Archive for April, 2018

Scenes from Monday’s Spring Fling

Tuesday, April 24th, 2018

Photos by Brenna Eller

The fellas claimed to be the winners. Checking to confirm.

The “winners” celebrate their victory. They claimed victory, at least. Checking to confirm …

Action packed race! Much like the Daytona 500!

Student publications rake in awards after hard year’s work

Friday, April 20th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

The Hutchinson Community College publications, the Dragon’s Tale magazine and The Hutchinson Collegian has made its mark on Kansas journalism after receiving multiple high awards at the April 8-9 Kansas Collegiate Media conference.

The Hutchinson Collegian and Dragon’s Tale Magazine rallied their staff members to attend the conference during a two day stay at the Drury Inn in Wichita.

In addition to several staff awards, many individual staff members received recognition for their hard work throughout the school year.

College newspapers, yearbooks, and magazines throughout Kansas submit their top works, ranging from news stories to web design, in hopes of being selected as the top entry in each category.

All two year colleges compete against one another, while four year colleges and four year private colleges have their own separate divisions. However, several overall awards were also given which allow schools of all sizes to compete against one another.

In addition to the awards ceremonies, which took place over the course of dinner on Saturday and lunch on Sunday, students were encouraged to mingle with other student journalists from across the state and attend different lectures from local professional journalists.

AWARDS WON

Two-Year College Division Journalist of the Year

Winner – Merissa Anderson

Runner-up – Allie Schweizer

All School Individual Awards

Honorable Mention in Ad Design – Monica Pulliam (Dragon’s Tale)

Honorable Mention in Illustration & Infographics – Kourtney Sweet (Collegian)

Honorable Mention in Printed Photo Essay – Allie Schweizer (Dragon’s Tale)

Two-Year College Division

2nd Place in Copy Editing – Merissa Anderson (Collegian)

Two-Year Newspaper

2nd Place in Column Writing – Merissa Anderson

2nd Place in Feature Writing – Merissa Anderson

2nd Place in News Writing & Reporting – Merissa Anderson

1st Place in News Writing & Reporting – Merissa Anderson

2nd Place in Page Design – Brenna Eller

Honorable Mention in Special Sections – Collegian Staff

3rd Place in Sports Feature Writing – Lucas Barlow

1st Place in Sports Feature Writing – Lucas Barlow

Honorable Mention in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

Honorable Mention in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

2nd Place in Sports/Action Photography – Merissa Anderson

1st Place in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

The Hutchinson Collegian newspaper

Overall Silver Medalist in the two-year newspaper division

Yearbook & Magazine

Honorable Mention in Feature Photography – Taryn Gillespie

Honorable Mention in Headlines – Dustin Curiel

Honorable Mention in News & Event Writing – Megan Ryan

Honorable Mention in News/Event Photography – Allie Schweizer

3rd Place in News/Event Photography – Allie Schweizer

3rd Place in Table of Contents – Dustin Curiel

2nd Place in Table of Contents – Dustin Curiel

Honorable Mention in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

3rd Place in Sports/Action Photography – Allie Schweizer

 

Dragon’s Tale magazine

Overall Gold Medalist & All-Kansas Award in the magazine division

What are the HutchCC Honors Projects? The students share their ideas

Friday, April 20th, 2018

Student: Garrett Allee’
Hometown: Viola
Major: Engineering
Honors project: Designing an auto-cap program and 3D printing for an iPhone 7 case.
Project explanation: Garret ale- I am designing an auto cap program and 3D printing for an IPhone 7 cases, in high school my engineering teacher actually decided to 3D print phone cases with the school logo and I wanted to try for myself and it just sparked it for me as well. Mine is more physical meaning I have all my past prints like physical done and I can show people them and show what went wrong and what I needed to change and I can also show pictures of my auto cap program. after I am done with Hutchinson I plan on transferring to K-state once I get there hopefully I’ll make a choice because at hutch they only have pre-engineering and as far as KSU has classes that offer that degree and so that’s what I hope to experience when I go to KSU

