Students investigate the supernatural

By Merissa Anderson

Collegian Editor

October is prime time for an onslaught of various ghosts and ghouls and Montana Thompson and Trae Jackson have taken it upon themselves to investigate some of the places rumored to be the most haunted in Kansas.

Jackson attended Hutchinson Community College last semester before transferring to K-State but still returns to HutchCC often to hang-out with her close friend, Thompson, who is currently a second year Fire Science student here at HutchCC.

The pair begin their adventures by looking online for places that are said to be haunted.

For their first adventure, they chose a children’s cemetery just outside of Burlington.

“There was a bus crash with kids and a man and they all died,” Jackson said. “You can’t have any electronics and you sit there at night and wait a few minutes and rumors say that man will thump on your car to get you to leave and you’ll see the hand prints of the children on your car.”

Thompson then jumped in to finish the story of their paranormal experience.

“We didn’t listen when he thumped on the car,” Thompson said. “30 seconds it was like a tree smashed on top of our car so we got out of there and when we got back into town and there were fingerprints on car everywhere.”

Despite the warnings to not use electronics in the cemetery, they took their chances and posted their ordeal on snapchat as it happened.

They saved the videos but were deleted from their camera roll the next day.

Although their first haunted experience was frightening for them, they continued their search through the state.

“We went to the Devil’s Church which is a stone building that burned down with a pentagram on the floor when you walk in,” Thompson said.

“We walk up there in the middle of the day and it was creepy and weird but we didn’t hear anything while we were recording but it felt like someone was following you,” Jackson said. “We went back through the video and something says ‘children’ and it’s a devilish, weird voice. I won’t go back.”

In addition to the ghostly voice found in their recording of the church, they also called a friend while investigating the area.

A few days after the phone call with their friend, he came to them claiming the he too was hearing a disembodied laughter seemingly from a child in his kitchen.

“Since he was on the phone with us while we were hunting ghosts, they went to him too,” Thompson said.

Despite their frightening experiences, Thompson and Jackson aren’t afraid of any harm that may come from their ghost hunting.

“We don’t mess with them super crazy and we’re friendly and hang out with them,” Thompson said.

The two encourage students to also pursue ghost hunting for fun.

“We just go to be scared out of our pants,” Jackson said.

“Yeah, we go for the experience and then we run away,” Thompson said.

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Their next adventure will be the Hutchinson Public Library where the ghost of Ida Day, a librarian back in 1901, still haunts the basement to this day.October is prime time for an onslaught of various ghosts and ghouls and Montana Thompson and Trae Jackson have taken it upon themselves to investigate some of the places rumored to be the most haunted in Kansas.
Jackson attended Hutchinson Community College last semester before transferring to K-State but still returns to HutchCC often to hang-out with her close friend, Thompson, who is currently a second year Fire Science student here at HutchCC.
The pair begin their adventures by looking online for places that are said to be haunted.
For their first adventure, they chose a children’s cemetery just outside of Burlington.
“There was a bus crash with kids and a man and they all died,” Jackson said. “You can’t have any electronics and you sit there at night and wait a few minutes and rumors say that man will thump on your car to get you to leave and you’ll see the hand prints of the children on your car.”
Thompson then jumped in to finish the story of their paranormal experience.
“We didn’t listen when he thumped on the car,” Thompson said. “30 seconds it was like a tree smashed on top of our car so we got out of there and when we got back into town and there were fingerprints on car everywhere.”
Despite the warnings to not use electronics in the cemetery, they took their chances and posted their ordeal on snapchat as it happened.
They saved the videos but were deleted from their camera roll the next day.
Although their first haunted experience was frightening for them, they continued their search through the state.
“We went to the Devil’s Church which is a stone building that burned down with a pentagram on the floor when you walk in,” Thompson said.
“We walk up there in the middle of the day and it was creepy and weird but we didn’t hear anything while we were recording but it felt like someone was following you,” Jackson said. “We went back through the video and something says ‘children’ and it’s a devilish, weird voice. I won’t go back.”
In addition to the ghostly voice found in their recording of the church, they also called a friend while investigating the area.
A few days after the phone call with their friend, he came to them claiming the he too was hearing a disembodied laughter seemingly from a child in his kitchen.
“Since he was on the phone with us while we were hunting ghosts, they went to him too,” Thompson said.
Despite their frightening experiences, Thompson and Jackson aren’t afraid of any harm that may come from their ghost hunting.
“We don’t mess with them super crazy and we’re friendly and hang out with them,” Thompson said.
The two encourage students to also pursue ghost hunting for fun.
“We just go to be scared out of our pants,” Jackson said.
“Yeah, we go for the experience and then we run away,” Thompson said.
Their next adventure will be the Hutchinson Public Library where the ghost of Ida Day, a librarian back in 1901, still haunts the basement to this day.

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