emergency Medical Service advisor and has been helping out students and helping them make their dreams come true.
Jones has worked at the college for more than 20 years, teaching even as he continued to work in hospitals and with patients.
“I was ready for a change in that point in my life, and so I become a clinical coordinator, and so I would go around Wichita, Salina and Hutch and take students to their clinical settings in the hospital, because that was my area of expertise,” Jones said. “Then I got interested in the classroom, I got my instructor license, in the state to teach in. I got that in 1986, and so I kind of liked going in the classroom, and that was around 2000.
Jones said he worked in the Emergency Medical Technician field, and EMS was the embodiment of medical.
“Doing it on the wing and a prayer, and you don’t have the doctors and the people in the field to help you, and I thought it was interesting,” Jones said. “EMS is more of a specialty area, a jack-of-all-trades. They were the specialty in the crisis situation, so I was always thought that was interesting within EMS.
Jones said he had a lot of students through the years, and he had to change his approach on how kids learned. He said it was a challenge at times, that’s one reason why he wanted to retire.
“It’s getting harder, all the changes, one thing in especially in EMS and medicine and education is that there’s change, and it’s getting a bit harder on the change. I still go with the flow, but it’s been an interesting 23 years at the college. I’ve had different roles, but my favorite would be the classroom.”
Not to say the classroom was easy, but Jones said it was rewarding.
“I’ve had kids with challenges, and they overcome the challenges to get through, and you knew that they wouldn’t be a paramedic. They knew their spot, and would be a good EMT. With specific ones – there have been too many to pick out – but I had one and you could tell she was smart, and it went in the classroom socially inept, and through the class, she really came a long way, and I’ve helped her along the way with that. She’s a paramedic now, and there was a time where I thought I don’t know if she was going to make it or not. But if it’s something I learned, it’s not to give up too early.”

Student Government encourages campus involvement

Monday, May 7th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Online Editor

Seth Yenni and Cade Lohrding are Hutchinson Community College students who are trying to get students involved with Student Government Association.
Lohrding is next year’s SGA president. A Lindsborg native, his major is computer science, while Yenni – next year’s vice president – is from Coldwater, and his major is political science. Both students are freshmen.
Here are Yenni’s and Lohrding’s thoughts on SGA and what they hope to accomplish during their tenure.
What made you guys want to run for SGA?
Lohrding – I would say part of it was being a part of it this year, and watching our president this year, Lane Wiens, he did great a job during SGA this year, and he’s done a lot of good for the group, for the college, and I just wanted to be a part of it and keep the good going.
Yenni – The new stuff with RASK, if you’ve heard about that, bringing positive and good stuff around campus, and those things we started and just keeping it going.
Lohrding – To try and keep what Lane is doing, he’s doing a really good job. Everyone is going to make changes, and I feel like we are going to bring positive changes, but for the most part it’s going to be a  good year, next year.
What do you plan on accomplishing in the next year?
Yenni – We actually had talked about this in our last meeting, and I was reading out of The Collegian, and how it’s talking about the Blue Dragons sporting events, and people basically don’t know about them, or the Spring Fling last week. One thing that we’ve wanted to accomplish is, next year, communication between the college and the students. We talk to a lot of students, and things like that and they don’t know what things are going on. What’s the best way social media? You know, do students even check their email? That’s one issue we want to tackle, to see how can we get better communication between a faculty and students for events, especially things that students are interested in.
Cade – After reading through the constitution a couple times, I defiantly want to make some changes in that, like Seth said, try to communicate with students better, so we can have more students participate.
What have you guys been involved in with SGA?
Cade – We help the honors kids, we help clean up around campus, this week we’re helping the Red Flag Campaign, and just yesterday we went and did arts and crafts with the kids at the daycare.
Seth – Working with other groups, governing groups, and sanctioned two new groups, Self-Sufficient and Cosmetology Club, and working with funding for those groups and other groups that need funding, especially a group who has a great community service project. SGA, we would want to help them. And if we can be a part of it too, then it’s all the better. That’s what SGA is here for, to help out with anything on campus.
Do you guys want a bigger presence here on campus?
Cade – More people involved in SGA. As soon as we had elections, there was only like six people on there, and we can have up to 22, but we only have like 10 or 12 people on SGA.
Seth – We would want more to participate. It’s not a huge time commitment.
Cade – It’s about an hour a week.
Seth – We have our meetings 4:30 (p.m.) on Tuesday, which is open to all students. You don’t have to be a part of SGA to come. If anyone is interested in running for a certain position, talk to anyone in SGA, either Kade or I. We can definitely answer any questions that you might have.
Cade – You also get a book scholarship too. It gives back if you give back.

Seth – It’s not a very difficult election process, especially in the fall, and you write a paragraph that goes on Dragon Zone.
Cade – As long as there is one person.
Seth – As long as you vote for yourself, you’ll make it.
What made you guys run for SGA?
Kade – To make a difference.
Seth – Last year, when Wiens … I’ve know him previous years before HutchCC and he had talked to me and told me about it, and I was interested in it, and I enjoyed it a lot. Lane did a lot of recruiting, and I hope next year I can do the same.