Student: Bianca Gutierrez
Hometown: Halstead
Major: Pre-Nursing
Honors project: Researching immunotherapy.
Project explanation: I have a partner and we are researching immunotherapy we are interviewing an oncologist and putting that in our paper so we get someone in the medical field perspective on that. Immunotherapy is the treatment of cancer cells using one’s own immune system cells and normally It’s your own body’s cell that go rouge and it’s injecting the body with a certain disease that the immune system, can recognize and you use to attack the cancer cells. immunotherapy did spark our interested because it’s not something that is being used, not widely and It’s being improved and so we are doing the research on how it works, and why it works and it can impact cancer patients in the future.

Student: Alex Ratzlaff
Hometown: Hutchinson
Major: Computer Science
Honors project: Exploring the relationship between news-media choice and your response to the news being reported on.
Project explanation: Mine is about the relationship between your choice of news media and your response to the news being reported on, for example if you were like you were responding to a post to the Washington post about the walk out, you would be more likely to be supportive for them, than you were on fox news.

Student: Bret Sauvage
Hometown: Falun
Major: Pre-Radiology
Honors project: Research on epigenetics and anxiety, and how epigenetics could be used to mediate or eliminate the effects of anxiety.
Project explanation: Brett Sauvage-  I am doing a research paper that as to be 10-15 pages on epigenetics and anxiety, and how the use of epigenetics could be able to mediate or eliminate it entire the effects of anxiety on people, or anxiety disorders for that matter.

Student: Lilly Ward
Hometown: Wichita
Major: History
Honors project: A cultural analysis over the Greek gods Poseidon and Athena.
Project explanation: “The two and how they been portrayed throughout the centuries, how each cultural there portray has been conflicted of the cultural. I love history and especially mythology and ancient history of geek. Basically anything geek or roman, it just fascinates me. And so that’s why I decided to choose mine and make it history related said Ward for mine I have to write a 15 page over it.

Student: Rachel Wright
Hometown: Little River
Major: Accounting
Honors Project: Crocheting, making a corner-to-corner throw, and benefiting the community.
Project Explanation: For the project, I had to write a research paper on crocheting and how it could be beneficial to individuals and their community. I have spent a lot of hours working on this, 50 at least. It seems like I’m finishing a lot, then I look at what I did and it doesn’t seem like much compared to all of the work I’ve put in. I don’t know what made me want to crochet when I was little, but it’s a great and kind of unique skill to have.

Editorial: There should be age, term limits for those in Congress

Friday, April 20th, 2018

Social media and the many qualms that surround it has recently come into a blinding legal spotlight focusing on the possibility of users’ personal data being shared or sold to third party companies and advertisers.

Mark Zuckerberg, the billionaire founder of Facebook, then testified before Congress to address the issue of data breaches and, although the time could have been beneficial for the intently listening public, Zuckerberg was instead pelted with off-base, ill-informed questions from many elderly and middle-aged Congress members who clearly had no idea how Facebook or other social media platforms function.

This begs the question; at what point is Congress, of which the average age is nearly 60, out of touch with the younger generations whose futures they are shaping?

Plenty of video compilations of the ridiculous questions, and memes about Zuckerberg’s confusion have been created and shared across, you guessed it, social media. But one thing Congress didn’t seem to understand is that data that Facebook stores, is all willingly given by those who willingly join the platform.

Just as teachers and real-estate agents have to continually build knowledge and stay updated on the current events, why are members of Congress not held to the same standards?

There are plenty of issues that could and should be addressed about social media platform but unfortunately, these people were in no way qualified to ask such complex questions about a subject that they seemingly did not comprehend.

How do we fix this? There’s not one simple answer. Many have suggested age or term limits for members of Congress. But then where would be the cut-off be for discriminating on age in other careers?

Others have suggested passing a test on current events and trends every year. This is perhaps more plausible and non-discriminatory. The fact is, that a Congress more than 40 years older than the incoming adults, cannot make the best decisions for those who are the future of America. But, maybe no age limits or tests should be put in place. Perhaps the younger generations who are annoyed the with competency of Congress should instead take action and elect younger officials who better understand current technology and who can make better decisions and ask better questions about their future.

Honors program students thrive with leadership from Ryan Diehl

Friday, April 20th, 2018

By Pablo Sanchez
Online Editor

The Hutchinson Community College Honor’s Project is still going strong, nearly 25 years after its birth.

Ryan Diehl, HutchCC Curriculum and Program Improvement Coordinator, is the Honor’s Project Coordinator.

“The Honor’s Project dates back to the inception of the honor’s program, back in 1993 and 1994, and some of the students talked about how it’s a requirement of their scholarship,” Diehl said. “It’s tied to the Presidential, Presidential Gold and the Honors Merriment Scholarship.”

Diehl said a lot of the students are in the ED15H honors success seminar, and during the fall semester, students brainstorm different topics, and some students have majors that they want to go into.

Other students explore different fields, and Diehl’s role is to help them find a faculty mentor.

“They get together and start working in the spring, and what happens in the spring time, their very first assignment is to complete a proposal agreement with their faculty mentor,” Diehl said. “Then the honors sub committee reviews all the proposals, and then we offer feedback. We either approve them or approve them with some changes that need to be made, or we say ‘you need to come up with a better topic.’

“A majority of the time, it’s either approved or approved with a few changes. The only ones we rejected are projects they aren’t complicated. We try to look for creativity or some contributions to the field. It’s not something you go about and read a Wikipedia entry.”

Athlete of the week: softball player Izzy Godinez

Friday, April 20th, 2018

The week: Godinez, a sophomore from Hutchinson, had a good week in leading the Blue Dragons to five key wins in six Region 6 games. The shortstop had 11 hits in 26 at-bats, and she had two doubles, a triple and a pair of home runs. She also scored six runs.

The season: Godinez is having a strong season, leading a powerful Blue Dragon offense with a .438 batting average. She has four home runs, 27 RBIs, and a team-best 56 hits and team-best 38 runs scored.

Astronaut Capt. Scott Kelly inspires crowd

Friday, April 20th, 2018

By Merissa Anderson
Collegian Editor

On April 17, one of the largest crowds the Dillon Lecture Series has ever seen, more than 4,000 people, gathered to listen to astronaut Capt. Scott Kelly, as he inspired the crowd with his speech and reminded them that “the sky is not the limit”.

From the second Kelly stepped on stage to a standing ovation, he told the story of how he transformed himself from class-skipping college student to a beloved and historic astronaut with nearly six million current twitter followers.

“When I was a kid growing up, I was a really, really bad student,” Kelly said, speaking to the hundreds of elementary to high school students from surrounding school districts. “I wanted to do anything else besides be a student.”

Kelly told of his difficulties with ADD and ADHD throughout his primary schooling before explaining that these issues continued to plague him in his first years of college.

“I was still struggling,” Kelly said. “I couldn’t pay attention. I couldn’t study. Eventually, I’m not even going to class anymore.”

But one book from his campus bookstore transformed his life.

“One day, I’m wandering across campus and happen to go into the bookstore to buy gum or something, and I see this book on the shelf,” Kelly said. “I was interested enough that I took my gum money, purchased the book, went back to my dorm room and laid there for the next three days on my unmade dorm room bed and read the stories.”

The book was “The Right Stuff” by Tom Wolfe which told of how astronauts during earlier space travel reached their success.

“If I could just become a better student, maybe I could one day become an astronaut,” Kelly said.

And he did.

The rest of Kelly’s speech followed his adventures and mishaps that he experienced during his more than 500 days in space, while the crowd, packed shoulder-to-shoulder, listened intently on.

Although a career as an astronaut requires intense focus and drive to study, Kelly certainly kept his humor throughout his travels, and he sprinkled his speech with plenty of jokes to keep the crowd entertained and smiling.

“If we can dream it, we can do it,” Kelly said.

“If we have a plan, if we’re willing to take the the risks and make mistakes, if we focus on the things we can control and ignore what we can’t, if we test the status-quo and if we work as a team, because teamwork makes the dream work, and if we do that, then the sky is definitely not the limit.”

Rhymes, Mickens earn All-American status

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

On Tuesday, Hutchinson Community College sophomore guard, J.J. Rhymes was named first-team NJCAA All-American along with Jayhawk Conference Player of the year. His honor marks the third-year-straight that the HutchCC men’s basketball team has had a player in the first-team NJCAA All-American.

Rhymes played as a freshman and contributed to win a national championship in 2017, and this year carried the Blue Dragons to the NJCAA National Tournament again.

Rhymes hit his career-high of 41 points December 6, against Butler 82-80. Rhymes hit the game-winning shot with a 3-pointer as the buzzer went off.

In addition to his career-high, Rhymes became number 11 in Blue Dragon history to score 700 points in a season with 704 total points. He also made the career Top 10 scoring list, placing with 1,295 points.

Rhymes is one of two Jayhawk Conference players to have earned a spot in the All-American this 2018 season. The second being Coffeyville guard Travis Washington.

National track meet returning to Hutchinson

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

Hutchinson Community College will be the host school for the 2020 NJCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championship, the NJCAA announced on Tuesday.

Gowans Stadium will be where the events will take place May 14-16 2020, except for the throwing events. The discus and shot put will be on the grass field northeast of Gowans, the javelin at Don Michael Field, and the hammer throw will be Fairgrounds Park.

Hutchinson also was the championship host in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2017.

Hutchinson has become something of a hub for the NJCAA to stage national championships. The men’s basketball championship has been in Hutchinson since 1949. The Division 1 Volleyball Championship was at the Sports Arena last November and will be there the next two Novembers.

The Salt City Bowl football game has been in Hutchinson since 2009

Possibility of Kansas State Fair moving from Hutchinson now seems unlikely

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

Word has been going around about possible removal of The Kansas State Fair from Hutchinson.

This came about after a bill was passed by State Rep. Don Schroeder, R-Hesston, which if it passed, would have allowed the State Fair Board to seek proposals from cities that had an interest in hosting the fair.

However, State Sen. Ed Berger, R-Hutchinson and former Hutchinson Community College president, introduced a bill, allowing state sales tax to be collected by and returned to the fair, but only if the fair stayed in Hutchinson. According to an article from The Hutchinson News, “Funds will end if the State Fair leaves the city limits of Hutchinson.”

Hutchinson Community College Director of Marketing and Public Relations Denny Stoecklein began his 20-year-involvement with the State Fair in 1995. His duties were to find corporate sponsorships, scheduling events happening during the fair, and was held responsible for marketing uses of the fairgrounds off-season as well.

After four years, Stoecklein was promoted to Assistant Manager, and in 2003, was titled General Manager. Stoecklein served that role until July 2015, when he was given the opportunity to be PR and Director of Marketing by HutchCC.

“With a history that dates back 100 years in Hutchinson and Reno County, I think the State Fair is quite secure where it’s at,” Stoecklein said. “Fairs are about tradition, traditions that vary with each person.”

When asked how the city of Hutchinson and the college would be affected if the State Fair was to be moved, Stoecklein said that there would be a huge impact, since the fair generates tens of millions of dollars annually, from the fair and many other events, non-fair related that utilize the buildings throughout the years.

Stoecklein said that HutchCC benefits from the fair through marketing offers to potential students, and provides a connection with current and former students.

“Just last year, hundreds of former students stopped by our booth to sign a historic desk from Lockman Hall (that’s currently in display in the Admissions office in the Student Union),” Stoecklein said.

There are also opportunities for student groups or clubs to raise money. They can earn by helping with parking spaces or working in the food court. Nursing students, are able to gain valuable hands-on experience assisting exhibitors in health-related fields,” Stoecklein said.